Congress

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below congressional districts on your ballot.

  • Linda Sanchez

    Reelect Congressional Representative Linda Sanchez to keep CD-38 on the right track for progress.

     

    Linda Sanchez

    Reelect Congressional Representative Linda Sanchez to keep CD-38 on the right track for progress.

     

    Linda Sanchez

    Reelect Congressional Representative Linda Sanchez to keep CD-38 on the right track for progress.

     

  • Katie Porter

    Reelect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CA-47 moving toward progress.

     

    Katie Porter

    Reelect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CA-47 moving toward progress.

     

    Katie Porter

    Reelect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CA-47 moving toward progress.

     

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

  • Elizabeth Alcantar

    Elect Elizabeth Alcantar to push AD-64 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 64th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 17% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 65% Latino, 10% Asian, and 3% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-64 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.

    The Race

    There are five candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Elizabeth Alcantar and other Democrat challengers Blanca Pacheco, Ana Valencia, Roberto “Rob” Cancio, and Republican challenger Raul Ortiz, Jr. Ortiz’s platform includes anti-abortion positions and vaccine-conspiracy theories.

     

    Our Endorsement

    Elizabeth Alcantar, a community organizer and mayor of Cudahy City, is a lifelong resident of Southeast Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to fight for the needs of Southeast Los Angeles communities and to work for an equitable future for all Californians. Alcantar was elected to Cudahy City Council in 2018, was consequently named vice mayor, and in 2020, she was appointed mayor. She is the first Latina and the youngest person to serve as mayor of Cudahy.  

    Alcantar works with the Coalition for Human Immigrant Rights, where she educates and organizes the community around immigration and ensures that immigrant community members know their rights. Throughout her studies, she worked with students and alumni to host educational workshops on applying to college and obtaining financial aid, and she fundraised for scholarships for Cudahy students. She continued her advocacy work alongside car-wash workers and went on to serve as a field deputy for Supervisor Hilda L. Solis, former secretary of labor.

    As mayor of Cudahy, she led the city through the Delta fuel dump and the COVID-19 pandemic. On the Cudahy City Council, Alcantar has worked on local city ordinances that promote environmental justice and housing justice issues, including rent stabilization, anti-eviction, and anti-displacement. She is a founding member of the Southeast Los Angeles United (SELA United) coalition of elected officials representing cities in Southeast Los Angeles that came together to gain access to COVID-19 testing and vaccinations for their residents. Alcantar represents the City of Cudahy on the Gateway Council of Governments, the Hub Cities Job Joint Powers Authority, and AQMD’s AB617 Community Steering Committee, while serving on the board of directors for California League of Cities, Women’s Caucus.

    Alcantar has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups and leaders, including ACCE, Action, Communities for a Better Environment Action, Stonewall Democratic Club, California Teachers Association, LA Federation of Labor, SEIU CA, UFCW Local 324, and the California Legislative Progressive Caucus. She is also endorsed by many local elected leaders in Bell City, Commerce, Cudahy, Huntington Park, Lynwood, Maywood, Montebello, Santa Ana, South Gate City, and Compton. Based on our analysis, Alcantar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-64 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

    Elizabeth Alcantar

    Elect Elizabeth Alcantar to push AD-64 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 64th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 17% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 65% Latino, 10% Asian, and 3% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-64 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.

    The Race

    There are five candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Elizabeth Alcantar and other Democrat challengers Blanca Pacheco, Ana Valencia, Roberto “Rob” Cancio, and Republican challenger Raul Ortiz, Jr. Ortiz’s platform includes anti-abortion positions and vaccine-conspiracy theories.

     

    Our Endorsement

    Elizabeth Alcantar, a community organizer and mayor of Cudahy City, is a lifelong resident of Southeast Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to fight for the needs of Southeast Los Angeles communities and to work for an equitable future for all Californians. Alcantar was elected to Cudahy City Council in 2018, was consequently named vice mayor, and in 2020, she was appointed mayor. She is the first Latina and the youngest person to serve as mayor of Cudahy.  

