Courage California

Courage California

Courage California (formerly Courage Campaign) believes that California must be a beacon of progressive, equitable, and truly representative democracy. As the 5th largest economy in the world -- and the United States' largest and most diverse state -- California is uniquely positioned to serve as a model for the country. 

We must prove that democracy in the US can still solve the thorniest problems facing our state, our nation, and the world, while also serving ALL of our people -- regardless of race, gender, or economic status. To do so, Californians must have the information and infrastructure they need to hold elected officials accountable when they are not working for the public’s benefit, instead prioritizing corporate lobbyists and campaign contributors. 

Courage California, driven by our 1.4 million members, helps our great state reach its potential by calling out institutional corruption and oppression, improving coordination and collaboration between progressive organizations, and demanding that our state and local representatives be both accountable to and reflective of the Californians they seek to serve.

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

  • Liz Ortega

    Courage California endorses Liz Ortega for State Assembly to put AD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Liz Ortega’s organizing background and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Ortega has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Planned Parenthood, California Legislative Women’s Caucus, and many labor organizations. In addition, she has received the endorsement of many elected officials, including Attorney General Rob Bonta, Board of Equalization Member Malia Cohen, Assm. Alex Lee, and labor leader Dolores Huerta. She has also recently received the endorsement of her primary competitor, Jennifer Esteen.

    Electoral history: Ortega has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Job creation and economic growth, homelessness and housing, education, public safety, and environmental justice.

    Priority bills: Ortega has more than two decades of experience in labor leadership and working with progressive Democratic leaders and community organizations. As statewide political director for AFSCME Local 3299, the University of California’s largest employee union, Ortega ensured the passage of state legislation to preserve and protect essential service jobs at every UC campus. She is the first Latina elected as executive secretary–treasurer of the Alameda Labor Council, and in this role has fought for an equitable minimum wage to support working families. As a member of the Alameda County Workforce Investment Board, she helped job-seekers develop workplace skills and find employment. Ortega serves on the Alameda County Vaccine Equity Task Force, where she has secured paid sick leave and hazard pay for essential public safety, health providers, and frontline workers. During the pandemic, she focused her work on testing and vaccination efforts to ensure the safety of frontline workers.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Ortega is a labor organizer and community activist, which she does to form coalitions and develop strategies necessary to build union power. She was elected delegate to the Alameda Democratic Central Committee in 2014, and, in the two years that she served in that role, facilitated meetings and discussions between Democrats and labor leaders on issues facing their members.

    Other background: Ortega is a lifelong resident of the East Bay and currently lives in San Leandro. She came to the United States at the age of three, and understands the unique challenges that immigrant families face in attaining the American dream.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Liz Ortega (D), 32%; Shawn Kumagai (D), 24%; Jennifer Esteen (D), 22%; and Joseph Grcar (R) 22%. Liz Ortega and Shawn Kumagai will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Ortega’s campaign has raised $611,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Shawn Kumagai

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Kumagai’s campaign has raised $432,000 and is funded by a significant number of real estate donors, including California Real Estate PAC, Western Manufactured Housing Communities Association PAC, Shea Homes, and Novin Development Corporation.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 20th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda County.

    Voter registration: 57% Democrat, 13% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-20 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 24% Latino, 32% Asian, and 10% Black

    Recent election results: AD-20 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 52 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 50 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Liz Ortega

    Courage California endorses Liz Ortega for State Assembly to put AD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Liz Ortega’s organizing background and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Ortega has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Planned Parenthood, California Legislative Women’s Caucus, and many labor organizations. In addition, she has received the endorsement of many elected officials, including Attorney General Rob Bonta, Board of Equalization Member Malia Cohen, Assm. Alex Lee, and labor leader Dolores Huerta. She has also recently received the endorsement of her primary competitor, Jennifer Esteen.

    Electoral history: Ortega has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Job creation and economic growth, homelessness and housing, education, public safety, and environmental justice.

    Priority bills: Ortega has more than two decades of experience in labor leadership and working with progressive Democratic leaders and community organizations. As statewide political director for AFSCME Local 3299, the University of California’s largest employee union, Ortega ensured the passage of state legislation to preserve and protect essential service jobs at every UC campus. She is the first Latina elected as executive secretary–treasurer of the Alameda Labor Council, and in this role has fought for an equitable minimum wage to support working families. As a member of the Alameda County Workforce Investment Board, she helped job-seekers develop workplace skills and find employment. Ortega serves on the Alameda County Vaccine Equity Task Force, where she has secured paid sick leave and hazard pay for essential public safety, health providers, and frontline workers. During the pandemic, she focused her work on testing and vaccination efforts to ensure the safety of frontline workers.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Ortega is a labor organizer and community activist, which she does to form coalitions and develop strategies necessary to build union power. She was elected delegate to the Alameda Democratic Central Committee in 2014, and, in the two years that she served in that role, facilitated meetings and discussions between Democrats and labor leaders on issues facing their members.

    Other background: Ortega is a lifelong resident of the East Bay and currently lives in San Leandro. She came to the United States at the age of three, and understands the unique challenges that immigrant families face in attaining the American dream.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Liz Ortega (D), 32%; Shawn Kumagai (D), 24%; Jennifer Esteen (D), 22%; and Joseph Grcar (R) 22%. Liz Ortega and Shawn Kumagai will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Ortega’s campaign has raised $611,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Shawn Kumagai

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Kumagai’s campaign has raised $432,000 and is funded by a significant number of real estate donors, including California Real Estate PAC, Western Manufactured Housing Communities Association PAC, Shea Homes, and Novin Development Corporation.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 20th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda County.

    Voter registration: 57% Democrat, 13% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-20 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 24% Latino, 32% Asian, and 10% Black

    Recent election results: AD-20 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 52 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 50 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Liz Ortega

    Courage California endorses Liz Ortega for State Assembly to put AD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Liz Ortega’s organizing background and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Ortega has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including California Teachers Association, Planned Parenthood, California Legislative Women’s Caucus, and many labor organizations. In addition, she has received the endorsement of many elected officials, including Attorney General Rob Bonta, Board of Equalization Member Malia Cohen, Assm. Alex Lee, and labor leader Dolores Huerta. She has also recently received the endorsement of her primary competitor, Jennifer Esteen.

    Electoral history: Ortega has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Job creation and economic growth, homelessness and housing, education, public safety, and environmental justice.

    Priority bills: Ortega has more than two decades of experience in labor leadership and working with progressive Democratic leaders and community organizations. As statewide political director for AFSCME Local 3299, the University of California’s largest employee union, Ortega ensured the passage of state legislation to preserve and protect essential service jobs at every UC campus. She is the first Latina elected as executive secretary–treasurer of the Alameda Labor Council, and in this role has fought for an equitable minimum wage to support working families. As a member of the Alameda County Workforce Investment Board, she helped job-seekers develop workplace skills and find employment. Ortega serves on the Alameda County Vaccine Equity Task Force, where she has secured paid sick leave and hazard pay for essential public safety, health providers, and frontline workers. During the pandemic, she focused her work on testing and vaccination efforts to ensure the safety of frontline workers.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Ortega is a labor organizer and community activist, which she does to form coalitions and develop strategies necessary to build union power. She was elected delegate to the Alameda Democratic Central Committee in 2014, and, in the two years that she served in that role, facilitated meetings and discussions between Democrats and labor leaders on issues facing their members.

    Other background: Ortega is a lifelong resident of the East Bay and currently lives in San Leandro. She came to the United States at the age of three, and understands the unique challenges that immigrant families face in attaining the American dream.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Liz Ortega (D), 32%; Shawn Kumagai (D), 24%; Jennifer Esteen (D), 22%; and Joseph Grcar (R) 22%. Liz Ortega and Shawn Kumagai will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Ortega’s campaign has raised $611,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Shawn Kumagai

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Kumagai’s campaign has raised $432,000 and is funded by a significant number of real estate donors, including California Real Estate PAC, Western Manufactured Housing Communities Association PAC, Shea Homes, and Novin Development Corporation.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 20th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda County.

    Voter registration: 57% Democrat, 13% Republican, and 25% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-20 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 24% Latino, 32% Asian, and 10% Black

    Recent election results: AD-20 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 52 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 50 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Jessica Self

    Courage California endorses Jessica Self for State Assembly to put AD-22 on the right track for progress.

    Self’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-22 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Self has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Labor Federation, and Planned Parenthood-Mar Monte.

    Electoral history: Self has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Jobs, education, health care, housing, and funding for the Central Valley region.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Self is a lawyer for the Stanislaus County Department of Child Support Services and was previously a public defender, which has given her extensive frontline experience with communities in the district. She has been a strong supporter of criminal-justice reform. Self is chair of the Stanislaus County Democratic Central Committee, an executive board member of the California Democratic Party, and vice president of Programs for the Stanislaus County Commission for Women.

    Self has also volunteered with several organizations, including the Humane Society, MoPride, Central Valley Democratic Club, and the Modesto Progressive Democratic Club. She founded the Blue Wave Project in Stanislaus County, which has elected 36 new candidates to local office since 2015.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Self (D), 26.9%; Juan Alanis (R), 36.6%; and Chad Condit (D) 20.3%. Self and Alanis will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Self’s campaign has raised $305,798.55 and is not funded by corporate PACs, police, fossil fuel, or real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Juan Alanis

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Alanis’s campaign has raised $370,815.93 and is funded by police, corporate PACs, fossil fuel, and real estate money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 22nd Assembly District includes parts of Merced and Stanislaus Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 33% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. This is a new competitive district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-22 is 6% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 36% Latino, 6% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-22 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 5 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 3 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Jessica Self

    Courage California endorses Jessica Self for State Assembly to put AD-22 on the right track for progress.

    Self’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-22 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Self has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Labor Federation, and Planned Parenthood-Mar Monte.

    Electoral history: Self has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Jobs, education, health care, housing, and funding for the Central Valley region.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Self is a lawyer for the Stanislaus County Department of Child Support Services and was previously a public defender, which has given her extensive frontline experience with communities in the district. She has been a strong supporter of criminal-justice reform. Self is chair of the Stanislaus County Democratic Central Committee, an executive board member of the California Democratic Party, and vice president of Programs for the Stanislaus County Commission for Women.

