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  • Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 

    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position

    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.

     

    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 

    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position

    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.

     

    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 

    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position

    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.

     

    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris

    Re-elect President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to keep America on track. 

    President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris have a track record and policy positions that demonstrate that they will continue to govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse nation.

    Progressive endorsements: President Biden and Vice President Harris have the endorsement of some progressive groups, including the Sierra Club, Reproductive Freedom for All America, League of Conservation Voters, National Center for Transgender Equality, and Students Demand Action. They have also received the endorsement of a significant number of labor unions, including United Auto Workers, Actors’ Equity Association, AFL-CIO, IATSE, National Nurses United, and the American Federation of Teachers. President Biden and Vice President Harris also have the backing of the Democratic National Committee and a significant number of current and former Democratic officials, including former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Climate Envoy John Kerry, 14 current governors, 30 sitting U.S. senators, and over 70 members of the House of Representatives. This list includes California’s elected leaders Gov. Gavin Newsom, Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sen. Alex Padilla, Rep. Katie Porter, Rep. Eric Swalwell, and LA Mayor Karen Bass. 

    Priority policies: The Biden administration has had policy successes across a diversity of issue areas during their first term. Immediately after taking office during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Biden worked to move the American Rescue Plan through Congress and successfully passed legislation to provide stimulus checks, boosts to unemployment payments, and increased funds for education and small-business loans. The plan also ramped up the distribution and administration of vaccines. This legislative effort was followed by the Bi-Partisan Infrastructure Law that made a $1 billion investment in electric vehicle infrastructure, national road and bridge repair, clean drinking water modifications, and power grid updates. In addition to these investments, the administration passed President Biden’s signature Inflation Reduction Act, an expansive bill to provide needed funding to cap prescription drug costs for the elderly, increase corporate taxes, invest in clean energy and climate protections, reduce the federal deficit, and increase tax accountability by provided additional funding to the IRS. The White House has indicated that nearly 170,000 clean energy jobs have been created by this legislation, clean energy investments have increased by $110 billion, and insulin has been capped at $35 a month. After years of inaction from the federal government, President Biden signed a significant gun-safety bill into law, which strengthens background check laws, incentivizes state-based red flag laws, and expands limitations on the acquisition of firearms by perpetrators of domestic abuse. President Biden also signed the CHIPS Act into law to increase domestic production of the semiconductors used in the manufacturing of many of the products Americans use daily. 

    The Biden administration’s economic policies have contributed to the lowest unemployment rate in over 50 years, at 3.4% as of January 2024, economic growth of 3.1% in 2023, and an inflation rate that dropped below 3% at the end of December. The administration has led the U.S. back into the Paris Climate Accord, forgiven $136 billion in education debt, and provided consistent support to striking labor unions across the country. While many of these accomplishments came during the first two years of the administration, when Democrats controlled both chambers of Congress, President Biden and Vice President Harris have worked across the aisle to move impactful legislation forward for the American people with a divided Congress.

    While the administration’s legislative successes have been substantial, they have been subject to significant criticism from progressives during this first term. While President Biden has maintained strong support for Israel during the October 7 Hamas attacks and the Israeli government’s retaliatory attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, the electorate and congressional representatives have expressed concerns about the U.S. government providing continued funding to the Israeli military, and activists and leaders have called on the Biden administration to advocate for a ceasefire in Gaza. On immigration and the southern border, the federal government’s failure to act has effectively continued the anti-immigrant policies enacted under the Trump administration and caused big city mayors and Democratic governors to publicly request that the White House and Congress pass meaningful legislation to reform an increasingly overwhelmed asylum and immigration system. Under Republican control, Congress has not passed any immigration reforms, and Republican leaders have advocated for more punitive and inhumane immigration policies.  

    Governance and community leadership experience: President Biden and Vice President Harris have served in the White House since 2020, when they were elected on a joint ticket with 306 electoral votes and over 51% of the national popular vote. Their campaign won six critical swing states—Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, and Arizona—to secure the electoral college victory.

    Prior to his election, President Biden had a long and prominent political career. He served two terms as former President Barack Obama’s vice president and was responsible for managing the 2009 economic recovery, helping to expand health care through the Affordable Care Act, and acting as the administration’s liaison to the Senate. Before joining the Obama administration, he spent 36 years representing Delaware in the Senate. He was often critiqued as being an unremarkable, status quo Democrat, and mid-career votes in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, anti-drug legislation, and the Iraq War reaffirm that characterization. In 1991, Vice President Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and presided over the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, who had been credibly accused of sexual harassment by a former colleague, Anita Hill. Vice President Biden’s mismanagement of the hearing resulted in a targeted and unfair character assassination of Anita Hill and remains a reminder of his complicity in the patriarchal and racist systems on which our American government is built. 

    Prior to her election, Vice President Harris was the first woman of color elected to represent California in the United States Senate. She sponsored legislation on climate and environmental protections, rental and housing protections, women’s health, and pandemic relief. She was also an original cosponsor of the progressive Green New Deal authored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.  Before serving in the Senate, Vice President Harris had a long legal career in California, serving for 8 years in the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office before transitioning to a role as a prosecutor in the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. In 2003, she won her bid to become district attorney of the City and County of San Francisco, where she served two terms before being elected as the attorney general for the state of California in 2010. She was the first woman and the first person of color to hold this seat. Vice President Harris’s record was both progressive for the time and complicated by her moderate approach to policing and criminal justice. She has been criticized for failing to institute comprehensive police accountability measures, for not establishing meaningful prison reform, and for taking a hands-off approach to cases related to police misconduct. However, her lenient approach to policing was often punctuated by decidedly progressive support for social justice issues, including the establishment of an education and workforce reentry program designed to diminish recidivism. 

    Other background: President Biden is from Scranton, PA, and moved to Delaware with his family when he was 10 years old. He has been a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, for most of his adult life. Vice President Harris grew up in Berkeley, CA, and was a longtime resident of Los Angeles. She is the daughter of a Jamaican father and an Indian mother, who both emigrated to the Bay Area in the 1960s.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: Eight candidates are running in the March 5 Democratic primary, including incumbent President Joe Biden (D), Rep. Dean Phillips (D), and Marianne Williamson (D). The candidate who receives the most delegates in the national Democratic primary will formally become the party’s designated Presidential candidate in August 2024.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: President Biden’s campaign has raised $56 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC, or fossil fuel interests.

    Opposing candidate: Rep. Dean Phillips
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Rep. Phillips’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the FEC as of December 2023.

    Opposing candidate: Marianne Williamson
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Williamson’s campaign has raised $2.6 million as of December 2023, and is funded by corporate PAC interests. A significant amount of her campaign funding has been through candidate donations and loans taken out by the candidate.

     

    The Position

    The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief for all branches of the armed forces. A president has the power to make diplomatic, executive, and judicial appointments, and can sign into law or veto legislation. Presidential administrations are responsible for both foreign and domestic policy priorities. Presidents are limited to serving two four-year terms in office.

     

No Recommendation

No Recommendation - U.S. Senate

There are 22 candidates running for California’s open U.S. Senate seat. Based on our analysis, three qualified candidates for this position have a distinct vision for the state. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

The Race

Primary election: In October 2022, Governor Newsom appointed labor leader, political advisor, and former Emily’s List President Laphonza Butler to serve the remainder of the six-year term of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who died September 2022 after serving in the U.S. Senate since 1992. There are 22 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Rep. Barbara Lee (D), Rep. Katie Porter (D), and Rep. Adam Schiff (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

The Candidates

Key Initiatives: Representative Barbara Lee is a longtime Congresswoman and has been a consistent progressive voice in Congress. She has been a prolific author of legislation related to ending AIDS/HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, has moved efforts to reduce poverty forward, and was the only member of Congress to vote against the authorization for the use of military force after the attacks on September 11, 2001, a controversial position at the time. In recent legislative sessions, she has authored and sponsored legislation to curtail CEO overpay, improve research and public awareness of sickle cell disease, address the national backlog of unprocessed rape kits, and improve mental health resources for students. Prior to her election to the House of Representatives, Rep. Lee worked as a social worker and founded a mental-health service organization, Community Health Alliance for Neighborhood Growth and Education, to benefit her local East Bay community. She then spent eleven years working on the staff of Rep. Ron Dellums, eventually serving as his chief of staff. After her tenure in congressional staffing, she founded a facilities-management company. A few years later, in 1990, Rep. Lee launched a successful bid for a seat in the California Assembly, where she served for six years, before she was elected to the state Senate.