    Alcantar works with the Coalition for Human Immigrant Rights, where she educates and organizes the community around immigration and ensures that immigrant community members know their rights. Throughout her studies, she worked with students and alumni to host educational workshops on applying to college and obtaining financial aid, and she fundraised for scholarships for Cudahy students. She continued her advocacy work alongside car-wash workers and went on to serve as a field deputy for Supervisor Hilda L. Solis, former secretary of labor.

    As mayor of Cudahy, she led the city through the Delta fuel dump and the COVID-19 pandemic. On the Cudahy City Council, Alcantar has worked on local city ordinances that promote environmental justice and housing justice issues, including rent stabilization, anti-eviction, and anti-displacement. She is a founding member of the Southeast Los Angeles United (SELA United) coalition of elected officials representing cities in Southeast Los Angeles that came together to gain access to COVID-19 testing and vaccinations for their residents. Alcantar represents the City of Cudahy on the Gateway Council of Governments, the Hub Cities Job Joint Powers Authority, and AQMD’s AB617 Community Steering Committee, while serving on the board of directors for California League of Cities, Women’s Caucus.

    Alcantar has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups and leaders, including ACCE, Action, Communities for a Better Environment Action, Stonewall Democratic Club, California Teachers Association, LA Federation of Labor, SEIU CA, UFCW Local 324, and the California Legislative Progressive Caucus. She is also endorsed by many local elected leaders in Bell City, Commerce, Cudahy, Huntington Park, Lynwood, Maywood, Montebello, Santa Ana, South Gate City, and Compton. Based on our analysis, Alcantar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-64 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

    Elizabeth Alcantar

    Elect Elizabeth Alcantar to push AD-64 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 64th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 17% are Republican and 54% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 65% Latino, 10% Asian, and 3% Black. The most recent election results show that AD-64 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 32 points.

    The Race

    There are five candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Elizabeth Alcantar and other Democrat challengers Blanca Pacheco, Ana Valencia, Roberto “Rob” Cancio, and Republican challenger Raul Ortiz, Jr. Ortiz’s platform includes anti-abortion positions and vaccine-conspiracy theories.

     

    Our Endorsement

    Elizabeth Alcantar, a community organizer and mayor of Cudahy City, is a lifelong resident of Southeast Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to fight for the needs of Southeast Los Angeles communities and to work for an equitable future for all Californians. Alcantar was elected to Cudahy City Council in 2018, was consequently named vice mayor, and in 2020, she was appointed mayor. She is the first Latina and the youngest person to serve as mayor of Cudahy.  

    Alcantar works with the Coalition for Human Immigrant Rights, where she educates and organizes the community around immigration and ensures that immigrant community members know their rights. Throughout her studies, she worked with students and alumni to host educational workshops on applying to college and obtaining financial aid, and she fundraised for scholarships for Cudahy students. She continued her advocacy work alongside car-wash workers and went on to serve as a field deputy for Supervisor Hilda L. Solis, former secretary of labor.

    As mayor of Cudahy, she led the city through the Delta fuel dump and the COVID-19 pandemic. On the Cudahy City Council, Alcantar has worked on local city ordinances that promote environmental justice and housing justice issues, including rent stabilization, anti-eviction, and anti-displacement. She is a founding member of the Southeast Los Angeles United (SELA United) coalition of elected officials representing cities in Southeast Los Angeles that came together to gain access to COVID-19 testing and vaccinations for their residents. Alcantar represents the City of Cudahy on the Gateway Council of Governments, the Hub Cities Job Joint Powers Authority, and AQMD’s AB617 Community Steering Committee, while serving on the board of directors for California League of Cities, Women’s Caucus.