    Self has also volunteered with several organizations, including the Humane Society, MoPride, Central Valley Democratic Club, and the Modesto Progressive Democratic Club. She founded the Blue Wave Project in Stanislaus County, which has elected 36 new candidates to local office since 2015.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Self (D), 26.9%; Juan Alanis (R), 36.6%; and Chad Condit (D) 20.3%. Self and Alanis will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Self’s campaign has raised $305,798.55 and is not funded by corporate PACs, police, fossil fuel, or real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Juan Alanis

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Alanis’s campaign has raised $370,815.93 and is funded by police, corporate PACs, fossil fuel, and real estate money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 22nd Assembly District includes parts of Merced and Stanislaus Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 33% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. This is a new competitive district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-22 is 6% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 36% Latino, 6% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-22 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 5 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 3 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Jessica Self

    Courage California endorses Jessica Self for State Assembly to put AD-22 on the right track for progress.

    Self’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-22 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Self has the endorsement of some progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Labor Federation, and Planned Parenthood-Mar Monte.

    Electoral history: Self has not run for office previously.

    Top issues: Jobs, education, health care, housing, and funding for the Central Valley region.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Self is a lawyer for the Stanislaus County Department of Child Support Services and was previously a public defender, which has given her extensive frontline experience with communities in the district. She has been a strong supporter of criminal-justice reform. Self is chair of the Stanislaus County Democratic Central Committee, an executive board member of the California Democratic Party, and vice president of Programs for the Stanislaus County Commission for Women.

    Self has also volunteered with several organizations, including the Humane Society, MoPride, Central Valley Democratic Club, and the Modesto Progressive Democratic Club. She founded the Blue Wave Project in Stanislaus County, which has elected 36 new candidates to local office since 2015.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Self (D), 26.9%; Juan Alanis (R), 36.6%; and Chad Condit (D) 20.3%. Self and Alanis will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Self’s campaign has raised $305,798.55 and is not funded by corporate PACs, police, fossil fuel, or real estate money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Juan Alanis

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Alanis’s campaign has raised $370,815.93 and is funded by police, corporate PACs, fossil fuel, and real estate money.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 22nd Assembly District includes parts of Merced and Stanislaus Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 33% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. This is a new competitive district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-22 is 6% more Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 36% Latino, 6% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-22 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 5 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 3 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Alex Lee

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Lee for reelection to keep AD-24 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Lee’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-24 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Lee has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, such as Courage California, California Working Families Party, Sunrise Silicon Valley, South Bay Progressive Alliance, and East Bay for Everyone.
    He has also received the endorsement of a number of elected officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, State Assemblymember Ash Kalra, State Senator Scott Weiner, and the API and LGBTQ+ Legislative Caucuses.

    Top issues: Housing, economic justice, public safety, education, seniors, and corporate accountability.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Lee’s priorities for AD-24 have included 41 bills about criminal-justice reform, elections, and other areas. Of these, 16 have been chaptered into law. They were passed by the Senate and two were vetoed. Four were signed into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to limit light pollution and prevent the theft of service animals. He has supported extended paid sick leave for essential workers and probation reform for youth, among other things. He scores a 100 out of 100 and an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Lee has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Lee currently sits on five committees, including the Committee on Education and the Committee on Budget. He chairs the Select Committee on Social Housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Lee served in the AD-25 assembly seat since 2020, when he was elected with over 70% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Lee interned at the district office of former Congressman Mike Honda and several California legislators. He is a longtime champion of public safety, education, housing, and seniors.

    Other background: Assm. Lee is from San Jose. He became California’s youngest and the first openly bisexual legislator upon his election to this seat.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Alex Lee (D), 39%; Bob Brunton (R), 21%; and Kansen Chu (D), 18%. Lee and Brunton will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Lee’s campaign has raised $943,910 and is not funded by corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, or police money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Bob Brunton

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Brunton’s campaign has not filed any fundraising disclosures with the secretary of state’s office for this race.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 24th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties.

    Voter registration: 50% Democrat, 15% Republican, and 31% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-24 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 16% Latino, 54% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-24 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 40 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Alex Lee

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Lee for reelection to keep AD-24 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Lee’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-24 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Lee has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, such as Courage California, California Working Families Party, Sunrise Silicon Valley, South Bay Progressive Alliance, and East Bay for Everyone.
    He has also received the endorsement of a number of elected officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, State Assemblymember Ash Kalra, State Senator Scott Weiner, and the API and LGBTQ+ Legislative Caucuses.

    Top issues: Housing, economic justice, public safety, education, seniors, and corporate accountability.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Lee’s priorities for AD-24 have included 41 bills about criminal-justice reform, elections, and other areas. Of these, 16 have been chaptered into law. They were passed by the Senate and two were vetoed. Four were signed into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to limit light pollution and prevent the theft of service animals. He has supported extended paid sick leave for essential workers and probation reform for youth, among other things. He scores a 100 out of 100 and an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Lee has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Lee currently sits on five committees, including the Committee on Education and the Committee on Budget. He chairs the Select Committee on Social Housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Lee served in the AD-25 assembly seat since 2020, when he was elected with over 70% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Lee interned at the district office of former Congressman Mike Honda and several California legislators. He is a longtime champion of public safety, education, housing, and seniors.

    Other background: Assm. Lee is from San Jose. He became California’s youngest and the first openly bisexual legislator upon his election to this seat.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Alex Lee (D), 39%; Bob Brunton (R), 21%; and Kansen Chu (D), 18%. Lee and Brunton will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Lee’s campaign has raised $943,910 and is not funded by corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, or police money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Bob Brunton

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Brunton’s campaign has not filed any fundraising disclosures with the secretary of state’s office for this race.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 24th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties.

    Voter registration: 50% Democrat, 15% Republican, and 31% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-24 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 16% Latino, 54% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-24 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 40 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Alex Lee

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Lee for reelection to keep AD-24 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Lee’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that he will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-24 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. Lee has the endorsement of many progressive groups in the district, such as Courage California, California Working Families Party, Sunrise Silicon Valley, South Bay Progressive Alliance, and East Bay for Everyone.
    He has also received the endorsement of a number of elected officials across the state, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, State Assemblymember Ash Kalra, State Senator Scott Weiner, and the API and LGBTQ+ Legislative Caucuses.

    Top issues: Housing, economic justice, public safety, education, seniors, and corporate accountability.

    Priority bills: This year, Assm. Lee’s priorities for AD-24 have included 41 bills about criminal-justice reform, elections, and other areas. Of these, 16 have been chaptered into law. They were passed by the Senate and two were vetoed. Four were signed into law. He has sponsored and passed legislation to limit light pollution and prevent the theft of service animals. He has supported extended paid sick leave for essential workers and probation reform for youth, among other things. He scores a 100 out of 100 and an All-Star on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Lee has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. Lee currently sits on five committees, including the Committee on Education and the Committee on Budget. He chairs the Select Committee on Social Housing.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. Lee served in the AD-25 assembly seat since 2020, when he was elected with over 70% of the vote.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assm. Lee interned at the district office of former Congressman Mike Honda and several California legislators. He is a longtime champion of public safety, education, housing, and seniors.

    Other background: Assm. Lee is from San Jose. He became California’s youngest and the first openly bisexual legislator upon his election to this seat.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Alex Lee (D), 39%; Bob Brunton (R), 21%; and Kansen Chu (D), 18%. Lee and Brunton will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. Lee’s campaign has raised $943,910 and is not funded by corporate PACs, fossil fuel money, or police money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Bob Brunton

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Brunton’s campaign has not filed any fundraising disclosures with the secretary of state’s office for this race.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 24th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties.

    Voter registration: 50% Democrat, 15% Republican, and 31% No Party Preference. Democrats have held this district since 2012. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-24 is 1% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 16% Latino, 54% Asian, and 4% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-24 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 43 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 40 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Pilar Schiavo

    Courage California endorses Pilar Schiavo for State Assembly to put AD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Pilar Schiavo’s policy positions and organizing experience demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including AFSCME California, UNITE HERE!, California Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. She has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla, Board of Equalization member Malia Cohen, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Schiavo has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: Schiavo has long been involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the California Nurses Association (CNA), she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good-paying job. She also has extensive experience in organizations outside her district, including organizing for Healthy California Now and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. Schiavo co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Other background: Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares (R), 47%; Pilar Schiavo (D), 34%; and Annie Cho (D), 19%. Pilar Schiavo and Suzette Martinez Valladares will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Shiavo’s campaign has raised $754,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Martinez Valladares’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. Her problematic donors include Chevron Policy Government and Public Affairs, California Real Estate PAC, California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC, and AT&T Services Inc.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Republicans held this district until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 8% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Pilar Schiavo

    Courage California endorses Pilar Schiavo for State Assembly to put AD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Pilar Schiavo’s policy positions and organizing experience demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including AFSCME California, UNITE HERE!, California Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. She has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla, Board of Equalization member Malia Cohen, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Schiavo has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: Schiavo has long been involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the California Nurses Association (CNA), she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good-paying job. She also has extensive experience in organizations outside her district, including organizing for Healthy California Now and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. Schiavo co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Other background: Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares (R), 47%; Pilar Schiavo (D), 34%; and Annie Cho (D), 19%. Pilar Schiavo and Suzette Martinez Valladares will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Shiavo’s campaign has raised $754,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Martinez Valladares’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. Her problematic donors include Chevron Policy Government and Public Affairs, California Real Estate PAC, California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC, and AT&T Services Inc.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Republicans held this district until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 8% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Pilar Schiavo

    Courage California endorses Pilar Schiavo for State Assembly to put AD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Pilar Schiavo’s policy positions and organizing experience demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-40 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Schiavo has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including AFSCME California, UNITE HERE!, California Stonewall Democratic Club, Daybreak PAC, and Project Super Bloom. She has also received the endorsement of many elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Alex Padilla, Board of Equalization member Malia Cohen, State Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Electoral history: Schiavo has not run for public office before.

    Top issues: Economy and jobs creation, Health Care for All, homelessness and housing, mutual aid, women’s issues, and environmental protections.