Representative Katie Porter is an attorney and public servant and has been a strong advocate for consumer protection, corporate accountability, and government transparency. She has gained notoriety for her meticulous and expert style of questioning in congressional hearings, and exercises this skill during Oversight and Reform Committee sessions. Her legislative successes include bills to lower prescription drug prices, increase the fee oil and gas companies pay to drill on public lands, lower the income threshold for out-of-pocket healthcare costs, and extend mental healthcare coverage. She has also recently supported efforts to ban members of Congress and their families from trading stocks. Prior to her election to Congress, Rep. Porter spent twenty years as a consumer-protection attorney. Ahead of the housing crisis in 2008, she issued early warnings of the financial system’s predatory lending, and has a strong track record of winning cases related to financial regulation. In 2012, then California Attorney General Kamala Harris appointed Rep. Porter to oversee banks as they returned over $18 billion to cheated homeowners in the state. 

Representative Adam Schiff is an attorney and public official and has been a consistent legislator on issues of government accountability, voting access, healthcare, and voting access. He rose to prominence as the Chair of the House Intelligence Committee who led the first impeachment inquiry of the Trump Administration. He has had legislative success on bills to increase pension payments for teachers, expand labor organizing protections, secure nearly $200 million in funding to address affordable housing development and homelessness in the state, create the patient bill of rights, and limit corporate spending to influence elections. He is also the lead author of legislation to end the NRA and the gun industry’s immunity from liability, which prevented victims and their families from seeking legal recourse. Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Schiff worked as a law clerk and then as Assistant United States Attorney before being elected to California’s State Senate in 1996. He is a longtime supporter of progressive education, immigration, and environmental policies, but has cast unfavorable votes on issues pertaining to military spending and the use of military force, including a 2002 vote in favor of authorizing the use of military force against Iraq. 

Community Leadership Experience, Fundraising, and Endorsements: Rep. Lee has served in Congress since 1998, when she was elected with over 66% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection to CD-12 over a Republican challenger by 81 points. Her campaign has raised $3.3 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests. Rep. Lee has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, Black Women Organized for Political Action PAC, Gen Z for Change, Feminist Majority PAC, Our Revolution, and Reproductive Freedom for All California (formerly NARAL Pro-Choice California). She has also received the endorsement of some community and elected leaders, including Dolores Huerta, State Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, California Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber, Rep. Ro Khanna, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, State Senator Lola Smallwood-Cuevas, Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass, and San Francisco Mayor London Breed. 

Rep. Porter has served in Congress since 2018, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 3 points. Her campaign has raised $22 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or real estate interests. Rep. Porter has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and Women in Leadership PAC. She has also received the endorsement of many elected leaders, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assm. Alex Lee, State Sen. Scott Wiener, Rep. Robert Garcia, and State Sen. Catherine Blakespear.

Rep. Schiff has served in Congress since 2000, when he was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, he won his reelection against a Democratic challenger by 42 points. His campaign has raised $21 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, or fossil fuel interests. Rep. Schiff has the endorsement of some labor groups, including IATSE California Council, IAFF, and Amalgamated Transit Union. He has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Kamlager-Dove, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Tina McKinnor, Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur, and San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria.

Other background: Rep. Lee is from El Paso, TX, and moved to the San Fernando Valley when she was a child. She attended Mills College, where she served as president of the Black Student Union and invited Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm to speak on campus. Her interaction with Rep. Chisholm was an early inspiration for her pursuit of a career in public service. 

Rep. Porter is from Fort Dodge, IA, and now resides in Irvine, CA. Along with her legal practice, she is a longtime tenured professor of law at University of California-Irvine.

Rep. Schiff is from the Bay Area. He holds a law degree from Harvard University.

The District

State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 39 million residents.

Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 22% have no party preference. Democrats have held the Governor’s seat in the state since 2011.

District demographics: 40% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 18 points. Sen. Feinstein won her 2018 reelection against now-Los Angeles City Councilmember Kevin de León by 8 points. 

The Position

Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

No Recommendation - U.S. Senate

There are 22 candidates running for California’s open U.S. Senate seat. Based on our analysis, three qualified candidates for this position have a distinct vision for the state. We recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race.

The Race

Primary election: In October 2022, Governor Newsom appointed labor leader, political advisor, and former Emily’s List President Laphonza Butler to serve the remainder of the six-year term of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who died September 2022 after serving in the U.S. Senate since 1992. There are 22 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Rep. Barbara Lee (D), Rep. Katie Porter (D), and Rep. Adam Schiff (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

The Candidates

Key Initiatives: Representative Barbara Lee is a longtime Congresswoman and has been a consistent progressive voice in Congress. She has been a prolific author of legislation related to ending AIDS/HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, has moved efforts to reduce poverty forward, and was the only member of Congress to vote against the authorization for the use of military force after the attacks on September 11, 2001, a controversial position at the time. In recent legislative sessions, she has authored and sponsored legislation to curtail CEO overpay, improve research and public awareness of sickle cell disease, address the national backlog of unprocessed rape kits, and improve mental health resources for students. Prior to her election to the House of Representatives, Rep. Lee worked as a social worker and founded a mental-health service organization, Community Health Alliance for Neighborhood Growth and Education, to benefit her local East Bay community. She then spent eleven years working on the staff of Rep. Ron Dellums, eventually serving as his chief of staff. After her tenure in congressional staffing, she founded a facilities-management company. A few years later, in 1990, Rep. Lee launched a successful bid for a seat in the California Assembly, where she served for six years, before she was elected to the state Senate.

Representative Katie Porter is an attorney and public servant and has been a strong advocate for consumer protection, corporate accountability, and government transparency. She has gained notoriety for her meticulous and expert style of questioning in congressional hearings, and exercises this skill during Oversight and Reform Committee sessions. Her legislative successes include bills to lower prescription drug prices, increase the fee oil and gas companies pay to drill on public lands, lower the income threshold for out-of-pocket healthcare costs, and extend mental healthcare coverage. She has also recently supported efforts to ban members of Congress and their families from trading stocks. Prior to her election to Congress, Rep. Porter spent twenty years as a consumer-protection attorney. Ahead of the housing crisis in 2008, she issued early warnings of the financial system’s predatory lending, and has a strong track record of winning cases related to financial regulation. In 2012, then California Attorney General Kamala Harris appointed Rep. Porter to oversee banks as they returned over $18 billion to cheated homeowners in the state. 

Representative Adam Schiff is an attorney and public official and has been a consistent legislator on issues of government accountability, voting access, healthcare, and voting access. He rose to prominence as the Chair of the House Intelligence Committee who led the first impeachment inquiry of the Trump Administration. He has had legislative success on bills to increase pension payments for teachers, expand labor organizing protections, secure nearly $200 million in funding to address affordable housing development and homelessness in the state, create the patient bill of rights, and limit corporate spending to influence elections. He is also the lead author of legislation to end the NRA and the gun industry’s immunity from liability, which prevented victims and their families from seeking legal recourse. Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Schiff worked as a law clerk and then as Assistant United States Attorney before being elected to California’s State Senate in 1996. He is a longtime supporter of progressive education, immigration, and environmental policies, but has cast unfavorable votes on issues pertaining to military spending and the use of military force, including a 2002 vote in favor of authorizing the use of military force against Iraq. 

Community Leadership Experience, Fundraising, and Endorsements: Rep. Lee has served in Congress since 1998, when she was elected with over 66% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection to CD-12 over a Republican challenger by 81 points. Her campaign has raised $3.3 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests. Rep. Lee has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, Black Women Organized for Political Action PAC, Gen Z for Change, Feminist Majority PAC, Our Revolution, and Reproductive Freedom for All California (formerly NARAL Pro-Choice California). She has also received the endorsement of some community and elected leaders, including Dolores Huerta, State Attorney General Rob Bonta, State Controller Malia Cohen, California Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber, Rep. Ro Khanna, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, State Senator Lola Smallwood-Cuevas, Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass, and San Francisco Mayor London Breed. 

Rep. Porter has served in Congress since 2018, when she was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, she won her reelection against a Republican challenger by 3 points. Her campaign has raised $22 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, or real estate interests. Rep. Porter has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Labor Federation, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and Women in Leadership PAC. She has also received the endorsement of many elected leaders, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assm. Alex Lee, State Sen. Scott Wiener, Rep. Robert Garcia, and State Sen. Catherine Blakespear.

Rep. Schiff has served in Congress since 2000, when he was elected with over 52% of the vote. In 2022, he won his reelection against a Democratic challenger by 42 points. His campaign has raised $21 million as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, or fossil fuel interests. Rep. Schiff has the endorsement of some labor groups, including IATSE California Council, IAFF, and Amalgamated Transit Union. He has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Kamlager-Dove, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Tina McKinnor, Assm. Rick Chavez Zbur, and San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria.

Other background: Rep. Lee is from El Paso, TX, and moved to the San Fernando Valley when she was a child. She attended Mills College, where she served as president of the Black Student Union and invited Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm to speak on campus. Her interaction with Rep. Chisholm was an early inspiration for her pursuit of a career in public service. 