    Alcantar has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups and leaders, including ACCE, Action, Communities for a Better Environment Action, Stonewall Democratic Club, California Teachers Association, LA Federation of Labor, SEIU CA, UFCW Local 324, and the California Legislative Progressive Caucus. She is also endorsed by many local elected leaders in Bell City, Commerce, Cudahy, Huntington Park, Lynwood, Maywood, Montebello, Santa Ana, South Gate City, and Compton. Based on our analysis, Alcantar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-64 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Endorsed by Courage California
  • Bulmaro Vicente

    Elect Bulmaro Vicente to push AD-68 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 68th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 21% are Republican and 51% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 56% Latino, 12% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-68 is 4% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-68 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 31 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are four candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Bulmaro Vicente, Democrat Avelino Valencia and Republicans James Wallace and Mike Tardif. Bulmaro’s campaign has raised over $8,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate money. Valencia’s campaign has not yet filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State, but he has taken money from police groups in the past.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Bulmaro Vicente, a former Police Review Commissioner for the City of Berkeley, was born and raised in Santa Ana. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to be a champion for real change in the district, including around labor, the environment, and housing. Bulmaro has not run for office previously.

    Bulmaro is the current policy director for Chispa, an organization for young Latinx people in Orange County. He has been involved in district issues since high school, including interning with labor unions to fight for better worker wages, and he has worked in housing, immigration, and police accountability, as well as in local and state fights to protect tenants. He helped pass a historic police decertification bill (SB2) and helped lead the Santa Ana People’s Budget Platform in 2020. If elected, Vicente pledges to advocate for COVID-19 sick pay and better worker protections as well as to reinstate the COVID-19 eviction moratorium.

    Bulmaro has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups and leaders in the district, including Orange County Civic Engagement Table Action, Mijente, California Working Families Party, Orange County Lavender Democrats, and Anaheim City Councilmember José Moreno. Based on our analysis, Bulmaro’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-68 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Bulmaro Vicente

    Elect Bulmaro Vicente to push AD-68 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 68th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 21% are Republican and 51% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 56% Latino, 12% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-68 is 4% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-68 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 31 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are four candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Bulmaro Vicente, Democrat Avelino Valencia and Republicans James Wallace and Mike Tardif. Bulmaro’s campaign has raised over $8,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate money. Valencia’s campaign has not yet filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State, but he has taken money from police groups in the past.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Bulmaro Vicente, a former Police Review Commissioner for the City of Berkeley, was born and raised in Santa Ana. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to be a champion for real change in the district, including around labor, the environment, and housing. Bulmaro has not run for office previously.

    Bulmaro is the current policy director for Chispa, an organization for young Latinx people in Orange County. He has been involved in district issues since high school, including interning with labor unions to fight for better worker wages, and he has worked in housing, immigration, and police accountability, as well as in local and state fights to protect tenants. He helped pass a historic police decertification bill (SB2) and helped lead the Santa Ana People’s Budget Platform in 2020. If elected, Vicente pledges to advocate for COVID-19 sick pay and better worker protections as well as to reinstate the COVID-19 eviction moratorium.

    Bulmaro has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups and leaders in the district, including Orange County Civic Engagement Table Action, Mijente, California Working Families Party, Orange County Lavender Democrats, and Anaheim City Councilmember José Moreno. Based on our analysis, Bulmaro’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-68 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

    Bulmaro Vicente

    Elect Bulmaro Vicente to push AD-68 in the right direction.

     

     

    The Position


    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

     

     

     

    The District


    California’s 68th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Democrats typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 21% are Republican and 51% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 56% Latino, 12% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-68 is 4% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-68 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 40 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 31 points.

     

     

     

     

    The Race


    There are four candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Bulmaro Vicente, Democrat Avelino Valencia and Republicans James Wallace and Mike Tardif. Bulmaro’s campaign has raised over $8,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, fossil fuel, or corporate money. Valencia’s campaign has not yet filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State, but he has taken money from police groups in the past.