    Priority bills: Schiavo has long been involved in labor-organizing work. She served as political director for the San Francisco Labor Council, which guaranteed health care in San Francisco. Schiavo also recruited and trained new organizers at the AFL-CIO Organizing Institute and represented mental-health workers for SEIU in Massachusetts, where she also did low-income tenant organizing. While with the California Nurses Association (CNA), she worked closely with nurses to organize a statewide coalition for a single-payer system in California, including coordinating the field campaign for SB 562. Her work with CNA also involved time as a field coordinator to deploy nurses for disasters and humanitarian missions to hurricane sites, border shelters, California wildfires, and a COVID-19 vaccine clinic in South Los Angeles. In her more recent organizing, Schiavo co-founded West Valley Homes YES! (WVHY) to fight for housing for unhoused neighbors. In 2020, the organization became the largest mutual-aid program in the San Fernando Valley.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Schiavo has worked in the labor movement for two decades and for the California Nurses Association (CNA) for almost 13 years, which she does to uplift working families and ensure that all people have access to housing, health care, and a good-paying job. She also has extensive experience in organizations outside her district, including organizing for Healthy California Now and Medicare for All in California. Moreover, she has worked with APEN and a broad coalition in the East Bay on environmental issues, and with Jobs with Justice SF, the Chinese Progressive Association, and various SEIU Local and unions in San Francisco while at the San Francisco Labor Council. Schiavo co-founded the West Valley People’s Alliance to advocate for racial justice, affordable housing, and environmental justice.

    Other background: Schiavo is from Southern California’s West Valley and currently lives in Chatsworth.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included incumbent Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares (R), 47%; Pilar Schiavo (D), 34%; and Annie Cho (D), 19%. Pilar Schiavo and Suzette Martinez Valladares will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Shiavo’s campaign has raised $754,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel, real estate, corporate PAC, or police donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Assm. Suzette Martinez Valladares

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Martinez Valladares’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, police, and fossil fuel interests. Her problematic donors include Chevron Policy Government and Public Affairs, California Real Estate PAC, California Association of Highway Patrolmen PAC, and AT&T Services Inc.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 40th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 42% Democrat, 29% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Republicans held this district until 2018 when James Ramos won and flipped it from red to blue. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-40 is 8% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 15% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-40 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 16 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 10 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Christy Holstege

    Courage California endorses Christy Holstege to put AD-47 on the right track for progress.

    Christy Holstege’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-47 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Holstege has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, California Labor Federation, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and California Environmental Justice Alliance Action. She has also received the endorsement of many public officials, including Rep. Ro Khanna, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Alex Lee. However, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Peace Officers Research Association of California.

    Electoral history: Holstege won a seat on the Palm Springs City Council in 2017 with 30% of the vote. In 2020, she won reelection to the council with 54% of the vote, and served a one-year term as mayor.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, pandemic recovery, environmental protections and clean energy, veterans services, and LGBTQIA+ equality.

    Priority policies: As mayor and a member of the Palm Springs City Council, Holstege has supported the establishment of a guaranteed-income program for transgender and nonbinary residents, broke ground on a new affordable housing project, and began a partial transition to residential wind energy.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Holstege is an attorney and established a legal aid clinic for domestic violence survivors at the Coachella Valley’s only domestic violence shelter. She has also represented farmworkers in civil rights, housing, and employment litigation at California Rural Legal Assistance. Holstege served on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest and Eastern Coachella Valley for Change. She also served on the Palm Springs Human Rights Commission and the City of Palm Springs Homelessness Task Force.

    Other background: Holstege lives in Palm Springs. She was the first openly bisexual person to serve a term as mayor in the United States.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Christy Holstege (D), 47%; Greg Wallis (R), 35%; Gary Michaels (R), 12%; and Jamie Swain (D), 7%. Christy Holstege and Greg Wallis will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Holstege’s campaign has raised $762,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel interests. She has received problematic donations from real estate, police, and corporate PAC interests, including Palm Springs Police Officers Association PAC, Leaskou Partners Incorporated, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Greg Wallis

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Wallis’s campaign has raised $273,000 and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Western Manufactured Housing Communities Association PAC, Sempra Energy, Riverside Sheriff’s Association Public Education Fund, and Marathon Petroleum Corporation.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 47th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 34% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-47 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 4% Asian, and 5% Black

    Recent election results: AD-47 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 7 points and John Cox for governor in 2018 by 1 point.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Christy Holstege

    Courage California endorses Christy Holstege to put AD-47 on the right track for progress.

    Christy Holstege’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-47 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Holstege has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, California Labor Federation, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and California Environmental Justice Alliance Action. She has also received the endorsement of many public officials, including Rep. Ro Khanna, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Alex Lee. However, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Peace Officers Research Association of California.

    Electoral history: Holstege won a seat on the Palm Springs City Council in 2017 with 30% of the vote. In 2020, she won reelection to the council with 54% of the vote, and served a one-year term as mayor.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, pandemic recovery, environmental protections and clean energy, veterans services, and LGBTQIA+ equality.

    Priority policies: As mayor and a member of the Palm Springs City Council, Holstege has supported the establishment of a guaranteed-income program for transgender and nonbinary residents, broke ground on a new affordable housing project, and began a partial transition to residential wind energy.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Holstege is an attorney and established a legal aid clinic for domestic violence survivors at the Coachella Valley’s only domestic violence shelter. She has also represented farmworkers in civil rights, housing, and employment litigation at California Rural Legal Assistance. Holstege served on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest and Eastern Coachella Valley for Change. She also served on the Palm Springs Human Rights Commission and the City of Palm Springs Homelessness Task Force.

    Other background: Holstege lives in Palm Springs. She was the first openly bisexual person to serve a term as mayor in the United States.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Christy Holstege (D), 47%; Greg Wallis (R), 35%; Gary Michaels (R), 12%; and Jamie Swain (D), 7%. Christy Holstege and Greg Wallis will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Holstege’s campaign has raised $762,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel interests. She has received problematic donations from real estate, police, and corporate PAC interests, including Palm Springs Police Officers Association PAC, Leaskou Partners Incorporated, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Greg Wallis

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Wallis’s campaign has raised $273,000 and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Western Manufactured Housing Communities Association PAC, Sempra Energy, Riverside Sheriff’s Association Public Education Fund, and Marathon Petroleum Corporation.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 47th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 34% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-47 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 4% Asian, and 5% Black

    Recent election results: AD-47 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 7 points and John Cox for governor in 2018 by 1 point.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Christy Holstege

    Courage California endorses Christy Holstege to put AD-47 on the right track for progress.

    Christy Holstege’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-47 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Holstege has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, California Labor Federation, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and California Environmental Justice Alliance Action. She has also received the endorsement of many public officials, including Rep. Ro Khanna, Attorney General Rob Bonta, Assm. Laura Friedman, and Assm. Alex Lee. However, she has also received endorsements from problematic stakeholders, including Peace Officers Research Association of California.

    Electoral history: Holstege won a seat on the Palm Springs City Council in 2017 with 30% of the vote. In 2020, she won reelection to the council with 54% of the vote, and served a one-year term as mayor.

    Top issues: Homelessness and housing, pandemic recovery, environmental protections and clean energy, veterans services, and LGBTQIA+ equality.

    Priority policies: As mayor and a member of the Palm Springs City Council, Holstege has supported the establishment of a guaranteed-income program for transgender and nonbinary residents, broke ground on a new affordable housing project, and began a partial transition to residential wind energy.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Holstege is an attorney and established a legal aid clinic for domestic violence survivors at the Coachella Valley’s only domestic violence shelter. She has also represented farmworkers in civil rights, housing, and employment litigation at California Rural Legal Assistance. Holstege served on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest and Eastern Coachella Valley for Change. She also served on the Palm Springs Human Rights Commission and the City of Palm Springs Homelessness Task Force.

    Other background: Holstege lives in Palm Springs. She was the first openly bisexual person to serve a term as mayor in the United States.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Christy Holstege (D), 47%; Greg Wallis (R), 35%; Gary Michaels (R), 12%; and Jamie Swain (D), 7%. Christy Holstege and Greg Wallis will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Holstege’s campaign has raised $762,000 and is not funded by fossil fuel interests. She has received problematic donations from real estate, police, and corporate PAC interests, including Palm Springs Police Officers Association PAC, Leaskou Partners Incorporated, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Greg Wallis

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Wallis’s campaign has raised $273,000 and is funded by corporate PAC, real estate, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Western Manufactured Housing Communities Association PAC, Sempra Energy, Riverside Sheriff’s Association Public Education Fund, and Marathon Petroleum Corporation.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 47th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

    Voter registration: 40% Democrat, 34% Republican, and 19% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-47 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 27% Latino, 4% Asian, and 5% Black

    Recent election results: AD-47 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 7 points and John Cox for governor in 2018 by 1 point.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Rick Chavez Zbur

    Courage California endorses Rick Chavez Zbur for State Assembly to put AD-51 on the right track for progress.

    Rick Chavez Zbur’s record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    Electoral history: Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin.

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: As a nonprofit and community leader, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of social-service access for underserved populations and economic revitalization. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. He also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Other background: Rick Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rick Chavez Zbur (D), 62%; and Louis Abramson (D), 38%. Rick Chavez Zbur and Louis Abramson will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is not funded by police interests. He has received problematic donations from Edison International, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Louis Abramson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Abramson’s campaign has raised $220,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 58% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Courage California endorses Rick Chavez Zbur for State Assembly to put AD-51 on the right track for progress.

    Rick Chavez Zbur’s record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    Electoral history: Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin.

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: As a nonprofit and community leader, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of social-service access for underserved populations and economic revitalization. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. He also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Other background: Rick Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rick Chavez Zbur (D), 62%; and Louis Abramson (D), 38%. Rick Chavez Zbur and Louis Abramson will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is not funded by police interests. He has received problematic donations from Edison International, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Louis Abramson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Abramson’s campaign has raised $220,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 58% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Rick Chavez Zbur

    Courage California endorses Rick Chavez Zbur for State Assembly to put AD-51 on the right track for progress.

    Rick Chavez Zbur’s record of coalition-building and equity-focused work demonstrates that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-51 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Chavez Zbur has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Heart of LA Democratic Club, California Legislative Progressive Caucus, California Labor Federation, California Environmental Voters, Stonewall Democratic Club, and Westside Young Democrats. He has also received the endorsement of state and local leaders, including L.A. Supervisor Holly Mitchell, Senator Alex Padilla, Congressmember Katie Porter, and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    Electoral history: Chavez Zbur ran for Congress in 1996, but lost the election to the Republican incumbent by a ten-point margin.

    Top issues: Economic reform, reproductive justice, workers’ rights, civil rights, gun safety, homelessness and housing, and climate protections.