Rep. Porter is from Fort Dodge, IA, and now resides in Irvine, CA. Along with her legal practice, she is a longtime tenured professor of law at University of California-Irvine.

Rep. Schiff is from the Bay Area. He holds a law degree from Harvard University.

The District

State: California is the most populous state in the United States, and includes 58 counties and 39 million residents.

Voter registration: Of the 22 million registered voters in the state, 47% are Democrat, 24% are Republican, and 22% have no party preference. Democrats have held the Governor’s seat in the state since 2011.

District demographics: 40% Latino, 16% Asian, and 7% Black

Recent election results: California voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 29 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 18 points. Sen. Feinstein won her 2018 reelection against now-Los Angeles City Councilmember Kevin de León by 8 points. 

The Position

Members of the Senate represent and advocate for the needs of their state constituency and share legislative responsibility with the House of Representatives. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues of national importance. Senators have the exclusive responsibility of providing advice and consent to the executive branch on treaties, and on the nomination and approval of cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and federal judges. The Senate also has the sole authority to bring and try an impeachment of a high official, up to and including removal from office with a two-thirds majority vote.

Each state, regardless of population, is represented by two senators. Senate elections are statewide, and senators are elected to serve a six-year term. There is no term limit for this position.

Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

  • Raul Ruiz

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Raul Ruiz to keep CD-25 on the right track for progress. 

    Raul Ruiz

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Raul Ruiz to keep CD-25 on the right track for progress. 

    Raul Ruiz

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Raul Ruiz to keep CD-25 on the right track for progress. 

    Raul Ruiz

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Raul Ruiz to keep CD-25 on the right track for progress. 

  • Norma Torres

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Norma Torres to keep CD-35 on the right track for progress. 

    Norma Torres

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Norma Torres to keep CD-35 on the right track for progress. 

    Norma Torres

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Norma Torres to keep CD-35 on the right track for progress. 

    Norma Torres

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Norma Torres to keep CD-35 on the right track for progress. 

  • Mark Takano

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Mark Takano to keep CD-39 on the right track for progress. 

    Mark Takano

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Mark Takano to keep CD-39 on the right track for progress. 

    Mark Takano

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Mark Takano to keep CD-39 on the right track for progress. 

    Mark Takano

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Mark Takano to keep CD-39 on the right track for progress. 

  • Will Rollins

    Elect Will Rollins for Congress to put CD-41 on the right track for progress.

    Will Rollins’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of CD-41 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Will Rollins

    Elect Will Rollins for Congress to put CD-41 on the right track for progress.

    Will Rollins’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of CD-41 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Will Rollins

    Elect Will Rollins for Congress to put CD-41 on the right track for progress.

    Will Rollins’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of CD-41 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Will Rollins

    Elect Will Rollins for Congress to put CD-41 on the right track for progress.

    Will Rollins’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of CD-41 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

  • Joey Acuña Jr.

    Elect Joey Acuña Jr. for State Assembly to put AD-36 on the right track for progress. 

    Joey Acuña Jr’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-36 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Acuña has received the endorsement of outgoing AD-36 Assm. Eduardo Garcia, Assembly Speaker Robert Rivas, Assembly Speaker Emeritus Anthony Rendon, and Riverside County Supervisor Manny Perez.

    Electoral history: Acuña has run for office previously, and served on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors from 1992 to 2000. In 2014, he returned to the Board after winning his race with over 17% of the vote in a seven-person field. He has won reelection twice since, most recently in 2022, when he earned over 28% of the vote. In 2002, he ran for AD-80, but lost to the Republican candidate by 4 points in the general election. 

    Top issues: Public education, higher education, economic growth, climate protections, and homelessness and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Acuña is an organizational leader and public official, which he does to improve resources and access for a variety of local stakeholders. During his time on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors, where he currently serves as president, he has worked on initiatives to support increased graduation rates, and promote after-school enrichment programming and college-access counseling for students. As a community leader he has managed after-school programs, and served as a development manager and grant writer for local health-care clinics and tribal communities.

    Other background: Acuña is a lifelong resident of the Coachella Valley. 

    The Race

    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Joey Acuña Jr. (D), Waymond Fermon (D), Edgard Garcia (D), Jeffrey Gonzalez (R), Kalin Morse (R), Tomas Oliva (D), and Eric Rodriguez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Acuña’s campaign has raised $73,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, or real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Jeffrey Gonzalez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $11,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 36th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside, Imperial, and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 27% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Partisan control of this district has switched several times over the last decade, most recently in 2022, when Assm. Eduardo Garcia won the redistricted seat and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 59% Latino, 3% Asian, and 4% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-36 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 15 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Joey Acuña Jr.

    Elect Joey Acuña Jr. for State Assembly to put AD-36 on the right track for progress. 

    Joey Acuña Jr’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-36 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Acuña has received the endorsement of outgoing AD-36 Assm. Eduardo Garcia, Assembly Speaker Robert Rivas, Assembly Speaker Emeritus Anthony Rendon, and Riverside County Supervisor Manny Perez.

    Electoral history: Acuña has run for office previously, and served on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors from 1992 to 2000. In 2014, he returned to the Board after winning his race with over 17% of the vote in a seven-person field. He has won reelection twice since, most recently in 2022, when he earned over 28% of the vote. In 2002, he ran for AD-80, but lost to the Republican candidate by 4 points in the general election. 

    Top issues: Public education, higher education, economic growth, climate protections, and homelessness and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Acuña is an organizational leader and public official, which he does to improve resources and access for a variety of local stakeholders. During his time on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors, where he currently serves as president, he has worked on initiatives to support increased graduation rates, and promote after-school enrichment programming and college-access counseling for students. As a community leader he has managed after-school programs, and served as a development manager and grant writer for local health-care clinics and tribal communities.

    Other background: Acuña is a lifelong resident of the Coachella Valley. 

    The Race

    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Joey Acuña Jr. (D), Waymond Fermon (D), Edgard Garcia (D), Jeffrey Gonzalez (R), Kalin Morse (R), Tomas Oliva (D), and Eric Rodriguez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Acuña’s campaign has raised $73,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, or real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Jeffrey Gonzalez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $11,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 36th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside, Imperial, and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 27% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Partisan control of this district has switched several times over the last decade, most recently in 2022, when Assm. Eduardo Garcia won the redistricted seat and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 59% Latino, 3% Asian, and 4% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-36 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 15 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Joey Acuña Jr.

    Elect Joey Acuña Jr. for State Assembly to put AD-36 on the right track for progress. 

    Joey Acuña Jr’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-36 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Acuña has received the endorsement of outgoing AD-36 Assm. Eduardo Garcia, Assembly Speaker Robert Rivas, Assembly Speaker Emeritus Anthony Rendon, and Riverside County Supervisor Manny Perez.

    Electoral history: Acuña has run for office previously, and served on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors from 1992 to 2000. In 2014, he returned to the Board after winning his race with over 17% of the vote in a seven-person field. He has won reelection twice since, most recently in 2022, when he earned over 28% of the vote. In 2002, he ran for AD-80, but lost to the Republican candidate by 4 points in the general election. 

    Top issues: Public education, higher education, economic growth, climate protections, and homelessness and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Acuña is an organizational leader and public official, which he does to improve resources and access for a variety of local stakeholders. During his time on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors, where he currently serves as president, he has worked on initiatives to support increased graduation rates, and promote after-school enrichment programming and college-access counseling for students. As a community leader he has managed after-school programs, and served as a development manager and grant writer for local health-care clinics and tribal communities.

    Other background: Acuña is a lifelong resident of the Coachella Valley. 

    The Race

    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Joey Acuña Jr. (D), Waymond Fermon (D), Edgard Garcia (D), Jeffrey Gonzalez (R), Kalin Morse (R), Tomas Oliva (D), and Eric Rodriguez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Acuña’s campaign has raised $73,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, or real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Jeffrey Gonzalez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $11,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 36th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside, Imperial, and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 27% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Partisan control of this district has switched several times over the last decade, most recently in 2022, when Assm. Eduardo Garcia won the redistricted seat and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 59% Latino, 3% Asian, and 4% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-36 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 15 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Joey Acuña Jr.

    Elect Joey Acuña Jr. for State Assembly to put AD-36 on the right track for progress. 

    Joey Acuña Jr’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a representative voice for the constituents of AD-36 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Acuña has received the endorsement of outgoing AD-36 Assm. Eduardo Garcia, Assembly Speaker Robert Rivas, Assembly Speaker Emeritus Anthony Rendon, and Riverside County Supervisor Manny Perez.

    Electoral history: Acuña has run for office previously, and served on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors from 1992 to 2000. In 2014, he returned to the Board after winning his race with over 17% of the vote in a seven-person field. He has won reelection twice since, most recently in 2022, when he earned over 28% of the vote. In 2002, he ran for AD-80, but lost to the Republican candidate by 4 points in the general election. 