     

     

     

     

    Our Endorsement


    Bulmaro Vicente, a former Police Review Commissioner for the City of Berkeley, was born and raised in Santa Ana. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to be a champion for real change in the district, including around labor, the environment, and housing. Bulmaro has not run for office previously.

    Bulmaro is the current policy director for Chispa, an organization for young Latinx people in Orange County. He has been involved in district issues since high school, including interning with labor unions to fight for better worker wages, and he has worked in housing, immigration, and police accountability, as well as in local and state fights to protect tenants. He helped pass a historic police decertification bill (SB2) and helped lead the Santa Ana People’s Budget Platform in 2020. If elected, Vicente pledges to advocate for COVID-19 sick pay and better worker protections as well as to reinstate the COVID-19 eviction moratorium.

    Bulmaro has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups and leaders in the district, including Orange County Civic Engagement Table Action, Mijente, California Working Families Party, Orange County Lavender Democrats, and Anaheim City Councilmember José Moreno. Based on our analysis, Bulmaro’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-68 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

     

     

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen

    Elect Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen to push AD-70 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 70th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Republicans typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 33% are Republican and 37% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 25% Latino, 40% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-70 is 6% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-70 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2020 by 2 points and for John Cox governor in 2018 by 4 points.

     

    The Race

    There are six candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen and Republicans Kimberly Ho, Ted Bui, and Tri Ta. Nguyen’s campaign has raised $2,363,748 and is not funded by corporate PACs or the fossil fuel industry. She has accepted donations from the real estate industry and police unions. The campaigns of Ho, Bui, and Ta have not committed to refusing fossil fuel or corporate PAC money, and all have received donations from the real estate industry. Ho has also received police money.

     

    The Recommendation

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen, a cancer scientist and mayor pro tem of Garden Grove, is from Saigon, Vietnam, and has lived in Garden Grove, CA, since 1995. According to campaign materials, she is running for election because she wants to help preserve upward mobility for her constituents, who have been pressed by the costs of health care, college tuition, and family care. Nguyen has run for office previously, and won her first race for Garden Grove City Council. She lost her first race for State Assembly against the Republican incumbent by 8 points in a more Republican district. 

    Nguyen ran for city council because she was frustrated by the lack of outreach and communication from the council to the local community, especially Vietnamese residents. On the Garden Grove City Council, she supported direct COVID-19 relief for renters and small businesses, as well as funding for nonprofits providing direct assistance in the district. She is a longtime community activist in the Vietnamese and Asian American communities, serving on the board and leadership teams of several Asian American interest organizations, including the Lunar New Year TET Festival and the Vietnamese Young Marines.

    Nguyen has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Equality California, and labor unions, like NUHW, United Domestic Workers, and Unite Here Local 11. She is also endorsed by the Garden Grove Police Officers Association. Despite Nguyen’s relationship with police unions and lack of campaign-finance pledges, this is a key opportunity to flip this Orange County seat from Republican to Democratic. Based on our analysis, Nguyen’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-70 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen

    Elect Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen to push AD-70 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 70th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Republicans typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 33% are Republican and 37% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 25% Latino, 40% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-70 is 6% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-70 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2020 by 2 points and for John Cox governor in 2018 by 4 points.

     

    The Race

    There are six candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen and Republicans Kimberly Ho, Ted Bui, and Tri Ta. Nguyen’s campaign has raised $2,363,748 and is not funded by corporate PACs or the fossil fuel industry. She has accepted donations from the real estate industry and police unions. The campaigns of Ho, Bui, and Ta have not committed to refusing fossil fuel or corporate PAC money, and all have received donations from the real estate industry. Ho has also received police money.

     

    The Recommendation

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen, a cancer scientist and mayor pro tem of Garden Grove, is from Saigon, Vietnam, and has lived in Garden Grove, CA, since 1995. According to campaign materials, she is running for election because she wants to help preserve upward mobility for her constituents, who have been pressed by the costs of health care, college tuition, and family care. Nguyen has run for office previously, and won her first race for Garden Grove City Council. She lost her first race for State Assembly against the Republican incumbent by 8 points in a more Republican district. 