    Priority bills: As a nonprofit and community leader, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of social-service access for underserved populations and economic revitalization. His work with Equality California dovetailed with the organization’s transition to civil rights advocacy, and he supported the passage of over 90 bills related to LGBTQIA+ justice during his time in leadership. Beyond civil rights issues, Chavez Zbur has been a strong supporter of workers’ rights and economic reform, and views this as a gateway to more equitable access to housing, health care, education, and public services. His platform supports further increases to minimum wage, collective bargaining, and supported overtime, and lays out an ambitious vision of establishing a youth corps to connect homeless individuals with wraparound resources. He has also served as president and chair of California Environmental Voters, and would be a strong supporter of statewide efforts to curb the use of fossil fuels, subsidies to transition away from natural gas, and the governor’s goal of reducing gas-powered vehicles.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Chavez Zbur is an attorney and a nonprofit executive, working in private practice for 25 years before transitioning to serve as executive director of Equality California. He has cited his sister’s battle with ALS and his own experience as a member of the LGBTQIA+ community during the AIDS crisis as inspiring his transition to this work. AD-51 has the highest concentration of LGBTQIA+ individuals in Southern California, and Chavez Zbur’s network and understanding of the issues facing this community would benefit him as a legislative leader. He also currently serves on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and has taken a coalition approach to effect change in his leadership roles across his organizational work.

    Other background: Rick Chavez Zbur is from New Mexico and has lived in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years. Chavez Zbur has a long history of progressive community engagement, including serving on the boards of Lambda Legal Defense and Children Affected by AIDS Foundation, and working to elect former President Bill Clinton and former Senator Barbara Boxer.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Rick Chavez Zbur (D), 62%; and Louis Abramson (D), 38%. Rick Chavez Zbur and Louis Abramson will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Chavez Zbur’s campaign has raised $1.2 million and is not funded by police interests. He has received problematic donations from Edison International, California Real Estate PAC, and AT&T.

    Opposing candidate: Democrat Louis Abramson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Abramson’s campaign has raised $220,000 and is funded almost entirely by individual donors.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 58% Democrat, 12% Republican, and 23% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-51 is 5% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 14% Latino, 13% Asian, and 6% Black

    Recent election results: AD-51 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 58 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 64 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Corey Jackson

    Courage California endorses Corey Jackson for State Assembly to put AD-60 on the right track for progress.

    Corey Jackson’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-60 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Jackson has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Equality California, Inland Empire United, California Working Families Party, Voice for Progress, and the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and labor unions, like California Nurses Association, United Domestic Workers, SEIU. He is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, and Riverside County Supervisors Chuck Washington and Jeff Hewitt.

    Electoral history: Jackson has run for office previously, and won his race for the Riverside Board of Education by 31 points.

    Top issues: Jackson’s platform centers education and youth advocacy measures, like universal childcare, trauma-informed practices in school, and education reform. He also supports an affordable housing guarantee and campaign-finance reform.

    Governance and community leadership Experience: Jackson serves on the Riverside County School Board, advocating to increase mental-health services in schools and to eliminate the criminalization of children. He also founded the nonprofit SBX Youth and Family Services, which aims to disrupt the cycle of poverty through mentorship, education, and community organizing. He also holds leadership positions in the Riverside NAACP.

    Other background: Corey A. Jackson is from Rialto, CA, and has lived in Riverside County for more than ten years. He earned his bachelor’s at CSU San Bernardino and his master’s of social work from California Baptist University.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Corey A. Jackson (D), 27%; Hector Diaz Nava (R), 39.9%; Esther Portillo (D), 19.9%; and Jasmin Rubio (D), 13.2%. Corey Jackson and Hector Diaz-Nava will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Jackson’s campaign has raised $292,970 and is not funded by police unions, although he has accepted donations from the real estate industry, the fossil fuel industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Hector Diaz Nava

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nava’s campaign has raised $31,000 and has not committed to refusing donations from the police or the fossil fuel industry. His campaign is also principally self-funded.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 60th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 48% Democrat, 23% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-60 is largely unchanged, and maintains a Democratic registration advantage of 25%.

    District demographics: 51% Latino, 5% Asian, and 15% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-60 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 19 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Corey Jackson

    Courage California endorses Corey Jackson for State Assembly to put AD-60 on the right track for progress.

    Corey Jackson’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-60 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Jackson has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Equality California, Inland Empire United, California Working Families Party, Voice for Progress, and the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and labor unions, like California Nurses Association, United Domestic Workers, SEIU. He is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, and Riverside County Supervisors Chuck Washington and Jeff Hewitt.

    Electoral history: Jackson has run for office previously, and won his race for the Riverside Board of Education by 31 points.

    Top issues: Jackson’s platform centers education and youth advocacy measures, like universal childcare, trauma-informed practices in school, and education reform. He also supports an affordable housing guarantee and campaign-finance reform.

    Governance and community leadership Experience: Jackson serves on the Riverside County School Board, advocating to increase mental-health services in schools and to eliminate the criminalization of children. He also founded the nonprofit SBX Youth and Family Services, which aims to disrupt the cycle of poverty through mentorship, education, and community organizing. He also holds leadership positions in the Riverside NAACP.

    Other background: Corey A. Jackson is from Rialto, CA, and has lived in Riverside County for more than ten years. He earned his bachelor’s at CSU San Bernardino and his master’s of social work from California Baptist University.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Corey A. Jackson (D), 27%; Hector Diaz Nava (R), 39.9%; Esther Portillo (D), 19.9%; and Jasmin Rubio (D), 13.2%. Corey Jackson and Hector Diaz-Nava will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Jackson’s campaign has raised $292,970 and is not funded by police unions, although he has accepted donations from the real estate industry, the fossil fuel industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Hector Diaz Nava

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nava’s campaign has raised $31,000 and has not committed to refusing donations from the police or the fossil fuel industry. His campaign is also principally self-funded.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 60th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 48% Democrat, 23% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-60 is largely unchanged, and maintains a Democratic registration advantage of 25%.

    District demographics: 51% Latino, 5% Asian, and 15% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-60 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 19 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Corey Jackson

    Courage California endorses Corey Jackson for State Assembly to put AD-60 on the right track for progress.

    Corey Jackson’s policy positions demonstrate that he will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-60 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Jackson has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Planned Parenthood, Equality California, Inland Empire United, California Working Families Party, Voice for Progress, and the California Legislative Progressive Caucus, and labor unions, like California Nurses Association, United Domestic Workers, SEIU. He is also endorsed by a broad set of federal, state, and local elected officials, including U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, and Riverside County Supervisors Chuck Washington and Jeff Hewitt.

    Electoral history: Jackson has run for office previously, and won his race for the Riverside Board of Education by 31 points.

    Top issues: Jackson’s platform centers education and youth advocacy measures, like universal childcare, trauma-informed practices in school, and education reform. He also supports an affordable housing guarantee and campaign-finance reform.

    Governance and community leadership Experience: Jackson serves on the Riverside County School Board, advocating to increase mental-health services in schools and to eliminate the criminalization of children. He also founded the nonprofit SBX Youth and Family Services, which aims to disrupt the cycle of poverty through mentorship, education, and community organizing. He also holds leadership positions in the Riverside NAACP.

    Other background: Corey A. Jackson is from Rialto, CA, and has lived in Riverside County for more than ten years. He earned his bachelor’s at CSU San Bernardino and his master’s of social work from California Baptist University.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Corey A. Jackson (D), 27%; Hector Diaz Nava (R), 39.9%; Esther Portillo (D), 19.9%; and Jasmin Rubio (D), 13.2%. Corey Jackson and Hector Diaz-Nava will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Jackson’s campaign has raised $292,970 and is not funded by police unions, although he has accepted donations from the real estate industry, the fossil fuel industry, and corporate PACs.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Hector Diaz Nava

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Nava’s campaign has raised $31,000 and has not committed to refusing donations from the police or the fossil fuel industry. His campaign is also principally self-funded.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 60th Assembly District includes parts of Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 48% Democrat, 23% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. After the 2021 redistricting process, AD-60 is largely unchanged, and maintains a Democratic registration advantage of 25%.

    District demographics: 51% Latino, 5% Asian, and 15% Black. This district is considered to be one of the strong Latino seats in the California Assembly delegation.

    Recent election results: AD-60 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 26 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 19 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Tina McKinnor

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Tina McKinnor for reelection to keep CD-61 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Tina McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including ACCE Action, Black Women for Wellness Action Project, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Working Families Party. She has also received the endorsement of many officials, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, labor leader Dolores Huerta, Treasurer Fiona Ma, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: Assm. McKinnor joined the Assembly after a special election victory in June 2022, and has had limited time to present her priorities through legislation. So far, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for her current district, AD-62, have included one amended bill about housing and zoning code. Before running for office, she also served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. Assm. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. She has not yet been included in Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Environmental Safety & Toxic Materials, Public Employment & Retirement, and Rules.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Other background: Tina McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Robert Pullen-Miles (D), 39%; Assm. Tina McKinnor (D), 33%; James Arlandus Spencer (R), 14%; Angie Reyes English (D), 11%; and Nico Ruderman (D), 4%. Assm. Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $231,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Robert Pullen-Miles
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $91,000 and is funded by real estate, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Inglewood Police Association PAC, Chevron Policy Government & Public Affairs, and California Real Estate PAC.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 9% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-61 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 69 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Tina McKinnor

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Tina McKinnor for reelection to keep CD-61 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Tina McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including ACCE Action, Black Women for Wellness Action Project, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Working Families Party. She has also received the endorsement of many officials, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, labor leader Dolores Huerta, Treasurer Fiona Ma, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: Assm. McKinnor joined the Assembly after a special election victory in June 2022, and has had limited time to present her priorities through legislation. So far, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for her current district, AD-62, have included one amended bill about housing and zoning code. Before running for office, she also served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. Assm. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. She has not yet been included in Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Environmental Safety & Toxic Materials, Public Employment & Retirement, and Rules.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Other background: Tina McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Robert Pullen-Miles (D), 39%; Assm. Tina McKinnor (D), 33%; James Arlandus Spencer (R), 14%; Angie Reyes English (D), 11%; and Nico Ruderman (D), 4%. Assm. Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $231,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Robert Pullen-Miles
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $91,000 and is funded by real estate, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Inglewood Police Association PAC, Chevron Policy Government & Public Affairs, and California Real Estate PAC.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 9% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-61 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 69 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Tina McKinnor

    Courage California endorses Assemblymember Tina McKinnor for reelection to keep CD-61 on the right track for progress.