    Top issues: Public education, higher education, economic growth, climate protections, and homelessness and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Acuña is an organizational leader and public official, which he does to improve resources and access for a variety of local stakeholders. During his time on the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board of Directors, where he currently serves as president, he has worked on initiatives to support increased graduation rates, and promote after-school enrichment programming and college-access counseling for students. As a community leader he has managed after-school programs, and served as a development manager and grant writer for local health-care clinics and tribal communities.

    Other background: Acuña is a lifelong resident of the Coachella Valley. 

    The Race

    Primary election: There are seven candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Joey Acuña Jr. (D), Waymond Fermon (D), Edgard Garcia (D), Jeffrey Gonzalez (R), Kalin Morse (R), Tomas Oliva (D), and Eric Rodriguez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Acuña’s campaign has raised $73,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, corporate PAC, or real estate interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Jeffrey Gonzalez
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $11,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC interests.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 36th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside, Imperial, and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 44% Democrat, 27% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Partisan control of this district has switched several times over the last decade, most recently in 2022, when Assm. Eduardo Garcia won the redistricted seat and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 59% Latino, 3% Asian, and 4% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-36 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 15 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Christy Holstege

    Courage California endorses Christy Holstege for State Assembly to put AD-47 on the right track for progress. 

    Christy Holstege’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-47 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Holstege has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, in previous campaigns, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Peace Officers Research Association of California. 

    Electoral history: Holstege ran for this seat in 2022, but lost to a Republican challenger, Assm. Greg Wallis, by less than 100 votes. Prior to her first run for Assembly, Holstege won a seat on the Palm Springs City Council in 2017 with 30% of the vote. In 2020, she won re-election to the council with 54% of the vote, and served a one-year term as mayor.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, pandemic recovery, environmental protections and clean energy, veterans’ services, and LGBTQIA+ equality.

    Priority bills: As mayor and a member of the Palm Springs City Council, Holstege has supported the establishment of a guaranteed-income program for transgender and nonbinary residents, broke ground on a new affordable housing project, and began a partial transition to residential wind energy. She also helped create protections for workers and small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Holstege is an attorney and established a legal aid clinic for domestic violence survivors at the Coachella Valley’s only domestic violence shelter. She has also represented farmworkers in civil rights, housing, and employment litigation at California Rural Legal Assistance. Holstege served on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest and Eastern Coachella Valley for Change. She also served on the Palm Springs Human Rights Commission and the City of Palm Springs Homelessness Task Force.

    Other background: Holstege lives in Palm Springs. She was the first openly bisexual person to serve a term as mayor in the United States.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are three candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Christy Holstege (D), Jamie Swain (D), and incumbent Assm. Greg Wallis (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Holstege’s campaign has raised $511,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Greg Wallis
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Wallis’s campaign has raised $410,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 47th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 34% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. Democrats held this seat until 2022 when Assm. Greg Wallis won and flipped it from blue to red.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 4% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-47 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 7 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

    Christy Holstege

    Courage California endorses Christy Holstege for State Assembly to put AD-47 on the right track for progress. 

    Christy Holstege’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-47 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Holstege has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, in previous campaigns, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Peace Officers Research Association of California. 

    Electoral history: Holstege ran for this seat in 2022, but lost to a Republican challenger, Assm. Greg Wallis, by less than 100 votes. Prior to her first run for Assembly, Holstege won a seat on the Palm Springs City Council in 2017 with 30% of the vote. In 2020, she won re-election to the council with 54% of the vote, and served a one-year term as mayor.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, pandemic recovery, environmental protections and clean energy, veterans’ services, and LGBTQIA+ equality.

    Priority bills: As mayor and a member of the Palm Springs City Council, Holstege has supported the establishment of a guaranteed-income program for transgender and nonbinary residents, broke ground on a new affordable housing project, and began a partial transition to residential wind energy. She also helped create protections for workers and small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Holstege is an attorney and established a legal aid clinic for domestic violence survivors at the Coachella Valley’s only domestic violence shelter. She has also represented farmworkers in civil rights, housing, and employment litigation at California Rural Legal Assistance. Holstege served on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest and Eastern Coachella Valley for Change. She also served on the Palm Springs Human Rights Commission and the City of Palm Springs Homelessness Task Force.

    Other background: Holstege lives in Palm Springs. She was the first openly bisexual person to serve a term as mayor in the United States.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are three candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Christy Holstege (D), Jamie Swain (D), and incumbent Assm. Greg Wallis (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Holstege’s campaign has raised $511,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Greg Wallis
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Wallis’s campaign has raised $410,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 47th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 34% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. Democrats held this seat until 2022 when Assm. Greg Wallis won and flipped it from blue to red.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 4% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-47 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 7 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

    Christy Holstege

    Courage California endorses Christy Holstege for State Assembly to put AD-47 on the right track for progress. 

    Christy Holstege’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-47 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Holstege has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, in previous campaigns, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Peace Officers Research Association of California. 

    Electoral history: Holstege ran for this seat in 2022, but lost to a Republican challenger, Assm. Greg Wallis, by less than 100 votes. Prior to her first run for Assembly, Holstege won a seat on the Palm Springs City Council in 2017 with 30% of the vote. In 2020, she won re-election to the council with 54% of the vote, and served a one-year term as mayor.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, pandemic recovery, environmental protections and clean energy, veterans’ services, and LGBTQIA+ equality.

    Priority bills: As mayor and a member of the Palm Springs City Council, Holstege has supported the establishment of a guaranteed-income program for transgender and nonbinary residents, broke ground on a new affordable housing project, and began a partial transition to residential wind energy. She also helped create protections for workers and small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Holstege is an attorney and established a legal aid clinic for domestic violence survivors at the Coachella Valley’s only domestic violence shelter. She has also represented farmworkers in civil rights, housing, and employment litigation at California Rural Legal Assistance. Holstege served on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest and Eastern Coachella Valley for Change. She also served on the Palm Springs Human Rights Commission and the City of Palm Springs Homelessness Task Force.

    Other background: Holstege lives in Palm Springs. She was the first openly bisexual person to serve a term as mayor in the United States.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are three candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Christy Holstege (D), Jamie Swain (D), and incumbent Assm. Greg Wallis (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Holstege’s campaign has raised $511,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Greg Wallis
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Wallis’s campaign has raised $410,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 47th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 34% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. Democrats held this seat until 2022 when Assm. Greg Wallis won and flipped it from blue to red.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 4% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-47 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 7 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

    Christy Holstege

    Courage California endorses Christy Holstege for State Assembly to put AD-47 on the right track for progress. 

    Christy Holstege’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-47 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Holstege has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Environmental Voters, and AFSCME California. However, in previous campaigns, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Peace Officers Research Association of California. 

    Electoral history: Holstege ran for this seat in 2022, but lost to a Republican challenger, Assm. Greg Wallis, by less than 100 votes. Prior to her first run for Assembly, Holstege won a seat on the Palm Springs City Council in 2017 with 30% of the vote. In 2020, she won re-election to the council with 54% of the vote, and served a one-year term as mayor.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, pandemic recovery, environmental protections and clean energy, veterans’ services, and LGBTQIA+ equality.

    Priority bills: As mayor and a member of the Palm Springs City Council, Holstege has supported the establishment of a guaranteed-income program for transgender and nonbinary residents, broke ground on a new affordable housing project, and began a partial transition to residential wind energy. She also helped create protections for workers and small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Holstege is an attorney and established a legal aid clinic for domestic violence survivors at the Coachella Valley’s only domestic violence shelter. She has also represented farmworkers in civil rights, housing, and employment litigation at California Rural Legal Assistance. Holstege served on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest and Eastern Coachella Valley for Change. She also served on the Palm Springs Human Rights Commission and the City of Palm Springs Homelessness Task Force.

    Other background: Holstege lives in Palm Springs. She was the first openly bisexual person to serve a term as mayor in the United States.

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are three candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Christy Holstege (D), Jamie Swain (D), and incumbent Assm. Greg Wallis (R). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Holstege’s campaign has raised $511,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by corporate PAC, fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Greg Wallis
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Wallis’s campaign has raised $410,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 47th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 34% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. Democrats held this seat until 2022 when Assm. Greg Wallis won and flipped it from blue to red.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 4% Asian, and 5% Black. 

    Recent election results: AD-47 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 7 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Clarissa Cervantes

    Courage California endorses Clarissa Cervantes for State Assembly to put AD-58 on the right track for progress.

    Clarissa Cervantes’ policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-58 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Cervantes has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, LGBTQ+ Victory Fund, and Equality California, as well as labor unions like SEIU, National Union of Healthcare Workers, UAW, CA Faculty Association, and CA Federation of Teachers. 