    Nguyen ran for city council because she was frustrated by the lack of outreach and communication from the council to the local community, especially Vietnamese residents. On the Garden Grove City Council, she supported direct COVID-19 relief for renters and small businesses, as well as funding for nonprofits providing direct assistance in the district. She is a longtime community activist in the Vietnamese and Asian American communities, serving on the board and leadership teams of several Asian American interest organizations, including the Lunar New Year TET Festival and the Vietnamese Young Marines.

    Nguyen has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Equality California, and labor unions, like NUHW, United Domestic Workers, and Unite Here Local 11. She is also endorsed by the Garden Grove Police Officers Association. Despite Nguyen’s relationship with police unions and lack of campaign-finance pledges, this is a key opportunity to flip this Orange County seat from Republican to Democratic. Based on our analysis, Nguyen’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-70 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen

    Elect Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen to push AD-70 in the right direction.

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant.

     

    The District

    California’s 70th Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Republicans typically hold this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 33% are Republican and 37% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 25% Latino, 40% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-70 is 6% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-70 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2020 by 2 points and for John Cox governor in 2018 by 4 points.

     

    The Race

    There are six candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen and Republicans Kimberly Ho, Ted Bui, and Tri Ta. Nguyen’s campaign has raised $2,363,748 and is not funded by corporate PACs or the fossil fuel industry. She has accepted donations from the real estate industry and police unions. The campaigns of Ho, Bui, and Ta have not committed to refusing fossil fuel or corporate PAC money, and all have received donations from the real estate industry. Ho has also received police money.

     

    The Recommendation

    Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen, a cancer scientist and mayor pro tem of Garden Grove, is from Saigon, Vietnam, and has lived in Garden Grove, CA, since 1995. According to campaign materials, she is running for election because she wants to help preserve upward mobility for her constituents, who have been pressed by the costs of health care, college tuition, and family care. Nguyen has run for office previously, and won her first race for Garden Grove City Council. She lost her first race for State Assembly against the Republican incumbent by 8 points in a more Republican district. 

    Nguyen ran for city council because she was frustrated by the lack of outreach and communication from the council to the local community, especially Vietnamese residents. On the Garden Grove City Council, she supported direct COVID-19 relief for renters and small businesses, as well as funding for nonprofits providing direct assistance in the district. She is a longtime community activist in the Vietnamese and Asian American communities, serving on the board and leadership teams of several Asian American interest organizations, including the Lunar New Year TET Festival and the Vietnamese Young Marines.

    Nguyen has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Equality California, and labor unions, like NUHW, United Domestic Workers, and Unite Here Local 11. She is also endorsed by the Garden Grove Police Officers Association. Despite Nguyen’s relationship with police unions and lack of campaign-finance pledges, this is a key opportunity to flip this Orange County seat from Republican to Democratic. Based on our analysis, Nguyen’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-70 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Cottie Petrie-Norris

    Reelect State Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris to keep AD-73 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 73rd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 27% are Republican and 40% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 17% Latino, 28% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-73 is 11% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-73 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 18 points.
    Under newly drawn district maps, incumbent Assemblymembers Cottie Petrie-Norris and Steven Choi, representing the 74th and 68th Districts respectively, are positioned as challengers in the new 73rd District.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris and Republican Incumbent Assemblymember Steven Choi. Assm. Petrie-Norris’s campaign has raised $1 million and has received donations from fossil fuel, police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. Assm. Choi’s campaign has raised $232,000 and has also received donations from fossil fuel, police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Petrie-Norris, a businessperson, is from San Diego County. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue her efforts to support economic growth and protect public health in the district. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Petrie-Norris represents AD-74 and won her 2020 reelection for that seat against Republican Diane Dixon by a narrow one-point margin.