    Assm. Tina McKinnor’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will continue to be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-61 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Assm. McKinnor has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including ACCE Action, Black Women for Wellness Action Project, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and Working Families Party. She has also received the endorsement of many officials, including California Legislative Progressive Caucus, labor leader Dolores Huerta, Treasurer Fiona Ma, Senator Maria Elena Durazo, and Assm. Isaac Bryan.

    Top issues: Housing, criminal-justice reform, climate protections, health care, and equity in the cannabis industry.

    Priority bills: Assm. McKinnor joined the Assembly after a special election victory in June 2022, and has had limited time to present her priorities through legislation. So far, Assm. McKinnor’s priorities for her current district, AD-62, have included one amended bill about housing and zoning code. Before running for office, she also served as a district director and chief of staff in the State Assembly, where she guided significant legislation, including a bill that ensured that minority, women-owned, and LGBTQIA+ businesses would be given equal consideration as state contractors. Assm. McKinnor led LA Voice’s work in successfully advocating for the passing and implementation of SB 2 to increase police accountability. She also led LA Voice Action’s electoral campaigns to help elect Los Angeles Supervisor Holly Mitchell and District Attorney George Gascón. She has not yet been included in Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record.

    Committee leadership/membership: Assm. McKinnor currently sits on four committees, including Business & Professions, Environmental Safety & Toxic Materials, Public Employment & Retirement, and Rules.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Assm. McKinnor has served in this assembly seat since 2022, when she was elected with over 53% of the vote in a special election to replace AD-62 Assm. Autumn Burke after her mid-term retirement.

    Prior to joining the Assembly, Assm. McKinnor was the civic-engagement director for LA Voice and LA Voice Action, an interfaith organization that works with 59 connected congregations in Los Angeles County to bring progressive change to criminal justice, immigration, election reform, and housing reform. She does this work to find diverse and comprehensive solutions to community issues through local collaboration. McKinnor founded and runs the McKinnor Group, a consulting firm that offers a full spectrum of campaign services to elected officials, candidates, ballot-measure efforts, corporations, nonprofits, lobbyists, and other political groups. She has served as a board member with Partnership for Growth LA, and was the operational director for the California Democratic Party. McKinnor is a collaborative leader, and often seeks input and guidance from individuals and groups that have been directly affected by an issue. She has built a strong network in both the legislative and organizing communities, and has leveraged her deep knowledge of fiscal and people management to create meaningful change.

    Other background: Tina McKinnor has lived in Los Angeles for 28 years.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Robert Pullen-Miles (D), 39%; Assm. Tina McKinnor (D), 33%; James Arlandus Spencer (R), 14%; Angie Reyes English (D), 11%; and Nico Ruderman (D), 4%. Assm. Tina McKinnor and Robert Pullen-Miles will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Assm. McKinnor’s campaign has raised $231,000 and is not funded by police, fossil fuel, real estate, or corporate PAC donors.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Robert Pullen-Miles
    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Pullen-Miles’s campaign has raised $91,000 and is funded by real estate, corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police interests. His problematic donors include Inglewood Police Association PAC, Chevron Policy Government & Public Affairs, and California Real Estate PAC.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 61st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 63% Democrat, 9% Republican, and 21% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this seat. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-61 is 3% more Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 34% Latino, 6% Asian, and 34% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-61 voted for Joe Biden for president in 2020 by 68 points and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by 69 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Fauzia Rizvi

    Courage California endorses Fauzia Rizvi for State Assembly to push AD-63 in the right direction.

    Fauzia Rizvi’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-63 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Rizvi has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Environmental Justice Alliance Action, Inland Empire United, and United Domestic Workers. She is also endorsed by many federal and state elected officials, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Rep. Mark Takano, and Assm. Eloise Gómez Reyes. Rizvi also has the support of local mayors, city councilmembers, school board trustees, and commissioners.

    Electoral history: Rizvi has run for office previously, and won her race for the Western Municipal Water District Division 5 against her closest opponent by 19 points.

    Top issues: Housing, infrastructure, veterans, education, small business, and access to clean water.

    Priority policies: As a member of the Western Municipal Water District Division 5, she has ensured a balanced budget that provides high-quality services and a safe and reliable water supply to the public. Rizvi is pledging to bring more resources to the district for education, housing, and environmental and climate resilience when elected to the Assembly.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Rizvi is a Water Board member, a role she works in because of her passion for water and environmental protection. She helped ensure that her district was one of the first water districts to ensure water access continued during the pandemic and has been a longtime supporter of ensuring safe infrastructure and clean water.

    Other background: Rizvi, an engineer and business owner, is a longtime resident of Corona. She helped cofound the nonprofit For the People Task Force (FTPT). FTPT has been instrumental in providing essential workers with over 20,000 homemade hand-sewn masks and also established a food bank and pantry in Corona.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Fauzia Rizvi (D), 40%; Bill Essayli (R), 34%; and Clint Lorimore (R), 26%. Rizvi and Essayli will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rizvi’s campaign has raised $156,000 and is not funded by police, corporate, real estate, or police money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Bill Essayli

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Essayli’s campaign has raised $243,000 and is funded by police and corporate money. While Essayli claims residency in this district, he voted in Orange County, which is outside AD63, for the primary election. There are questions regarding whether he will be able to serve in the Assembly if he is not a resident of the district.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 63 Assembly District is entirely within Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 34% Democrat, 38% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-63 is 3% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 31% Latino, 11% Asian, and 7% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-63 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 11 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 16 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Fauzia Rizvi

    Courage California endorses Fauzia Rizvi for State Assembly to push AD-63 in the right direction.

    Fauzia Rizvi’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-63 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Rizvi has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Environmental Justice Alliance Action, Inland Empire United, and United Domestic Workers. She is also endorsed by many federal and state elected officials, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Rep. Mark Takano, and Assm. Eloise Gómez Reyes. Rizvi also has the support of local mayors, city councilmembers, school board trustees, and commissioners.

    Electoral history: Rizvi has run for office previously, and won her race for the Western Municipal Water District Division 5 against her closest opponent by 19 points.

    Top issues: Housing, infrastructure, veterans, education, small business, and access to clean water.

    Priority policies: As a member of the Western Municipal Water District Division 5, she has ensured a balanced budget that provides high-quality services and a safe and reliable water supply to the public. Rizvi is pledging to bring more resources to the district for education, housing, and environmental and climate resilience when elected to the Assembly.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Rizvi is a Water Board member, a role she works in because of her passion for water and environmental protection. She helped ensure that her district was one of the first water districts to ensure water access continued during the pandemic and has been a longtime supporter of ensuring safe infrastructure and clean water.

    Other background: Rizvi, an engineer and business owner, is a longtime resident of Corona. She helped cofound the nonprofit For the People Task Force (FTPT). FTPT has been instrumental in providing essential workers with over 20,000 homemade hand-sewn masks and also established a food bank and pantry in Corona.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Fauzia Rizvi (D), 40%; Bill Essayli (R), 34%; and Clint Lorimore (R), 26%. Rizvi and Essayli will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rizvi’s campaign has raised $156,000 and is not funded by police, corporate, real estate, or police money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Bill Essayli

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Essayli’s campaign has raised $243,000 and is funded by police and corporate money. While Essayli claims residency in this district, he voted in Orange County, which is outside AD63, for the primary election. There are questions regarding whether he will be able to serve in the Assembly if he is not a resident of the district.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 63 Assembly District is entirely within Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 34% Democrat, 38% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-63 is 3% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 31% Latino, 11% Asian, and 7% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-63 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 11 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 16 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Fauzia Rizvi

    Courage California endorses Fauzia Rizvi for State Assembly to push AD-63 in the right direction.

    Fauzia Rizvi’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of AD-63 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Rizvi has the endorsement of many progressive groups, including Courage California, Equality California, California Environmental Justice Alliance Action, Inland Empire United, and United Domestic Workers. She is also endorsed by many federal and state elected officials, including Governor Gavin Newsom, Rep. Mark Takano, and Assm. Eloise Gómez Reyes. Rizvi also has the support of local mayors, city councilmembers, school board trustees, and commissioners.

    Electoral history: Rizvi has run for office previously, and won her race for the Western Municipal Water District Division 5 against her closest opponent by 19 points.

    Top issues: Housing, infrastructure, veterans, education, small business, and access to clean water.

    Priority policies: As a member of the Western Municipal Water District Division 5, she has ensured a balanced budget that provides high-quality services and a safe and reliable water supply to the public. Rizvi is pledging to bring more resources to the district for education, housing, and environmental and climate resilience when elected to the Assembly.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Rizvi is a Water Board member, a role she works in because of her passion for water and environmental protection. She helped ensure that her district was one of the first water districts to ensure water access continued during the pandemic and has been a longtime supporter of ensuring safe infrastructure and clean water.

    Other background: Rizvi, an engineer and business owner, is a longtime resident of Corona. She helped cofound the nonprofit For the People Task Force (FTPT). FTPT has been instrumental in providing essential workers with over 20,000 homemade hand-sewn masks and also established a food bank and pantry in Corona.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Fauzia Rizvi (D), 40%; Bill Essayli (R), 34%; and Clint Lorimore (R), 26%. Rizvi and Essayli will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Rizvi’s campaign has raised $156,000 and is not funded by police, corporate, real estate, or police money.

    Opposing candidate: Republican Bill Essayli

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Essayli’s campaign has raised $243,000 and is funded by police and corporate money. While Essayli claims residency in this district, he voted in Orange County, which is outside AD63, for the primary election. There are questions regarding whether he will be able to serve in the Assembly if he is not a resident of the district.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 63 Assembly District is entirely within Riverside County.

    Voter registration: 34% Democrat, 38% Republican, and 20% No Party Preference. Republicans have held this district since 1992. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-63 is 3% less Republican than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 31% Latino, 11% Asian, and 7% Black.

    Recent election results: AD-63 voted for Trump for president in 2020 by 11 points and Cox for governor in 2018 by 16 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Fatima Iqbal-Zubair

    Courage California endorses Fatima Iqbal-Zubair for State Assembly to push AD-65 in the right direction.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-65 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Iqbal-Zubair has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Courage California, California Working Families Party, Communities for a Better Environment Action, California Progressive Alliance, Democratic Socialists of America-Los Angeles, Daybreak PAC, Health Care for All LA, and Project Super Bloom PAC. She is also endorsed by California Democratic Party Progressive Caucus Chair Amar Shergill and LA City Council member Mike Bonin.

    Electoral history: Iqbal-Zubair ran for State Assembly in AD-64 in 2020 and lost to Democratic incumbent Assm. Mike Gipson by 19 points.