    Electoral history: Clarissa Cervantes has run for office previously, and won a seat on the Riverside City Council as the top vote-getter in a field of 6, with 52% of the vote.

    Top issues: Infrastructure, transportation, small business, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Clarissa Cervante is a businesswoman, and organizer, and a Riverside City Councilmember, which she does to bring representation and progressive solutions to community issues. On the Riverside City Council, she has helped to secure funding for infrastructure projects and to administer grants for small business, and voted to increase affordable housing. She previously chaired the Transportation NOW Chapter of the Riverside Transit Agency, which aims to increase access and equity in Riverside public transit. Cervantes also served as legislative field representative for her city council predecessor and political organizer for SEIU 121RN. She has worked and led several voter-registration drives, registering over 30,000 Democrats in the Inland Empire.

    Other background: Cervantes, a campaign organizer and city councilmember, is from Riverside County. She earned her BA from California State University Northridge, and a master’s from Cal Poly Pomona. Cervantes was one of the first Latinas and LGBTQIA+ individuals elected to the Riverside City Council. She has served on various boards and organizations in the district, including Riverside Arts Academy and Riverside County Young Democrats. 

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Clarissa Cervantes (D), Leticia Castillo (R), and Ronaldo Fierro (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Cervantes’ campaign has raised $345,500 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police..

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ronaldo Fierro and Republican Leticia Castillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Fierro’s campaign has raised $307,343 and is funded by the real estate industry and the police. Castillo’s campaign has raised $10,493.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 58th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 45% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 52% Latino, 7% Asian, and 7% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-58 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

    Clarissa Cervantes

    Courage California endorses Clarissa Cervantes for State Assembly to put AD-58 on the right track for progress.

    Clarissa Cervantes’ policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-58 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Cervantes has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, LGBTQ+ Victory Fund, and Equality California, as well as labor unions like SEIU, National Union of Healthcare Workers, UAW, CA Faculty Association, and CA Federation of Teachers. 

    Electoral history: Clarissa Cervantes has run for office previously, and won a seat on the Riverside City Council as the top vote-getter in a field of 6, with 52% of the vote.

    Top issues: Infrastructure, transportation, small business, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Clarissa Cervante is a businesswoman, and organizer, and a Riverside City Councilmember, which she does to bring representation and progressive solutions to community issues. On the Riverside City Council, she has helped to secure funding for infrastructure projects and to administer grants for small business, and voted to increase affordable housing. She previously chaired the Transportation NOW Chapter of the Riverside Transit Agency, which aims to increase access and equity in Riverside public transit. Cervantes also served as legislative field representative for her city council predecessor and political organizer for SEIU 121RN. She has worked and led several voter-registration drives, registering over 30,000 Democrats in the Inland Empire.

    Other background: Cervantes, a campaign organizer and city councilmember, is from Riverside County. She earned her BA from California State University Northridge, and a master’s from Cal Poly Pomona. Cervantes was one of the first Latinas and LGBTQIA+ individuals elected to the Riverside City Council. She has served on various boards and organizations in the district, including Riverside Arts Academy and Riverside County Young Democrats. 

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Clarissa Cervantes (D), Leticia Castillo (R), and Ronaldo Fierro (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Cervantes’ campaign has raised $345,500 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police..

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ronaldo Fierro and Republican Leticia Castillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Fierro’s campaign has raised $307,343 and is funded by the real estate industry and the police. Castillo’s campaign has raised $10,493.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 58th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 45% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 52% Latino, 7% Asian, and 7% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-58 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

    Clarissa Cervantes

    Courage California endorses Clarissa Cervantes for State Assembly to put AD-58 on the right track for progress.

    Clarissa Cervantes’ policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-58 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Cervantes has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, LGBTQ+ Victory Fund, and Equality California, as well as labor unions like SEIU, National Union of Healthcare Workers, UAW, CA Faculty Association, and CA Federation of Teachers. 

    Electoral history: Clarissa Cervantes has run for office previously, and won a seat on the Riverside City Council as the top vote-getter in a field of 6, with 52% of the vote.

    Top issues: Infrastructure, transportation, small business, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Clarissa Cervante is a businesswoman, and organizer, and a Riverside City Councilmember, which she does to bring representation and progressive solutions to community issues. On the Riverside City Council, she has helped to secure funding for infrastructure projects and to administer grants for small business, and voted to increase affordable housing. She previously chaired the Transportation NOW Chapter of the Riverside Transit Agency, which aims to increase access and equity in Riverside public transit. Cervantes also served as legislative field representative for her city council predecessor and political organizer for SEIU 121RN. She has worked and led several voter-registration drives, registering over 30,000 Democrats in the Inland Empire.

    Other background: Cervantes, a campaign organizer and city councilmember, is from Riverside County. She earned her BA from California State University Northridge, and a master’s from Cal Poly Pomona. Cervantes was one of the first Latinas and LGBTQIA+ individuals elected to the Riverside City Council. She has served on various boards and organizations in the district, including Riverside Arts Academy and Riverside County Young Democrats. 

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Clarissa Cervantes (D), Leticia Castillo (R), and Ronaldo Fierro (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Cervantes’ campaign has raised $345,500 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police..

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ronaldo Fierro and Republican Leticia Castillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Fierro’s campaign has raised $307,343 and is funded by the real estate industry and the police. Castillo’s campaign has raised $10,493.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 58th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 45% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 52% Latino, 7% Asian, and 7% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-58 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

    Clarissa Cervantes

    Courage California endorses Clarissa Cervantes for State Assembly to put AD-58 on the right track for progress.

    Clarissa Cervantes’ policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-58 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Cervantes has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, IE United, LGBTQ+ Victory Fund, and Equality California, as well as labor unions like SEIU, National Union of Healthcare Workers, UAW, CA Faculty Association, and CA Federation of Teachers. 

    Electoral history: Clarissa Cervantes has run for office previously, and won a seat on the Riverside City Council as the top vote-getter in a field of 6, with 52% of the vote.

    Top issues: Infrastructure, transportation, small business, public safety, and housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Clarissa Cervante is a businesswoman, and organizer, and a Riverside City Councilmember, which she does to bring representation and progressive solutions to community issues. On the Riverside City Council, she has helped to secure funding for infrastructure projects and to administer grants for small business, and voted to increase affordable housing. She previously chaired the Transportation NOW Chapter of the Riverside Transit Agency, which aims to increase access and equity in Riverside public transit. Cervantes also served as legislative field representative for her city council predecessor and political organizer for SEIU 121RN. She has worked and led several voter-registration drives, registering over 30,000 Democrats in the Inland Empire.

    Other background: Cervantes, a campaign organizer and city councilmember, is from Riverside County. She earned her BA from California State University Northridge, and a master’s from Cal Poly Pomona. Cervantes was one of the first Latinas and LGBTQIA+ individuals elected to the Riverside City Council. She has served on various boards and organizations in the district, including Riverside Arts Academy and Riverside County Young Democrats. 

     

    The Race

    Primary election: There are 3 candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Clarissa Cervantes (D), Leticia Castillo (R), and Ronaldo Fierro (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Cervantes’ campaign has raised $345,500 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police..

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Ronaldo Fierro and Republican Leticia Castillo
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Fierro’s campaign has raised $307,343 and is funded by the real estate industry and the police. Castillo’s campaign has raised $10,493.

     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 58th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 45% Democrat, 26% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district.

    District demographics: 52% Latino, 7% Asian, and 7% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-58 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 19 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 2 points.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Corey Jackson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Corey Jackson to keep AD-60 on the right track for progress. 

    Assm. Corey Jackson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-60 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Jackson has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Education and youth advocacy, universal childcare, trauma-informed practices in school, education reform, affordable housing guarantee, and campaign-finance reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Jackson’s priorities for AD-60 have included 28 bills about mental health care, police reform, school safety, and youth social services. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit book banning in the state, establish the Hate Crimes Intervention Program, and improve the foster care system. He scores a CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jackson has supported most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Jackson failed to cast a vote on a few critical pieces of legislation this session, including bills to increase accountability for charter schools by requiring increased grant fund reporting, and requiring businesses with over $500 million in revenue to publicly disclose their climate-related financial risk. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Jackson currently sits on 20 committees, including Budget, Business and Professions, Human Services, Jobs, Economic Development, and the Economy, and Transportation. He serves as chair of the Select Committee on California’s Mental Health Crisis. He is also parliamentarian of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Jackson has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. In 2020, he was elected to the Riverside County Board of Education as the Area 3 Trustee with over 65% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Jackson served on the Riverside County School Board where he advocated to increase mental-health services in schools and to eliminate the criminalization of children. He also founded the non-profit SBX Youth and Family Services, which aims to disrupt the cycle of poverty through mentorship, education, and community organizing. He has also held leadership positions in the Riverside NAACP. 

