Conservation Colorado

Conservation Colorado

We work to protect Colorado’s climate, air, land, water, and communities through organizing, advocacy, and elections. We are at the front lines working to protect the air, land, water, and people across our state. For over 50 years, we’ve worked with communities statewide to ensure that our quality of life and our environment are protected. We work to elect pro-conservation leaders to public office and then hold our decision makers accountable to move Colorado forward in protecting our environment.

  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The "Enough Taxes Already" Initiative would lower and cap from here forward, Denver’s aggregate sale sand use tax rate, from 4.81% to 4.5%.
    It would require the city to stop new sales or use taxes — even if voters approve new ones — above this 4.5% cap.

     

    This initiative would impact the city’s overall revenue and reduce funding for services -- an estimated cut of $4.7 to 8 million dollars before the end of 2021, followed by $50-80 million in cuts in 2022 and every year after. This slash in funding would rob Denver residents of the very improvements that they have overwhelmingly voted to approve, such as road repairs, park maintenance, fire protection, mental health and homeless services. The effect would be undermining Denver voters’ stated priorities in favor of small gains for a select few.

    The "Enough Taxes Already" Initiative would lower and cap from here forward, Denver’s aggregate sale sand use tax rate, from 4.81% to 4.5%.
    It would require the city to stop new sales or use taxes — even if voters approve new ones — above this 4.5% cap.

     

    This initiative would impact the city’s overall revenue and reduce funding for services -- an estimated cut of $4.7 to 8 million dollars before the end of 2021, followed by $50-80 million in cuts in 2022 and every year after. This slash in funding would rob Denver residents of the very improvements that they have overwhelmingly voted to approve, such as road repairs, park maintenance, fire protection, mental health and homeless services. The effect would be undermining Denver voters’ stated priorities in favor of small gains for a select few.

District Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the following district races on your ballot.

  • Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.
    Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.

    Crystal Murillo

    Crystal Murillo was the youngest as well as the first Latina elected to the Aurora City Council in 2017. Murillo is a graduate of the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, the first college graduate in her family. Murillo served on the Citizen Advisory Committee on Housing and Community Development for the City of Aurora and the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Council for the State of Colorado. Since election to the Aurora City Council, Murillo has continued working at the University of Denver as the Diversity Program Coordinator.
  • Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."
    Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."

    Bryan Lindstrom

    Bryan Lindstrom is a lifelong resident of Aurora and graduate of the University of Northern Colorado who currently teaches history at Hinckley High School. Lindstrom served on the Board of Directors of the Aurora Education Association where he was involved in local school board races and fighting for better pay and benefitsd for public school teachers. After witnessing the parents of one of his students testifying in support of affordable housing, Lindstrom entered the Ward 2 City Council race to "move us toward implementing solutions and making lives better."
  • Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.
    Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.

    Ruben Medina

    Ruben Medina, father of three, taught at Denver Public Schools for seven years and is married to a Montview Elementary School teacher. Medina currently serves as the supervisor of the Meadow Wood and Expo Recreation Centers for the City of Aurora, serves on the Board of the Denver Foundation, and consults on community engagement issues locally and internationally. Medina has led community-based initiatives to combat food insecurity and racial profiling.
  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • Endorsed By: Conservation Colorado
  • See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.

    Karen Bigelow

    See the above links for this candidate's endorsements and additional campaign information.
  • Endorsed By: Conservation Colorado, AFSCME Council 18 , Congressman Ed Perlmutter, Congressman Jason Crow, Congressman Joe Neguse
  • VOTE NO

    We recommend voting NO.

  • The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

    The Legislative Authority for Spending State Money would mandate that all state spending from “outside funds” — such as federal money or private donations — would need to be determined and approved by the Colorado Legislature. At a time when Colorado is still rebounding from several disasters, this amendment would effectively paralyze our state in times of future emergencies, when our government needs more flexibility and responsiveness, not less. It also risks over-politicization of ongoing state activities and reduces the influence of technical experts. When our budgeting system fails to produce evidence-based, timely solutions, the most marginalized Coloradans suffer and we miss opportunities to make critical long-term investments in public infrastructure. We must find more nuanced solutions that promote both transparency and effective budgeting.

  • VOTE YES

    We recommend voting YES.

  • The Parks and Trails Sales Tax Extension Measure would make permanent the Arapahoe County sales and use tax authorized in 2003. This measure provides revenue for maintaining parks and wildlife areas, trails, local farms, and water conservation projects. Since its institution, this measure has created 160 parks, trailheads and heritage-area projects; conserved 31,000 acres of open spaces; and in collaboration with partners, has completed 70 miles of trails.
    The Parks and Trails Sales Tax Extension Measure would make permanent the Arapahoe County sales and use tax authorized in 2003. This measure provides revenue for maintaining parks and wildlife areas, trails, local farms, and water conservation projects. Since its institution, this measure has created 160 parks, trailheads and heritage-area projects; conserved 31,000 acres of open spaces; and in collaboration with partners, has completed 70 miles of trails.
  • Endorsed By: Conservation Colorado