    Top issues: equitable education, clean air and water, affordable housing, and universal health care for all.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Iqbal-Zubair is a chemistry and environmental sciences teacher in Watts, a role in which she cultivates a strong relationship with her students and builds community. She founded an award-winning FIRST Robotics team and served as director of the Department of Science. Iqbal-Zubair became an advocate for the environment when she and her students studied air pollution from local refineries, water pollution from contaminated pipes, and soil contamination in gardens, play areas, and their own football field. She is active in local organizations, such as the Watts Rising Leadership Council. After performing well in the 2020 elections, she was appointed to the executive board of the California Democratic Party.

    Iqbal-Zubair is running for election because she sees the struggles faced by her students and the district and because she believes in a government that works for all, not just a select few.

    Other background: Iqbal-Zubair immigrated from Dubai.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Mike Gipson (D), 71%; and Fatima Iqbal-Zubair (D), 27%, and Lydia Gutierrez (R), a write-in candidate, 2%. Assm. Mike Gipson and Fatima Iqbal-Zubair will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Iqbal-Zubair’s campaign has raised over $469,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC or fossil fuel money. Her campaign funding consists almost entirely of individual contributions.

    Opposing candidate: Democratic incumbent Assm. Mike Gipson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gipson’s campaign has raised over $1.4 million and is funded by police groups, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel money. Assm. Gipson scores a lifetime score of 73 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gipson has failed to support bills on tenant protections, single-use plastic bans, oil-drilling setbacks from schools and other sensitive areas, and worker protections.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 61% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-65 is 3% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black

    Recent election results: The most recent election results show that AD-65 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 61 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 63 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair

    Courage California endorses Fatima Iqbal-Zubair for State Assembly to push AD-65 in the right direction.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-65 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Iqbal-Zubair has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Courage California, California Working Families Party, Communities for a Better Environment Action, California Progressive Alliance, Democratic Socialists of America-Los Angeles, Daybreak PAC, Health Care for All LA, and Project Super Bloom PAC. She is also endorsed by California Democratic Party Progressive Caucus Chair Amar Shergill and LA City Council member Mike Bonin.

    Electoral history: Iqbal-Zubair ran for State Assembly in AD-64 in 2020 and lost to Democratic incumbent Assm. Mike Gipson by 19 points.

    Top issues: equitable education, clean air and water, affordable housing, and universal health care for all.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Iqbal-Zubair is a chemistry and environmental sciences teacher in Watts, a role in which she cultivates a strong relationship with her students and builds community. She founded an award-winning FIRST Robotics team and served as director of the Department of Science. Iqbal-Zubair became an advocate for the environment when she and her students studied air pollution from local refineries, water pollution from contaminated pipes, and soil contamination in gardens, play areas, and their own football field. She is active in local organizations, such as the Watts Rising Leadership Council. After performing well in the 2020 elections, she was appointed to the executive board of the California Democratic Party.

    Iqbal-Zubair is running for election because she sees the struggles faced by her students and the district and because she believes in a government that works for all, not just a select few.

    Other background: Iqbal-Zubair immigrated from Dubai.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Mike Gipson (D), 71%; and Fatima Iqbal-Zubair (D), 27%, and Lydia Gutierrez (R), a write-in candidate, 2%. Assm. Mike Gipson and Fatima Iqbal-Zubair will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Iqbal-Zubair’s campaign has raised over $469,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC or fossil fuel money. Her campaign funding consists almost entirely of individual contributions.

    Opposing candidate: Democratic incumbent Assm. Mike Gipson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gipson’s campaign has raised over $1.4 million and is funded by police groups, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel money. Assm. Gipson scores a lifetime score of 73 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gipson has failed to support bills on tenant protections, single-use plastic bans, oil-drilling setbacks from schools and other sensitive areas, and worker protections.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 61% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-65 is 3% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black

    Recent election results: The most recent election results show that AD-65 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 61 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 63 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair

    Courage California endorses Fatima Iqbal-Zubair for State Assembly to push AD-65 in the right direction.

    Fatima Iqbal-Zubair’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive champion for the constituents of AD-65 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Progressive endorsements: Iqbal-Zubair has the endorsement of a strong majority of progressive groups, including Courage California, California Working Families Party, Communities for a Better Environment Action, California Progressive Alliance, Democratic Socialists of America-Los Angeles, Daybreak PAC, Health Care for All LA, and Project Super Bloom PAC. She is also endorsed by California Democratic Party Progressive Caucus Chair Amar Shergill and LA City Council member Mike Bonin.

    Electoral history: Iqbal-Zubair ran for State Assembly in AD-64 in 2020 and lost to Democratic incumbent Assm. Mike Gipson by 19 points.

    Top issues: equitable education, clean air and water, affordable housing, and universal health care for all.

    Governance and community leadership experience: Iqbal-Zubair is a chemistry and environmental sciences teacher in Watts, a role in which she cultivates a strong relationship with her students and builds community. She founded an award-winning FIRST Robotics team and served as director of the Department of Science. Iqbal-Zubair became an advocate for the environment when she and her students studied air pollution from local refineries, water pollution from contaminated pipes, and soil contamination in gardens, play areas, and their own football field. She is active in local organizations, such as the Watts Rising Leadership Council. After performing well in the 2020 elections, she was appointed to the executive board of the California Democratic Party.

    Iqbal-Zubair is running for election because she sees the struggles faced by her students and the district and because she believes in a government that works for all, not just a select few.

    Other background: Iqbal-Zubair immigrated from Dubai.
     

    The Race

    Primary election results: The June 2022 results included Assm. Mike Gipson (D), 71%; and Fatima Iqbal-Zubair (D), 27%, and Lydia Gutierrez (R), a write-in candidate, 2%. Assm. Mike Gipson and Fatima Iqbal-Zubair will compete in a run-off in the November 8 general election.

    Candidate fundraising and pledges: Iqbal-Zubair’s campaign has raised over $469,000 and is not funded by police, real estate, corporate PAC or fossil fuel money. Her campaign funding consists almost entirely of individual contributions.

    Opposing candidate: Democratic incumbent Assm. Mike Gipson

    Opposing candidate’s fundraising and pledges: Assm. Gipson’s campaign has raised over $1.4 million and is funded by police groups, real estate, corporate PAC, and fossil fuel money. Assm. Gipson scores a lifetime score of 73 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assm. Gipson has failed to support bills on tenant protections, single-use plastic bans, oil-drilling setbacks from schools and other sensitive areas, and worker protections.
     

    The District

    Counties in district: California’s 65th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County.

    Voter registration: 61% Democrat, 11% Republican, and 22% No Party Preference. Democrats typically hold this district. Since the 2021 redistricting process, AD-65 is 3% less Democratic than it was during the 2020 general election cycle.

    District demographics: 49% Latino, 9% Asian, and 29% Black

    Recent election results: The most recent election results show that AD-65 voted for Biden for president in 2020 by 61 points and Newsom for governor in 2018 by 63 points.
     

    The Position

    State assemblymembers represent and advocate for the needs of their district constituents at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating, debating, and voting on legislation that addresses issues within their district.

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a three-quarters supermajority of 60 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 19 seats and one seat is held by an Independent.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California

State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

  • Dave Jones

    Courage California endorses Dave Jones for State Senate to put SD-08 on the right track for progress.

    Dave Jones

    Courage California endorses Dave Jones for State Senate to put SD-08 on the right track for progress.

    Dave Jones

    Courage California endorses Dave Jones for State Senate to put SD-08 on the right track for progress.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Aisha Wahab

    Courage California endorses Aisha Wahab for state Senate to put SD-10 on the right track for progress.

    Aisha Wahab

    Courage California endorses Aisha Wahab for state Senate to put SD-10 on the right track for progress.

    Aisha Wahab

    Courage California endorses Aisha Wahab for state Senate to put SD-10 on the right track for progress.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Caroline Menjivar

    Elect Caroline Menjivar to put SD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Caroline Menjivar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of SD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Caroline Menjivar

    Elect Caroline Menjivar to put SD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Caroline Menjivar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of SD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

    Caroline Menjivar

    Elect Caroline Menjivar to put SD-20 on the right track for progress.

    Caroline Menjivar’s track record and policy positions demonstrate that she will be a progressive voice for the constituents of SD-20 and will govern effectively in the best interest of this diverse district.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • Joseph Rocha

    Courage CA endorses Joseph Rocha for State Senate to put SD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Joseph Rocha

    Courage CA endorses Joseph Rocha for State Senate to put SD-40 on the right track for progress.

    Joseph Rocha

    Courage CA endorses Joseph Rocha for State Senate to put SD-40 on the right track for progress.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California

Depending on where you live, you may have the below county races on your ballot.

Have questions about voting in Alameda County? Read our guide to voting in Alameda County.

  • Pamela Price

    Courage California endorses Pamela Price for district attorney to put Alameda County on the right track for progress.

    Pamela Price

    Courage California endorses Pamela Price for district attorney to put Alameda County on the right track for progress.

    Pamela Price

    Courage California endorses Pamela Price for district attorney to put Alameda County on the right track for progress.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES on Prop 1

  • Vote YES on Proposition 1 to enshrine abortion rights into the California State Constitution.


    After the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in June 2022, the California State Legislature moved quickly to place Proposition 1 on the ballot. Although there is a right to privacy in the California State Constitution that has been historically interpreted to cover the right to choose to have an abortion, that right is not explicitly written into the State Constitution. Proposition 1 would amend the State Constitution to enshrine the right to reproductive freedom, including the right to choose to have an abortion and the right to choose or refuse contraception.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 1 matters:

    The California state legislature and governorship are currently controlled by Democrats. However, should that change, the reproductive freedom protections currently in place may be threatened. Enshrining the rights to abortion and contraceptives is a critical step Californians can take now to ensure that reproductive freedom remains a right in California, regardless of which party is in power. In order to remove such a protection from the State Constitution, Republicans would need to place another measure on the ballot, whether through the legislature or by citizen referendum, and convince California voters to vote for it.
    The Supremacy Clause of the federal Constitution usually gives federal law precedence over state statutes and constitutions. Although Prop. 1 would probably not be enough to stop a national ban, the courts would first have to strike down the constitutional language.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 1:

    Yes on Prop 1: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 1 are Planned Parenthood Advocacy Project Los Angeles County, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California, and M. Quinn Delaney, a wealthy liberal philanthropist and co-founder of the Akonadi Foundation. As of August 1, the Yes on Prop 1 committee has raised $355,112 and spent $79,000 since Jan. 1, 2022. The California Democratic Party has also endorsed Proposition 1.