    Other background: Assm. Corey A. Jackson is from Rialto, and has lived in Riverside County for more than ten years. He holds a master’s of social work from California Baptist University.

    The Race

    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Corey Jackson (D), Hector Diaz (R), Ronald Edwards (R), and Cynthia Mendez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Jackson’s campaign has raised $295,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 60th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 47% Democrat, 23% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until 2016, when Assm. Sabrina Cervantes won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 51% Latino, 5% Asian, and 15% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-60 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 10 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Corey Jackson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Corey Jackson to keep AD-60 on the right track for progress. 

    Assm. Corey Jackson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-60 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Jackson has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Education and youth advocacy, universal childcare, trauma-informed practices in school, education reform, affordable housing guarantee, and campaign-finance reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Jackson’s priorities for AD-60 have included 28 bills about mental health care, police reform, school safety, and youth social services. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit book banning in the state, establish the Hate Crimes Intervention Program, and improve the foster care system. He scores a CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jackson has supported most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Jackson failed to cast a vote on a few critical pieces of legislation this session, including bills to increase accountability for charter schools by requiring increased grant fund reporting, and requiring businesses with over $500 million in revenue to publicly disclose their climate-related financial risk. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Jackson currently sits on 20 committees, including Budget, Business and Professions, Human Services, Jobs, Economic Development, and the Economy, and Transportation. He serves as chair of the Select Committee on California’s Mental Health Crisis. He is also parliamentarian of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Jackson has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. In 2020, he was elected to the Riverside County Board of Education as the Area 3 Trustee with over 65% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Jackson served on the Riverside County School Board where he advocated to increase mental-health services in schools and to eliminate the criminalization of children. He also founded the non-profit SBX Youth and Family Services, which aims to disrupt the cycle of poverty through mentorship, education, and community organizing. He has also held leadership positions in the Riverside NAACP. 

    Other background: Assm. Corey A. Jackson is from Rialto, and has lived in Riverside County for more than ten years. He holds a master’s of social work from California Baptist University.

    The Race

    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Corey Jackson (D), Hector Diaz (R), Ronald Edwards (R), and Cynthia Mendez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Jackson’s campaign has raised $295,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 60th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 47% Democrat, 23% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until 2016, when Assm. Sabrina Cervantes won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 51% Latino, 5% Asian, and 15% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-60 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 10 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Corey Jackson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Corey Jackson to keep AD-60 on the right track for progress. 

    Assm. Corey Jackson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-60 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Jackson has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Education and youth advocacy, universal childcare, trauma-informed practices in school, education reform, affordable housing guarantee, and campaign-finance reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Jackson’s priorities for AD-60 have included 28 bills about mental health care, police reform, school safety, and youth social services. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit book banning in the state, establish the Hate Crimes Intervention Program, and improve the foster care system. He scores a CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jackson has supported most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Jackson failed to cast a vote on a few critical pieces of legislation this session, including bills to increase accountability for charter schools by requiring increased grant fund reporting, and requiring businesses with over $500 million in revenue to publicly disclose their climate-related financial risk. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Jackson currently sits on 20 committees, including Budget, Business and Professions, Human Services, Jobs, Economic Development, and the Economy, and Transportation. He serves as chair of the Select Committee on California’s Mental Health Crisis. He is also parliamentarian of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Jackson has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. In 2020, he was elected to the Riverside County Board of Education as the Area 3 Trustee with over 65% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Jackson served on the Riverside County School Board where he advocated to increase mental-health services in schools and to eliminate the criminalization of children. He also founded the non-profit SBX Youth and Family Services, which aims to disrupt the cycle of poverty through mentorship, education, and community organizing. He has also held leadership positions in the Riverside NAACP. 

    Other background: Assm. Corey A. Jackson is from Rialto, and has lived in Riverside County for more than ten years. He holds a master’s of social work from California Baptist University.

    The Race

    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Corey Jackson (D), Hector Diaz (R), Ronald Edwards (R), and Cynthia Mendez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Jackson’s campaign has raised $295,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 60th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 47% Democrat, 23% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until 2016, when Assm. Sabrina Cervantes won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 51% Latino, 5% Asian, and 15% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-60 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 10 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Corey Jackson

    Re-elect Assemblymember Corey Jackson to keep AD-60 on the right track for progress. 

    Assm. Corey Jackson’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-60 and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Jackson has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Equality California, California Environmental Voters, and SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West. 

    Top issues: Education and youth advocacy, universal childcare, trauma-informed practices in school, education reform, affordable housing guarantee, and campaign-finance reform.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Jackson’s priorities for AD-60 have included 28 bills about mental health care, police reform, school safety, and youth social services. Of these, five have been successfully chaptered into law, two have been vetoed, and the rest remain in committee. He has sponsored and passed legislation to prohibit book banning in the state, establish the Hate Crimes Intervention Program, and improve the foster care system. He scores a CS of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Jackson has supported most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assm. Jackson failed to cast a vote on a few critical pieces of legislation this session, including bills to increase accountability for charter schools by requiring increased grant fund reporting, and requiring businesses with over $500 million in revenue to publicly disclose their climate-related financial risk. 

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Jackson currently sits on 20 committees, including Budget, Business and Professions, Human Services, Jobs, Economic Development, and the Economy, and Transportation. He serves as chair of the Select Committee on California’s Mental Health Crisis. He is also parliamentarian of the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus and the California Legislative LGBTQ Caucus.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Jackson has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when he was elected with over 54% of the vote. In 2020, he was elected to the Riverside County Board of Education as the Area 3 Trustee with over 65% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Assm. Jackson served on the Riverside County School Board where he advocated to increase mental-health services in schools and to eliminate the criminalization of children. He also founded the non-profit SBX Youth and Family Services, which aims to disrupt the cycle of poverty through mentorship, education, and community organizing. He has also held leadership positions in the Riverside NAACP. 

    Other background: Assm. Corey A. Jackson is from Rialto, and has lived in Riverside County for more than ten years. He holds a master’s of social work from California Baptist University.

    The Race

    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Assm. Corey Jackson (D), Hector Diaz (R), Ronald Edwards (R), and Cynthia Mendez (D). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Jackson’s campaign has raised $295,000 as of December 2023, and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, or police interests.

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: None of the challengers in this race have filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 60th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 47% Democrat, 23% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Republicans held this seat until 2016, when Assm. Sabrina Cervantes won and flipped it from red to blue. 

    District demographics: 51% Latino, 5% Asian, and 15% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-60 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2022 by 10 points.

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

No Recommendation

No Recommendation - AD63

This district is a safe Republican seat in the 2024 election cycle with no Democratic challenger running in this race. 

Independent challenger Orlando Munguia has not run for public office before. He is a former Marine, attended the January 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol, and has ties to QAnon.

Incumbent Republican Assm. Bill Essayli was elected to the Assembly in 2022 after winning over 58% of the vote. He has been the architect of deeply problematic legislation during his first session in the legislature, including authoring AB1314 to require school staff to out transgender students to their parents or guardians. This type of legislation has drawn national concern from LGBTQIA+ organizations for its potential to create dangerous or abusive circumstances at home for queer and trans students. He scores a CS of 0 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Essayli has supported no progressive bills that made it to a vote. 

The Race

Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including incumbent Assm. Bill Essayli (R) and Orlando Munguia (NPP). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Munguia’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023..

Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Essayli’s campaign has raised $226,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 63rd Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

Voter registration: 35% Democrat, 38% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference. Democrats held this district until 2022 when redistricting caused it to flip from blue to red.

District demographics: 31% Latino, 11% Asian, and 7% Black.

Recent election results: AD-63 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2020 by 6 points and Brian Dahle for governor in 2022 by 18 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

No Recommendation - AD63

This district is a safe Republican seat in the 2024 election cycle with no Democratic challenger running in this race. 

Independent challenger Orlando Munguia has not run for public office before. He is a former Marine, attended the January 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol, and has ties to QAnon.

Incumbent Republican Assm. Bill Essayli was elected to the Assembly in 2022 after winning over 58% of the vote. He has been the architect of deeply problematic legislation during his first session in the legislature, including authoring AB1314 to require school staff to out transgender students to their parents or guardians. This type of legislation has drawn national concern from LGBTQIA+ organizations for its potential to create dangerous or abusive circumstances at home for queer and trans students. He scores a CS of 0 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Essayli has supported no progressive bills that made it to a vote. 

The Race

Primary election: There are two candidates running in the March 5 primary, including incumbent Assm. Bill Essayli (R) and Orlando Munguia (NPP). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Munguia’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023..

Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Essayli’s campaign has raised $226,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 63rd Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

Voter registration: 35% Democrat, 38% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference. Democrats held this district until 2022 when redistricting caused it to flip from blue to red.

District demographics: 31% Latino, 11% Asian, and 7% Black.