    Assm. Petrie-Norris’s priorities for AD-74 this year have included 38 bills about climate and environmental protections, drug regulations, and health care. Of these, eight have been chaptered into law, 13 have died, and the rest remain in committee. She currently serves on five committees, including as chair of the Accountability and Administrative Review Committee. She is also chair of the two select committees, Small Business and Entrepreneurship, and Orange County Oil Spill. She scores a Lifetime CS of 29 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Petrie-Norris has supported very few progressive bills that made it to a vote this term. Specifically, she has not supported bills related to public banking, expanding the California Racial Justice Act of 2020 and other criminal-justice reforms, and creating minimum wage and working conditions standards for those in the fast-food industry. She also missed a vote on legislation related to providing free and accessible COVID-19 testing and vaccination. While she has pursued progressive action on education reform and climate protections, her voting record on criminal-justice reform and workers’ rights has demonstrated a more moderate approach. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Petrie-Norris was a business leader, working primarily in finance and technology. 

    Assm. Petrie-Norris has the endorsement of a few progressive groups in the district, including California Teachers Association and Sierra Club. She has also received the endorsement of local officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber, and State Treasurer Fiona Ma. She is also endorsed by a variety of police groups, including California Association of Highway Patrolmen, California Correctional Peace Officers Association, and PORAC. Similarly, she has received problematic campaign donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Amazon, and California Real Estate PAC. While the threat of Republican Incumbent Steven Choi’s potential policies outweighs Assm. Petrie-Norris’s moderate voting record and problematic endorsements, voters are strongly encouraged to continue to hold her accountable for legislative efforts that may not be in the best interest of her constituents. Based on our analysis, Assm. Petrie-Norris will continue to be a leader for the constituents of AD-73 and will govern effectively for this diverse district with consistent voter oversight.

    Cottie Petrie-Norris

    Reelect State Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris to keep AD-73 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 73rd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 27% are Republican and 40% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 17% Latino, 28% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-73 is 11% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-73 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 18 points.
    Under newly drawn district maps, incumbent Assemblymembers Cottie Petrie-Norris and Steven Choi, representing the 74th and 68th Districts respectively, are positioned as challengers in the new 73rd District.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris and Republican Incumbent Assemblymember Steven Choi. Assm. Petrie-Norris’s campaign has raised $1 million and has received donations from fossil fuel, police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. Assm. Choi’s campaign has raised $232,000 and has also received donations from fossil fuel, police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Petrie-Norris, a businessperson, is from San Diego County. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue her efforts to support economic growth and protect public health in the district. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Petrie-Norris represents AD-74 and won her 2020 reelection for that seat against Republican Diane Dixon by a narrow one-point margin.

    Assm. Petrie-Norris’s priorities for AD-74 this year have included 38 bills about climate and environmental protections, drug regulations, and health care. Of these, eight have been chaptered into law, 13 have died, and the rest remain in committee. She currently serves on five committees, including as chair of the Accountability and Administrative Review Committee. She is also chair of the two select committees, Small Business and Entrepreneurship, and Orange County Oil Spill. She scores a Lifetime CS of 29 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Petrie-Norris has supported very few progressive bills that made it to a vote this term. Specifically, she has not supported bills related to public banking, expanding the California Racial Justice Act of 2020 and other criminal-justice reforms, and creating minimum wage and working conditions standards for those in the fast-food industry. She also missed a vote on legislation related to providing free and accessible COVID-19 testing and vaccination. While she has pursued progressive action on education reform and climate protections, her voting record on criminal-justice reform and workers’ rights has demonstrated a more moderate approach. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Petrie-Norris was a business leader, working primarily in finance and technology. 