    No on Prop 1: The recently formed No on Proposition 1 committee has raised $134,798 since August 1, and data has yet to be made available on how the committee has spent its funds. In addition, the California Republican Party came out in opposition to the ballot measure. The California Catholic Conference has also come out in opposition to Proposition 1, with the Archbishop of San Francisco stating that “the California bishops have made defeating Prop. 1 our number one priority for this year.”
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 1 includes:

    The California Catholic Conference claims that Prop. 1 would “over-ride current law” to allow for “taxpayer-funded” abortion care. Prop. 1 simply makes explicit the current, common interpretation of the California State Constitution that already allows for abortion care and state assistance for those seeking to receive such health care. Also, because these rights already exist in California, the proposition would have no direct fiscal effect, meaning it would not create increased costs to taxpayers.

    Vote YES on Proposition 1 to enshrine abortion rights into the California State Constitution.


    After the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in June 2022, the California State Legislature moved quickly to place Proposition 1 on the ballot. Although there is a right to privacy in the California State Constitution that has been historically interpreted to cover the right to choose to have an abortion, that right is not explicitly written into the State Constitution. Proposition 1 would amend the State Constitution to enshrine the right to reproductive freedom, including the right to choose to have an abortion and the right to choose or refuse contraception.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 1 matters:

    The California state legislature and governorship are currently controlled by Democrats. However, should that change, the reproductive freedom protections currently in place may be threatened. Enshrining the rights to abortion and contraceptives is a critical step Californians can take now to ensure that reproductive freedom remains a right in California, regardless of which party is in power. In order to remove such a protection from the State Constitution, Republicans would need to place another measure on the ballot, whether through the legislature or by citizen referendum, and convince California voters to vote for it.
    The Supremacy Clause of the federal Constitution usually gives federal law precedence over state statutes and constitutions. Although Prop. 1 would probably not be enough to stop a national ban, the courts would first have to strike down the constitutional language.
     

    Top funders of Proposition 1:

    Yes on Prop 1: The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 1 are Planned Parenthood Advocacy Project Los Angeles County, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California, and M. Quinn Delaney, a wealthy liberal philanthropist and co-founder of the Akonadi Foundation. As of August 1, the Yes on Prop 1 committee has raised $355,112 and spent $79,000 since Jan. 1, 2022. The California Democratic Party has also endorsed Proposition 1.

    No on Prop 1: The recently formed No on Proposition 1 committee has raised $134,798 since August 1, and data has yet to be made available on how the committee has spent its funds. In addition, the California Republican Party came out in opposition to the ballot measure. The California Catholic Conference has also come out in opposition to Proposition 1, with the Archbishop of San Francisco stating that “the California bishops have made defeating Prop. 1 our number one priority for this year.”
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 1 includes:

    The California Catholic Conference claims that Prop. 1 would “over-ride current law” to allow for “taxpayer-funded” abortion care. Prop. 1 simply makes explicit the current, common interpretation of the California State Constitution that already allows for abortion care and state assistance for those seeking to receive such health care. Also, because these rights already exist in California, the proposition would have no direct fiscal effect, meaning it would not create increased costs to taxpayers.
  • Endorsed By Courage California
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES on Prop 30

  • Vote YES on Proposition 30 to fund wildfire prevention, sustain wildfire-fighting resources, and reduce air pollution by expanding access to electric vehicles.


    Californians face health-threatening pollution and deadly wildfires every day. Piecemeal environmental reforms are important for mitigating some of climate change’s devastating effects, but our state must make bold investments if we’re going to make significant progress in our fight against climate change. Proposition 30 would tax the wealthiest Californians to fund wildfire prevention and help slash emissions statewide by expanding electric-vehicle access for all Californians, especially those living in heavily polluted and low-income communities.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 30 matters:

    The state’s Air Resources Board has planned and set targets for 100 percent of new cars sold in California to be zero-emissions vehicles by 2035. However, access to electric vehicles remains out of reach for many low- and middle-income Californians. The current average electric-vehicle owner in California is a white homeowner who makes $190,000 a year. Funding electric-vehicle infrastructure and providing rebates, grants, and financial assistance to make electric vehicles affordable is one major way that California can advance its statewide commitment to slashing emissions. At least half of the funds generated by Prop. 30 must be spent on projects that benefit heavily polluted and/or low-income communities.

    Proposition 30 would impose a 1.75% personal income tax increase on the wealthiest Californians—those who make more than $2 million per year—to fund wildfire prevention, wildfire fighting, and electric-vehicle access programs. Forty-five percent of the funding from Prop. 30 would go toward helping families, businesses, and local governments pay for zero-emissions vehicles; 35 percent would go toward installing and operating zero-emissions vehicle charging stations; and 20 percent would go toward wildfire prevention and fighting efforts, with the state being required to prioritize spending to hire, train, and retain firefighters. Per state analysts, Prop. 30 is estimated to increase state funding for electric-vehicle access and infrastructure by $2.8 billion to $4 billion annually, and the measure is also estimated to increase state funding for wildfire prevention and fighting by $700 million to $1 billion annually.

    As Californians are already experiencing, extreme wildfires are expected to increase by 50% worldwide by the end of the century, according to the United Nations, and the U.N. also warns that governments must do much more to address the issue. State analysts stated in a recent report earlier this year that additional wildfire funds are “merited” because of “the worsening pattern of large and severe wildfires in recent years.”
     

    Top funders of Proposition 30:

    The top funders of the main ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 30 are the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Lyft, and Zinc Collective. As of August 1, the Yes on 30 Clean Air California committee has raised $16 million and spent $14 million since Jan. 1, 2022. Other major supporters include the California Democratic Party, California Environmental Voters, the State Building and Construction Trades Council of California, Natural Resources Defense Council, and IE United.

    The recently formed No on 30 campaign has raised $9 million since August 1, 2022, mostly from billionaires Catherine Dean, Mark Heising, and Michael Mortiz. Other notable opposition to Proposition 30 includes the California Chamber of Commerce, Governor Gavin Newsom, the California Teachers Association, and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 30 includes:

    The California Chamber of Commerce claims that Proposition 30 is unnecessary because California has the “highest personal income tax rate in the country at 13.3%.” However, only Californians making over $1 million a year are taxed at that rate, and the average household income in 2020 dollars in California is $78,672.

    The California Teachers Association opposes Proposition 30 because funds raised from the measure would be exempt from a requirement that half of any new state revenues go to public education. Prop. 30 does not affect the current school-funding formula.

    The Yes on 30 committee does receive major funding from Lyft. The state requires ride-sharing companies to use more zero-emissions vehicles to provide ride-sharing services, so increasing the number of electric vehicles driven by Californians generally could indirectly help companies like Lyft reach their zero-emissions vehicle goals as mandated by the state. However, the ballot measure itself was written by environmental organizations, including California Environmental Voters, and the ballot measure language makes no mention of rideshare companies.

    Vote YES on Proposition 30 to fund wildfire prevention, sustain wildfire-fighting resources, and reduce air pollution by expanding access to electric vehicles.


    Californians face health-threatening pollution and deadly wildfires every day. Piecemeal environmental reforms are important for mitigating some of climate change’s devastating effects, but our state must make bold investments if we’re going to make significant progress in our fight against climate change. Proposition 30 would tax the wealthiest Californians to fund wildfire prevention and help slash emissions statewide by expanding electric-vehicle access for all Californians, especially those living in heavily polluted and low-income communities.
     

    Why voting YES on Proposition 30 matters:

    The state’s Air Resources Board has planned and set targets for 100 percent of new cars sold in California to be zero-emissions vehicles by 2035. However, access to electric vehicles remains out of reach for many low- and middle-income Californians. The current average electric-vehicle owner in California is a white homeowner who makes $190,000 a year. Funding electric-vehicle infrastructure and providing rebates, grants, and financial assistance to make electric vehicles affordable is one major way that California can advance its statewide commitment to slashing emissions. At least half of the funds generated by Prop. 30 must be spent on projects that benefit heavily polluted and/or low-income communities.

    Proposition 30 would impose a 1.75% personal income tax increase on the wealthiest Californians—those who make more than $2 million per year—to fund wildfire prevention, wildfire fighting, and electric-vehicle access programs. Forty-five percent of the funding from Prop. 30 would go toward helping families, businesses, and local governments pay for zero-emissions vehicles; 35 percent would go toward installing and operating zero-emissions vehicle charging stations; and 20 percent would go toward wildfire prevention and fighting efforts, with the state being required to prioritize spending to hire, train, and retain firefighters. Per state analysts, Prop. 30 is estimated to increase state funding for electric-vehicle access and infrastructure by $2.8 billion to $4 billion annually, and the measure is also estimated to increase state funding for wildfire prevention and fighting by $700 million to $1 billion annually.

    As Californians are already experiencing, extreme wildfires are expected to increase by 50% worldwide by the end of the century, according to the United Nations, and the U.N. also warns that governments must do much more to address the issue. State analysts stated in a recent report earlier this year that additional wildfire funds are “merited” because of “the worsening pattern of large and severe wildfires in recent years.”
     

    Top funders of Proposition 30:

    The top funders of the main ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 30 are the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Lyft, and Zinc Collective. As of August 1, the Yes on 30 Clean Air California committee has raised $16 million and spent $14 million since Jan. 1, 2022. Other major supporters include the California Democratic Party, California Environmental Voters, the State Building and Construction Trades Council of California, Natural Resources Defense Council, and IE United.

    The recently formed No on 30 campaign has raised $9 million since August 1, 2022, mostly from billionaires Catherine Dean, Mark Heising, and Michael Mortiz. Other notable opposition to Proposition 30 includes the California Chamber of Commerce, Governor Gavin Newsom, the California Teachers Association, and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 30 includes:

    The California Chamber of Commerce claims that Proposition 30 is unnecessary because California has the “highest personal income tax rate in the country at 13.3%.” However, only Californians making over $1 million a year are taxed at that rate, and the average household income in 2020 dollars in California is $78,672.

    The California Teachers Association opposes Proposition 30 because funds raised from the measure would be exempt from a requirement that half of any new state revenues go to public education. Prop. 30 does not affect the current school-funding formula.