Recent election results: AD-63 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2020 by 6 points and Brian Dahle for governor in 2022 by 18 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

No Recommendation

AD71 - No Recommendation

Based on our analysis, this district will be a safe Republican seat in the 2024 election cycle. While a Democratic candidate is unlikely to win, we recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race. 

Governance, community leadership experience, and background: Gary Kephart has run for both the Assembly and the state Senate previously. In 2010, he lost his bid for AD-71 by 32 points. In 2014, he lost his bid for SD-36 by 32 points. 

Kephart is a software engineer. He served for six years on the Ladera Ranch Civic Council, which is a locally created organization that liaises with the county on public safety, public services, and business development. 

The Race

Primary election: There are three candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Gary Kephart (D), incumbent Assm. Kate Sanchez (R), and Babar Khan (PAF). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Kephart’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.

Opposing candidate: Assm. Kate Sanchez
Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Sanchez’s campaign has raised $186,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 71st Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and Orange Counties.

Voter registration: 31% Democrat, 40% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this district.

District demographics: 20% Latino, 11% Asian, and 4% Black.

Recent election results: AD-71 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2020 by 7 points and Brian Dahle for governor in 2022 by 20 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

AD71 - No Recommendation

Based on our analysis, this district will be a safe Republican seat in the 2024 election cycle. While a Democratic candidate is unlikely to win, we recommend that you choose the candidate who best aligns to your values in this race. 

Governance, community leadership experience, and background: Gary Kephart has run for both the Assembly and the state Senate previously. In 2010, he lost his bid for AD-71 by 32 points. In 2014, he lost his bid for SD-36 by 32 points. 

Kephart is a software engineer. He served for six years on the Ladera Ranch Civic Council, which is a locally created organization that liaises with the county on public safety, public services, and business development. 

The Race

Primary election: There are three candidates running in the March 5 primary, including Gary Kephart (D), incumbent Assm. Kate Sanchez (R), and Babar Khan (PAF). The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5.

Candidate fundraising and pledges: Kephart’s campaign has not filed any campaign fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State’s office as of December 2023.

Opposing candidate: Assm. Kate Sanchez
Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Sanchez’s campaign has raised $186,000 as of December 2023, and is funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, and corporate PAC interests.

The District

Counties in district: California’s 71st Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and Orange Counties.

Voter registration: 31% Democrat, 40% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Republicans typically hold this district.

District demographics: 20% Latino, 11% Asian, and 4% Black.

Recent election results: AD-71 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2020 by 7 points and Brian Dahle for governor in 2022 by 20 points.

The Position

State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

  • Lisa Middleton

    Elect Lisa Middleton for state Senate to put SD-19 on the right track for progress. 

    Lisa Middleton

    Elect Lisa Middleton for state Senate to put SD-19 on the right track for progress. 

    Lisa Middleton

    Elect Lisa Middleton for state Senate to put SD-19 on the right track for progress. 

    Lisa Middleton

    Elect Lisa Middleton for state Senate to put SD-19 on the right track for progress. 

  • Angelo Farooq

    Elect Angelo Farooq for State Senate to put SD-31 on the right track for progress. 

    Angelo Farooq

    Elect Angelo Farooq for State Senate to put SD-31 on the right track for progress. 

    Angelo Farooq

    Elect Angelo Farooq for State Senate to put SD-31 on the right track for progress. 

    Angelo Farooq

    Elect Angelo Farooq for State Senate to put SD-31 on the right track for progress. 

  • Elect Graciela Torres for Supervisor to put Riverside County on the right track for progress. 



    Graciela “Gracie” Torres’ track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Riverside County and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Torres has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, California Women’s List, and Run for Something. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Assm. Corey Jackson, Fresno Councilmember Nelson Esparza, and Palm Springs Councilmember Christy Holstege.

    Electoral history: Torres won her most recent race for Western Municipal Water District in a nonpartisan race, finishing as the top vote-getter in a field of 5 candidates with 58% of the vote.

    Top issues: Homelessness, public safety, infrastructure, and the economy.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Gracie Torres is an environmental planner and a compliance expert, and sits on the Western Municipal Water District, which she does because of her passion for environmental science and quality water for her community. She co-founded the organization IEWorks, which is dedicated to investing in workforce development in the water sector. She is the youngest and first ever immigrant Latina elected to the Western Municipal Water District.

    Other background: Torres has lived in Riverside since she was an adolescent. She earned her BA and master’s degree from California State University San Bernardino.

    The Race


    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the nonpartisan March 5 primary, including Graciela Torres, Debbie Walsh, State Sen. Richard Roth, and Jose Medina. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5 unless one candidate receives more than 50% of the vote and wins outright in the primary.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Torres’ campaign has raised $20,000 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Debbie Walsh
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Walsh’s campaign has raised $6,500 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Sen. Richard Roth
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Sen. Roth’s campaign has raised $297,000 as of January 2024, and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. 

    Opposing candidate: Jose Medina
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Medina’s campaign has raised $132,000 as of January 2024 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests. Medina served in the California State Assembly from 2012-2022.

    The District


    County: Riverside is California’s 5th most populous county. District 1 includes the cities of Riverside, Wildomar, and Perris. 

    Governance structure: Riverside’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 2.4 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Riverside County is governed by the Board of Supervisors. 

    The Position


    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities which are administered by their own city councils and unincorporated areas which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total. 


    Graciela Torres

    Elect Graciela Torres for Supervisor to put Riverside County on the right track for progress. 

    Graciela “Gracie” Torres’ track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Riverside County and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Torres has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, California Women’s List, and Run for Something. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Assm. Corey Jackson, Fresno Councilmember Nelson Esparza, and Palm Springs Councilmember Christy Holstege.

    Electoral history: Torres won her most recent race for Western Municipal Water District in a nonpartisan race, finishing as the top vote-getter in a field of 5 candidates with 58% of the vote.

    Top issues: Homelessness, public safety, infrastructure, and the economy.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Gracie Torres is an environmental planner and a compliance expert, and sits on the Western Municipal Water District, which she does because of her passion for environmental science and quality water for her community. She co-founded the organization IEWorks, which is dedicated to investing in workforce development in the water sector. She is the youngest and first ever immigrant Latina elected to the Western Municipal Water District.

    Other background: Torres has lived in Riverside since she was an adolescent. She earned her BA and master’s degree from California State University San Bernardino.

    The Race

    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the nonpartisan March 5 primary, including Graciela Torres, Debbie Walsh, State Sen. Richard Roth, and Jose Medina. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5 unless one candidate receives more than 50% of the vote and wins outright in the primary.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Torres’ campaign has raised $20,000 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Debbie Walsh
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Walsh’s campaign has raised $6,500 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Sen. Richard Roth
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Sen. Roth’s campaign has raised $297,000 as of January 2024, and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. 

    Opposing candidate: Jose Medina
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Medina’s campaign has raised $132,000 as of January 2024 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests. Medina served in the California State Assembly from 2012-2022.

    The District

    County: Riverside is California’s 5th most populous county. District 1 includes the cities of Riverside, Wildomar, and Perris. 

    Governance structure: Riverside’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 2.4 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Riverside County is governed by the Board of Supervisors. 

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities which are administered by their own city councils and unincorporated areas which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total. 

    Elect Graciela Torres for Supervisor to put Riverside County on the right track for progress. 



    Graciela “Gracie” Torres’ track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Riverside County and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Torres has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, California Women’s List, and Run for Something. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Assm. Corey Jackson, Fresno Councilmember Nelson Esparza, and Palm Springs Councilmember Christy Holstege.

    Electoral history: Torres won her most recent race for Western Municipal Water District in a nonpartisan race, finishing as the top vote-getter in a field of 5 candidates with 58% of the vote.

    Top issues: Homelessness, public safety, infrastructure, and the economy.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Gracie Torres is an environmental planner and a compliance expert, and sits on the Western Municipal Water District, which she does because of her passion for environmental science and quality water for her community. She co-founded the organization IEWorks, which is dedicated to investing in workforce development in the water sector. She is the youngest and first ever immigrant Latina elected to the Western Municipal Water District.

    Other background: Torres has lived in Riverside since she was an adolescent. She earned her BA and master’s degree from California State University San Bernardino.

    The Race


    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the nonpartisan March 5 primary, including Graciela Torres, Debbie Walsh, State Sen. Richard Roth, and Jose Medina. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5 unless one candidate receives more than 50% of the vote and wins outright in the primary.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Torres’ campaign has raised $20,000 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Debbie Walsh
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Walsh’s campaign has raised $6,500 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Sen. Richard Roth
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Sen. Roth’s campaign has raised $297,000 as of January 2024, and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. 

    Opposing candidate: Jose Medina
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Medina’s campaign has raised $132,000 as of January 2024 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests. Medina served in the California State Assembly from 2012-2022.

    The District


    County: Riverside is California’s 5th most populous county. District 1 includes the cities of Riverside, Wildomar, and Perris. 