    Assm. Petrie-Norris has the endorsement of a few progressive groups in the district, including California Teachers Association and Sierra Club. She has also received the endorsement of local officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber, and State Treasurer Fiona Ma. She is also endorsed by a variety of police groups, including California Association of Highway Patrolmen, California Correctional Peace Officers Association, and PORAC. Similarly, she has received problematic campaign donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Amazon, and California Real Estate PAC. While the threat of Republican Incumbent Steven Choi’s potential policies outweighs Assm. Petrie-Norris’s moderate voting record and problematic endorsements, voters are strongly encouraged to continue to hold her accountable for legislative efforts that may not be in the best interest of her constituents. Based on our analysis, Assm. Petrie-Norris will continue to be a leader for the constituents of AD-73 and will govern effectively for this diverse district with consistent voter oversight.

    Cottie Petrie-Norris

    Reelect State Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris to keep AD-73 on the right track for progress. 

     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or the Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 56 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and four seats are currently vacant. 

     

    The District

    California’s 73rd Assembly District includes parts of Orange County. Prior to redistricting, Republicans typically held this district. Of the registered voters in this district, 27% are Republican and 40% are Democrat, and the district’s demographic breakdown is 17% Latino, 28% Asian, and 2% Black. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-73 is 11% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle. The most recent election results show that AD-73 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 18 points.
    Under newly drawn district maps, incumbent Assemblymembers Cottie Petrie-Norris and Steven Choi, representing the 74th and 68th Districts respectively, are positioned as challengers in the new 73rd District.

     

    The Race

    There are two candidates running for this seat, including Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris and Republican Incumbent Assemblymember Steven Choi. Assm. Petrie-Norris’s campaign has raised $1 million and has received donations from fossil fuel, police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. Assm. Choi’s campaign has raised $232,000 and has also received donations from fossil fuel, police, real estate, and corporate PAC interests. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Assm. Petrie-Norris, a businessperson, is from San Diego County. According to campaign materials, she is running for reelection to continue her efforts to support economic growth and protect public health in the district. Prior to redistricting, Assm. Petrie-Norris represents AD-74 and won her 2020 reelection for that seat against Republican Diane Dixon by a narrow one-point margin.

    Assm. Petrie-Norris’s priorities for AD-74 this year have included 38 bills about climate and environmental protections, drug regulations, and health care. Of these, eight have been chaptered into law, 13 have died, and the rest remain in committee. She currently serves on five committees, including as chair of the Accountability and Administrative Review Committee. She is also chair of the two select committees, Small Business and Entrepreneurship, and Orange County Oil Spill. She scores a Lifetime CS of 29 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Petrie-Norris has supported very few progressive bills that made it to a vote this term. Specifically, she has not supported bills related to public banking, expanding the California Racial Justice Act of 2020 and other criminal-justice reforms, and creating minimum wage and working conditions standards for those in the fast-food industry. She also missed a vote on legislation related to providing free and accessible COVID-19 testing and vaccination. While she has pursued progressive action on education reform and climate protections, her voting record on criminal-justice reform and workers’ rights has demonstrated a more moderate approach. 

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assm. Petrie-Norris was a business leader, working primarily in finance and technology. 

    Assm. Petrie-Norris has the endorsement of a few progressive groups in the district, including California Teachers Association and Sierra Club. She has also received the endorsement of local officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber, and State Treasurer Fiona Ma. She is also endorsed by a variety of police groups, including California Association of Highway Patrolmen, California Correctional Peace Officers Association, and PORAC. Similarly, she has received problematic campaign donations from a variety of problematic funders, including Sempra Energy, Amazon, and California Real Estate PAC. While the threat of Republican Incumbent Steven Choi’s potential policies outweighs Assm. Petrie-Norris’s moderate voting record and problematic endorsements, voters are strongly encouraged to continue to hold her accountable for legislative efforts that may not be in the best interest of her constituents. Based on our analysis, Assm. Petrie-Norris will continue to be a leader for the constituents of AD-73 and will govern effectively for this diverse district with consistent voter oversight.

State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.