    The Yes on 30 committee does receive major funding from Lyft. The state requires ride-sharing companies to use more zero-emissions vehicles to provide ride-sharing services, so increasing the number of electric vehicles driven by Californians generally could indirectly help companies like Lyft reach their zero-emissions vehicle goals as mandated by the state. However, the ballot measure itself was written by environmental organizations, including California Environmental Voters, and the ballot measure language makes no mention of rideshare companies.
  • Endorsed By Courage California
  • VOTE YES

    Vote YES on Proposition 31

  • Vote YES on Proposition 31 to uphold the current state law banning the sale and marketing of flavored tobacco products.


    In 2020, California’s state legislators passed a bipartisan bill to end the sale and marketing of candy-flavored tobacco products. The law is intended to help curb youth tobacco use. Now tobacco corporations are spending millions to stop the law from going into effect. Prop. 31 would uphold the law, ensure that it goes into effect, and penalize candy-flavored tobacco product sales in California with a $250 fine against stores per violation.

    Why voting YES on Proposition 31 matters:

    Candy-flavored tobacco products are especially appealing to children and young adults. A 2021 CDC survey found that over 70% of middle- and high-school students were exposed to tobacco ads, and 80% who use tobacco use flavored tobacco. According to a report from the Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, youth who use flavorings such as fruit or candy flavoring vape more compared to those who use “traditional” flavors of tobacco. Passing Prop. 31 and upholding the ban on the sale of candy-flavored tobacco products is critical for reducing youth tobacco use.

    The California State Legislature passed SB 793 in 2020 to end the sale and marketing of candy-flavored tobacco products in the state. By placing Prop. 31 on the ballot, the tobacco industry has effectively been able to use its wealth and resources to keep SB 793 from taking effect for two years. Now tobacco companies like Philip Morris are spending millions against the measure to further delay and ultimately overturn the ban.

    Top funders of Proposition 31:


    The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 31 are Michael Bloomberg, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc. and the Hospitals, and the California Teachers Association Issues PAC. As of August 1, the Yes on 31 committee has raised $3 million and spent $2 million since Jan. 1, 2022. Other supporters include the American Lung Association and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    The top funders of the ballot measure committee opposition Proposition 31 are tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Philip Morris USA, and ITG Brands. As of August 1, the No on 31 committee has raised $15 million and spent $743,566 since Jan. 1, 2022. The California Republican Party is also opposed to Prop. 31.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 31 includes:

    Tobacco companies claim that Prop. 31 is discriminatory because it criminalizes the sale of menthol cigarettes “preferred” by people of color. However, tobacco companies have been systematically targeting Black youth for decades with candy-flavored tobacco products. The share of Black Americans who smoke using minty menthols has dramatically increased since the 1950s because of tobacco corporations’ predatory marketing in Black communities.

    Vote YES on Proposition 31 to uphold the current state law banning the sale and marketing of flavored tobacco products.


    In 2020, California’s state legislators passed a bipartisan bill to end the sale and marketing of candy-flavored tobacco products. The law is intended to help curb youth tobacco use. Now tobacco corporations are spending millions to stop the law from going into effect. Prop. 31 would uphold the law, ensure that it goes into effect, and penalize candy-flavored tobacco product sales in California with a $250 fine against stores per violation.

    Why voting YES on Proposition 31 matters:

    Candy-flavored tobacco products are especially appealing to children and young adults. A 2021 CDC survey found that over 70% of middle- and high-school students were exposed to tobacco ads, and 80% who use tobacco use flavored tobacco. According to a report from the Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, youth who use flavorings such as fruit or candy flavoring vape more compared to those who use “traditional” flavors of tobacco. Passing Prop. 31 and upholding the ban on the sale of candy-flavored tobacco products is critical for reducing youth tobacco use.

    The California State Legislature passed SB 793 in 2020 to end the sale and marketing of candy-flavored tobacco products in the state. By placing Prop. 31 on the ballot, the tobacco industry has effectively been able to use its wealth and resources to keep SB 793 from taking effect for two years. Now tobacco companies like Philip Morris are spending millions against the measure to further delay and ultimately overturn the ban.

    Top funders of Proposition 31:


    The top funders of the ballot measure committee supporting Proposition 31 are Michael Bloomberg, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc. and the Hospitals, and the California Teachers Association Issues PAC. As of August 1, the Yes on 31 committee has raised $3 million and spent $2 million since Jan. 1, 2022. Other supporters include the American Lung Association and Governor Gavin Newsom.

    The top funders of the ballot measure committee opposition Proposition 31 are tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Philip Morris USA, and ITG Brands. As of August 1, the No on 31 committee has raised $15 million and spent $743,566 since Jan. 1, 2022. The California Republican Party is also opposed to Prop. 31.
     

    Misinformation about Proposition 31 includes:

    Tobacco companies claim that Prop. 31 is discriminatory because it criminalizes the sale of menthol cigarettes “preferred” by people of color. However, tobacco companies have been systematically targeting Black youth for decades with candy-flavored tobacco products. The share of Black Americans who smoke using minty menthols has dramatically increased since the 1950s because of tobacco corporations’ predatory marketing in Black communities.
  • Endorsed By Courage California

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below ballot measures on your ballot.

Voting has changed in Los Angeles County this year. The Voter’s Choice Act was enacted in the county to make voting more convenient. Changes include an expanded period of in-person early voting, every registered voter in the county will receive a vote-by-mail ballot, and every registered voter in the county is able to vote in-person at any Vote Center in their county. Also, in-person voters in Los Angeles County will have the opportunity to use the new Ballot Marking Device, a touchscreen with audio features, to mark their ballots. Have questions about the changes to voting in Los Angeles County? Find out how to vote in Los Angeles County.

  • VOTE APPROVED

    Vote YES to improve accountability for the LA County Sheriff

  • Vote YES on Measure A to provide the L.A. County Board of Supervisors with the power to remove a sheriff from office for cause.



    The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department’s history is one rife with mismanagement, corruption, and the infliction of brutality on county residents. Currently, the sheriff can only be removed by recall or by the convening of a grand jury, which can take months. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted on August 2, 2022, to place a measure on the November ballot that, if approved by voters, would give the supervisors the authority to quickly remove a publicly elected sheriff from office “for cause.”

    “For cause” is defined by the measure as “a violation of any law related to the performance of their duties as Sheriff; flagrant or repeated neglect of duties; a misappropriation of public funds or property; willful falsification of a relevant official statement or document; or obstruction of any investigation into the conduct of the Sheriff by the Inspector General, Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission, or any government agency with jurisdiction to conduct such an investigation.”
     

    Why voting YES on Measure A matters:


    Sheriff Alex Villanueva is one of the most corrupt, extremist sheriffs in the history of Los Angeles County—he famously has refused to comply with oversight procedures and has been accused of retaining a “secret police” force within LASD for political investigation and intimidation. He is also far from the only sheriff who has abused the powers of the office. In 2014, for example, Sheriff Lee Baca resigned during an ongoing FBI investigation and was imprisoned for obstruction of justice and lying to federal investigators. Currently, the Board of Supervisors is able to engage in limited oversight by assessing how it allocates funds for the Sheriff Department’s budget, and the Supervisors also created the Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission in 2016. These existing accountability mechanisms are important, but they often depend somewhat on the sheriff’s cooperation. Voting yes on Measure A to allow the Board of Supervisors to remove the sheriff for cause provides another tool for accountability where there are few.
    Recall elections are costly to taxpayers and often involve low levels of participation from voters, allowing affluent groups to influence election outcomes more than under usual circumstances. Measure A would allow the Board to act expeditiously to remove a corrupt sheriff rather than wait months or years for a recall election to be held.
     

    Top funders of Measure A:


    Currently, no ballot measure committee has been formed in support of Measure A. Notable supporters of Measure A include the ACLU of Southern California and Dignity and Power Now.
    One committee, the Mexican American Political Association PAC to Oppose Measure A, has been formed in opposition to the measure, although current publicly available data shows the committee has yet to raise funds.

    Vote YES on Measure A to provide the L.A. County Board of Supervisors with the power to remove a sheriff from office for cause.



    The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department’s history is one rife with mismanagement, corruption, and the infliction of brutality on county residents. Currently, the sheriff can only be removed by recall or by the convening of a grand jury, which can take months. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted on August 2, 2022, to place a measure on the November ballot that, if approved by voters, would give the supervisors the authority to quickly remove a publicly elected sheriff from office “for cause.”

    “For cause” is defined by the measure as “a violation of any law related to the performance of their duties as Sheriff; flagrant or repeated neglect of duties; a misappropriation of public funds or property; willful falsification of a relevant official statement or document; or obstruction of any investigation into the conduct of the Sheriff by the Inspector General, Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission, or any government agency with jurisdiction to conduct such an investigation.”
     

    Why voting YES on Measure A matters:


    Sheriff Alex Villanueva is one of the most corrupt, extremist sheriffs in the history of Los Angeles County—he famously has refused to comply with oversight procedures and has been accused of retaining a “secret police” force within LASD for political investigation and intimidation. He is also far from the only sheriff who has abused the powers of the office. In 2014, for example, Sheriff Lee Baca resigned during an ongoing FBI investigation and was imprisoned for obstruction of justice and lying to federal investigators. Currently, the Board of Supervisors is able to engage in limited oversight by assessing how it allocates funds for the Sheriff Department’s budget, and the Supervisors also created the Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission in 2016. These existing accountability mechanisms are important, but they often depend somewhat on the sheriff’s cooperation. Voting yes on Measure A to allow the Board of Supervisors to remove the sheriff for cause provides another tool for accountability where there are few.
    Recall elections are costly to taxpayers and often involve low levels of participation from voters, allowing affluent groups to influence election outcomes more than under usual circumstances. Measure A would allow the Board to act expeditiously to remove a corrupt sheriff rather than wait months or years for a recall election to be held.
     

    Top funders of Measure A:


    Currently, no ballot measure committee has been formed in support of Measure A. Notable supporters of Measure A include the ACLU of Southern California and Dignity and Power Now.
    One committee, the Mexican American Political Association PAC to Oppose Measure A, has been formed in opposition to the measure, although current publicly available data shows the committee has yet to raise funds.
  • Endorsed By Courage California

Depending on where you live, you may have the below city races on your ballot.

  • Karen Bass

    Courage California endorses Karen Bass for LA mayor to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Karen Bass

    Courage California endorses Karen Bass for LA mayor to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

    Karen Bass

    Courage California endorses Karen Bass for LA mayor to keep Los Angeles on the right track for progress.

  • Endorsed By: Courage California