County District Races

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county-districted races on your ballot.

  • DeJonaé Shaw

    Elect Supervisor DeJonaé Shaw to push San Bernardino County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to three terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    San Bernardino is California’s 5th most populous county. San Bernardino’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 2,181,654 people and manages an estimated budget of $7.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, San Bernardino is governed by the board of supervisors, who oversee the legislative priorities and municipal needs of the county. District 2 includes about 400,000 people, as well as the cities of Rancho Cucamonga and Fontana. 

     

    The Race

    There are five candidates running for this seat, including DeJonaé Shaw and opponents Jesse Armendarez, Nadia Renner, Luis Cetina, and Eric Coker. Shaw’s campaign has raised $78,319 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police. Armendarez’s campaign has not committed to refusing money from corporate PACs or the fossil fuel industry, and has received donations from the police as well as tens of thousands of dollars from the real estate industry. Cetina’s campaign has also accepted donations from the real estate industry. Renner and Cetinas’s campaigns have received only five donations apiece in this calendar year.

     

    The Recommendation

    DeJonaé Shaw is from California. According to campaign materials, Shaw is running for election to fight for good-paying jobs, cleaner air, and healthy neighborhoods where everyone can thrive. 

    Shaw is a licensed vocational nurse, and worked in health care throughout the pandemic. She is a longtime supporter of youth advocacy and education: Shaw founded the Greater Empire Pageants for young people in the area, and has worked with local organizations like the Young Women’s Empowerment Summit and Just Us 4 Youth. She has also served as a leader in her union as the vice chair of Legislation and Education, and on the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Next Gen Committee, aimed at increasing community solutions to policing.

    Shaw is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, including Inland Empire United, Planned Parenthood, CHIRLA Action Fund, the Sierra Club, and labor unions like SEIU, AFSCME, and NUHW. She is also endorsed by elected officials, including Senator Connie Leyva, Assemblymember Eloise Reyes, and many local leaders. Based on our analysis, DeJonaé Shaw’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of San Bernardino County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    DeJonaé Shaw

    Elect Supervisor DeJonaé Shaw to push San Bernardino County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to three terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    San Bernardino is California’s 5th most populous county. San Bernardino’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 2,181,654 people and manages an estimated budget of $7.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, San Bernardino is governed by the board of supervisors, who oversee the legislative priorities and municipal needs of the county. District 2 includes about 400,000 people, as well as the cities of Rancho Cucamonga and Fontana. 

     

    The Race

    There are five candidates running for this seat, including DeJonaé Shaw and opponents Jesse Armendarez, Nadia Renner, Luis Cetina, and Eric Coker. Shaw’s campaign has raised $78,319 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police. Armendarez’s campaign has not committed to refusing money from corporate PACs or the fossil fuel industry, and has received donations from the police as well as tens of thousands of dollars from the real estate industry. Cetina’s campaign has also accepted donations from the real estate industry. Renner and Cetinas’s campaigns have received only five donations apiece in this calendar year.

     

    The Recommendation

    DeJonaé Shaw is from California. According to campaign materials, Shaw is running for election to fight for good-paying jobs, cleaner air, and healthy neighborhoods where everyone can thrive. 

    Shaw is a licensed vocational nurse, and worked in health care throughout the pandemic. She is a longtime supporter of youth advocacy and education: Shaw founded the Greater Empire Pageants for young people in the area, and has worked with local organizations like the Young Women’s Empowerment Summit and Just Us 4 Youth. She has also served as a leader in her union as the vice chair of Legislation and Education, and on the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Next Gen Committee, aimed at increasing community solutions to policing.

    Shaw is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, including Inland Empire United, Planned Parenthood, CHIRLA Action Fund, the Sierra Club, and labor unions like SEIU, AFSCME, and NUHW. She is also endorsed by elected officials, including Senator Connie Leyva, Assemblymember Eloise Reyes, and many local leaders. Based on our analysis, DeJonaé Shaw’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of San Bernardino County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    DeJonaé Shaw

    Elect Supervisor DeJonaé Shaw to push San Bernardino County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to three terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    San Bernardino is California’s 5th most populous county. San Bernardino’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 2,181,654 people and manages an estimated budget of $7.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, San Bernardino is governed by the board of supervisors, who oversee the legislative priorities and municipal needs of the county. District 2 includes about 400,000 people, as well as the cities of Rancho Cucamonga and Fontana. 