    Governance structure: Riverside’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 2.4 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Riverside County is governed by the Board of Supervisors. 

    The Position


    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities which are administered by their own city councils and unincorporated areas which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total. 


    Graciela Torres

    Elect Graciela Torres for Supervisor to put Riverside County on the right track for progress. 

    Graciela “Gracie” Torres’ track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of Riverside County and will govern effectively in the best interests of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Torres has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including California Working Families Party, California Women’s List, and Run for Something. She has also received the endorsement of some elected leaders, including Assm. Corey Jackson, Fresno Councilmember Nelson Esparza, and Palm Springs Councilmember Christy Holstege.

    Electoral history: Torres won her most recent race for Western Municipal Water District in a nonpartisan race, finishing as the top vote-getter in a field of 5 candidates with 58% of the vote.

    Top issues: Homelessness, public safety, infrastructure, and the economy.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Gracie Torres is an environmental planner and a compliance expert, and sits on the Western Municipal Water District, which she does because of her passion for environmental science and quality water for her community. She co-founded the organization IEWorks, which is dedicated to investing in workforce development in the water sector. She is the youngest and first ever immigrant Latina elected to the Western Municipal Water District.

    Other background: Torres has lived in Riverside since she was an adolescent. She earned her BA and master’s degree from California State University San Bernardino.

    The Race

    Primary election: There are four candidates running in the nonpartisan March 5 primary, including Graciela Torres, Debbie Walsh, State Sen. Richard Roth, and Jose Medina. The top two vote recipients will advance to the general election on November 5 unless one candidate receives more than 50% of the vote and wins outright in the primary.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Torres’ campaign has raised $20,000 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Debbie Walsh
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Walsh’s campaign has raised $6,500 as of January 2024, and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests.

    Opposing candidate: Sen. Richard Roth
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Sen. Roth’s campaign has raised $297,000 as of January 2024, and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. 

    Opposing candidate: Jose Medina
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Medina’s campaign has raised $132,000 as of January 2024 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC interests. Medina served in the California State Assembly from 2012-2022.

    The District

    County: Riverside is California’s 5th most populous county. District 1 includes the cities of Riverside, Wildomar, and Perris. 

    Governance structure: Riverside’s Board of Supervisors oversees the needs of 2.4 million people and manages an estimated budget of $8.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, Riverside County is governed by the Board of Supervisors. 

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by Boards of Supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities which are administered by their own city councils and unincorporated areas which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total. 

  • Courage Score: https://couragescore.org
  • No Position

    Vote on Proposition 1

  • Proposition 1 will establish a $6.4 billion bond to fund an increase in the number of treatment beds and housing units the state provides to individuals struggling with mental health and addiction, and to direct counties to reallocate their Mental Health Services Act funding to address the local housing shortage.



    In an effort to address an ongoing housing shortage and addiction crisis in the state, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed two bills—SB326 and AB531—to send a $6.4 billion bond measure to voters in March. This bond would be used to increase capacity in health care and housing across the state by adding 6,800 behavioral health treatment beds, building 4,300 housing units, and creating 26,000 outpatient treatment slots for Californians. Proposition 1 would also require each county to redirect 30% of its Mental Health Services Act funding to housing, including creating new real estate development, and the provision of rental subsidies. Mental Health Services Act funds are raised through a tax on millionaires in the state, and the reallocated portion is expected to total $1 billion annually across the state. Overall, Proposition 1 aims to reduce homelessness and tent encampments, and provide support to individuals who do not have the resources to address behavioral health challenges. 

    Top support for Proposition 1:


    - The legislation that sent Proposition 1 to voters received overwhelming support from the state legislature. SB326 received a unanimous floor vote in the Senate, and earned 68 floor votes in the Assembly. AB531 received 35 floor votes in the Senate, and 66 floor votes in the Assembly. 
    - YES ON 1 has received over $10.7 million in donations, primarily through Yes on Prop 1—Governor Newsom’s Ballot Measure Committee. The committee has received donations from police, fossil fuel, real estate, and corporate PAC interests, including from California Correctional Peace Officers Association Truth in American Government Fund, AirBnB, Google, and PG&E. 
    - Gov. Gavin Newsom has enthusiastically supported Proposition 1, arguing that the establishment of more treatment options and housing units has the potential to have a significant impact on marginalized populations within the state over time, and is a humane approach to this ongoing public health crisis. 

    Top opposition to Proposition 1:


    - Groups like Disability Rights California and the League of Women Voters California are concerned that this policy could be interpreted to permit involuntary treatment of mental health and addiction patients in locked facilities. They argue that this aspect of the bill is regressive and is the result of hasty passage, a lack of meaningful legislative debate, and limited input from community groups. Republican activist Carl DeMaio, his conservative PAC Reform California, and the anti-tax Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association are also opposing Proposition 1.
    - Some housing and homeless advocates have criticized Proposition 1’s narrow projected impact on a statewide homeless population that is estimated to include 180,000 people. With over half of the proposed new housing units earmarked for veterans, the number of homeless civilians who will benefit from this program is statistically insignificant.
    - Proposition 1 has raised concerns among opponents—including several counties and county leaders—around its mandate that 30% of county Mental Health Services Act funding be allocated to address local housing shortages. Stripping funding out of this budget line to fund housing programs will disrupt existing and effective county mental health programs, many of which are tailored to serve marginalized local populations, including Indigenous communities, members of the LGBTQIA+ community, and people of color. 

    Proposition 1 will establish a $6.4 billion bond to fund an increase in the number of treatment beds and housing units the state provides to individuals struggling with mental health and addiction, and to direct counties to reallocate their Mental Health Services Act funding to address the local housing shortage.



    In an effort to address an ongoing housing shortage and addiction crisis in the state, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed two bills—SB326 and AB531—to send a $6.4 billion bond measure to voters in March. This bond would be used to increase capacity in health care and housing across the state by adding 6,800 behavioral health treatment beds, building 4,300 housing units, and creating 26,000 outpatient treatment slots for Californians. Proposition 1 would also require each county to redirect 30% of its Mental Health Services Act funding to housing, including creating new real estate development, and the provision of rental subsidies. Mental Health Services Act funds are raised through a tax on millionaires in the state, and the reallocated portion is expected to total $1 billion annually across the state. Overall, Proposition 1 aims to reduce homelessness and tent encampments, and provide support to individuals who do not have the resources to address behavioral health challenges. 

    Top support for Proposition 1:


    - The legislation that sent Proposition 1 to voters received overwhelming support from the state legislature. SB326 received a unanimous floor vote in the Senate, and earned 68 floor votes in the Assembly. AB531 received 35 floor votes in the Senate, and 66 floor votes in the Assembly. 
    - YES ON 1 has received over $10.7 million in donations, primarily through Yes on Prop 1—Governor Newsom’s Ballot Measure Committee. The committee has received donations from police, fossil fuel, real estate, and corporate PAC interests, including from California Correctional Peace Officers Association Truth in American Government Fund, AirBnB, Google, and PG&E. 
    - Gov. Gavin Newsom has enthusiastically supported Proposition 1, arguing that the establishment of more treatment options and housing units has the potential to have a significant impact on marginalized populations within the state over time, and is a humane approach to this ongoing public health crisis. 

    Top opposition to Proposition 1:


    - Groups like Disability Rights California and the League of Women Voters California are concerned that this policy could be interpreted to permit involuntary treatment of mental health and addiction patients in locked facilities. They argue that this aspect of the bill is regressive and is the result of hasty passage, a lack of meaningful legislative debate, and limited input from community groups. Republican activist Carl DeMaio, his conservative PAC Reform California, and the anti-tax Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association are also opposing Proposition 1.
    - Some housing and homeless advocates have criticized Proposition 1’s narrow projected impact on a statewide homeless population that is estimated to include 180,000 people. With over half of the proposed new housing units earmarked for veterans, the number of homeless civilians who will benefit from this program is statistically insignificant.
    - Proposition 1 has raised concerns among opponents—including several counties and county leaders—around its mandate that 30% of county Mental Health Services Act funding be allocated to address local housing shortages. Stripping funding out of this budget line to fund housing programs will disrupt existing and effective county mental health programs, many of which are tailored to serve marginalized local populations, including Indigenous communities, members of the LGBTQIA+ community, and people of color. 

    Proposition 1

    Proposition 1 will establish a $6.4 billion bond to fund an increase in the number of treatment beds and housing units the state provides to individuals struggling with mental health and addiction, and to direct counties to reallocate their Mental Health Services Act funding to address t

    Proposition 1

    Proposition 1 will establish a $6.4 billion bond to fund an increase in the number of treatment beds and housing units the state provides to individuals struggling with mental health and addiction, and to direct counties to reallocate their Mental Health Services Act funding to address t