     

    The Race

    There are five candidates running for this seat, including DeJonaé Shaw and opponents Jesse Armendarez, Nadia Renner, Luis Cetina, and Eric Coker. Shaw’s campaign has raised $78,319 and is not funded by corporate PACs, the fossil fuel industry, the real estate industry, or the police. Armendarez’s campaign has not committed to refusing money from corporate PACs or the fossil fuel industry, and has received donations from the police as well as tens of thousands of dollars from the real estate industry. Cetina’s campaign has also accepted donations from the real estate industry. Renner and Cetinas’s campaigns have received only five donations apiece in this calendar year.

     

    The Recommendation

    DeJonaé Shaw is from California. According to campaign materials, Shaw is running for election to fight for good-paying jobs, cleaner air, and healthy neighborhoods where everyone can thrive. 

    Shaw is a licensed vocational nurse, and worked in health care throughout the pandemic. She is a longtime supporter of youth advocacy and education: Shaw founded the Greater Empire Pageants for young people in the area, and has worked with local organizations like the Young Women’s Empowerment Summit and Just Us 4 Youth. She has also served as a leader in her union as the vice chair of Legislation and Education, and on the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Next Gen Committee, aimed at increasing community solutions to policing.

    Shaw is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, including Inland Empire United, Planned Parenthood, CHIRLA Action Fund, the Sierra Club, and labor unions like SEIU, AFSCME, and NUHW. She is also endorsed by elected officials, including Senator Connie Leyva, Assemblymember Eloise Reyes, and many local leaders. Based on our analysis, DeJonaé Shaw’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of San Bernardino County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Courage Score: https://couragescore.org
  • Connie Leyva

    Elect Connie Leyva to push San Bernardino County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    San Bernardino is California’s 5th most populous county. San Bernardino’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 2,181,654 people and manages an estimated budget of $7.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, San Bernardino is governed by the board of supervisors, which oversees the legislative priorities and municipal needs of the county. District 4 includes 477,000 residents, as well as the cities of Chino, Ontario, and Montclair. 

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including State Senator Connie Leyva and Incumbent Curt Hagman. Leyva’s campaign has raised $410,539 and is not funded by the real estate industry. She has accepted donations from the corporate PACs, police, and the fossil-fuel industry. Hagman has not filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State for the current election cycle. Hagman and his campaign were fined $10,000 in 2019 for campaign-finance violations, including spending money raised by a previous campaign and fundraising beyond the legal limit following the end of the election cycle. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Connie Leyva, a state senator and a union leader, is from Chino, CA. According to campaign materials, Leyva is running for election to fight for quality jobs, better schools, and safer neighborhoods, as well as to serve her local San Bernardino community. 

    Leyva is a sitting state senator and has demonstrated her progressive bonafides in the Senate: she has voted in favor of raising the minimum wage, lowering the cost of community college, and building more affordable housing, and has earned a lifetime Courage Score of 96 out of 100. In particular, she has acted as an advocate for gender equity, helping to author laws requiring pay equity, removing limitations on prosecuting sexual assault, banning secret settlements of campus assault cases, and increasing access to reproductive health care at public universities. While working as a grocery clerk, she joined the United Food and Commercial Workers. She later served as a union representative for UFCW and was eventually elected president, the first woman to hold the role. 

    Leyva is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Inland Empire United, the Sierra Club, and labor unions like UFCW, SEIU, and AFL-CIO. Based on our analysis, Leyva’s track record and policy positions 
    demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of San Bernardino County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

    Connie Leyva

    Elect Connie Leyva to push San Bernardino County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    San Bernardino is California’s 5th most populous county. San Bernardino’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 2,181,654 people and manages an estimated budget of $7.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, San Bernardino is governed by the board of supervisors, which oversees the legislative priorities and municipal needs of the county. District 4 includes 477,000 residents, as well as the cities of Chino, Ontario, and Montclair. 

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including State Senator Connie Leyva and Incumbent Curt Hagman. Leyva’s campaign has raised $410,539 and is not funded by the real estate industry. She has accepted donations from the corporate PACs, police, and the fossil-fuel industry. Hagman has not filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State for the current election cycle. Hagman and his campaign were fined $10,000 in 2019 for campaign-finance violations, including spending money raised by a previous campaign and fundraising beyond the legal limit following the end of the election cycle. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Connie Leyva, a state senator and a union leader, is from Chino, CA. According to campaign materials, Leyva is running for election to fight for quality jobs, better schools, and safer neighborhoods, as well as to serve her local San Bernardino community. 

    Leyva is a sitting state senator and has demonstrated her progressive bonafides in the Senate: she has voted in favor of raising the minimum wage, lowering the cost of community college, and building more affordable housing, and has earned a lifetime Courage Score of 96 out of 100. In particular, she has acted as an advocate for gender equity, helping to author laws requiring pay equity, removing limitations on prosecuting sexual assault, banning secret settlements of campus assault cases, and increasing access to reproductive health care at public universities. While working as a grocery clerk, she joined the United Food and Commercial Workers. She later served as a union representative for UFCW and was eventually elected president, the first woman to hold the role. 

    Leyva is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Inland Empire United, the Sierra Club, and labor unions like UFCW, SEIU, and AFL-CIO. Based on our analysis, Leyva’s track record and policy positions 
    demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of San Bernardino County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

    Connie Leyva

    Elect Connie Leyva to push San Bernardino County in the right direction for progress. 

     

    The Position

    Each of the 58 counties in California is governed by a five-person board of supervisors. A board of supervisors has legislative and executive power to manage county services and resources, including courts, jails, public health, and public lands. They also have quasi-judicial powers, which gives them the right to hold hearings, conduct investigations, and make decisions in a manner similar to judicial courts. Laws passed by boards of supervisors are generally called ordinances. Because counties include both incorporated cities, which are administered by their own city councils, and unincorporated areas, which are directly administered by the county, ordinances may or may not apply in different areas of the county. Supervisors are typically ‎limited to 3 terms, or 12 years in office total.

     

    The District

    San Bernardino is California’s 5th most populous county. San Bernardino’s board of supervisors oversees the needs of 2,181,654 people and manages an estimated budget of $7.6 billion annually. According to the County Charter, San Bernardino is governed by the board of supervisors, which oversees the legislative priorities and municipal needs of the county. District 4 includes 477,000 residents, as well as the cities of Chino, Ontario, and Montclair. 

     

    The Race

    There are three candidates running for this seat, including State Senator Connie Leyva and Incumbent Curt Hagman. Leyva’s campaign has raised $410,539 and is not funded by the real estate industry. She has accepted donations from the corporate PACs, police, and the fossil-fuel industry. Hagman has not filed any fundraising receipts with the Secretary of State for the current election cycle. Hagman and his campaign were fined $10,000 in 2019 for campaign-finance violations, including spending money raised by a previous campaign and fundraising beyond the legal limit following the end of the election cycle. 

     

    The Recommendation

    Connie Leyva, a state senator and a union leader, is from Chino, CA. According to campaign materials, Leyva is running for election to fight for quality jobs, better schools, and safer neighborhoods, as well as to serve her local San Bernardino community. 

    Leyva is a sitting state senator and has demonstrated her progressive bonafides in the Senate: she has voted in favor of raising the minimum wage, lowering the cost of community college, and building more affordable housing, and has earned a lifetime Courage Score of 96 out of 100. In particular, she has acted as an advocate for gender equity, helping to author laws requiring pay equity, removing limitations on prosecuting sexual assault, banning secret settlements of campus assault cases, and increasing access to reproductive health care at public universities. While working as a grocery clerk, she joined the United Food and Commercial Workers. She later served as a union representative for UFCW and was eventually elected president, the first woman to hold the role. 

    Leyva is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Inland Empire United, the Sierra Club, and labor unions like UFCW, SEIU, and AFL-CIO. Based on our analysis, Leyva’s track record and policy positions 
    demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of San Bernardino County and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.
     

  • Courage Score: https://couragescore.org