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The Courage California Voter Guide compiles the information that allows you to make informed decisions about the races on your ballot, based on your values. Vote in every race on your ballot! It's our right and our responsibility. Please share this guide with your friends and family.

Voting has changed in Los Angeles County this year. The Voter’s Choice Act was enacted in the county to make voting more convenient. Changes include an expanded period of in-person early voting, every registered voter in the county will receive a vote-by-mail ballot, and every registered voter in the county is able to vote in-person at any Vote Center in their county. Also, in-person voters in Los Angeles County will have the opportunity to use the new Ballot Marking Device, a touchscreen with audio features, to mark their ballots. Have questions about the changes to voting in Los Angeles County? Find out how to vote in Los Angeles County.

City of Burbank

Burbank City Council

  • Elect City Council Member Konstantine Anthony to push Burbank in the right direction.

    Konstantine Anthony, chair of the Burbank Transportation Commission and member of the Burbank Advisory Council on Disabilities, has lived in Burbank since 2004. According to campaign materials, Anthony is running for election to offer his life experience, passion, and dedication as a working-class Democrat in service to the city of Burbank.

    Konstantine Anthony’s priorities for Burbank this term include enacting rent control, building a fully-functional homeless shelter under the Housing First model, demilitarizing the police and reforming use-of-force laws, increasing and scaling the minimum wage according to the number of employees a business has, adopting a Community Workforce Agreement to incentivize local hiring, expanding Burbank’s outdoor WiFi offerings to stretch citywide, further connecting bike paths and lowering congestion through improved bus lanes, and piloting a Universal Basic Income program similar to what was championed by Mayor Michael Tubbs of Stockton, CA.

    He is co-founder of the Mobile Workers Alliance and the Burbank Tenants' Rights Committee, organizations that have respectively fought against Prop 22 and for Burbank’s rent-control measure. In addition to his civil and nonprofit service, Anthony has firsthand experience working in the gig economy and was unhoused for a time in 2015, further informing his stances on workers’ protections, the importance of unions, and investing in humane and compassionate treatment for the homeless. He is a longtime supporter of renters’ rights, disability rights, LGBTQIA+ rights, Medicare for All, and the Green New Deal.

    Konstantine Anthony is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district, including the LA County Democratic Party, Stonewall Democratic Club, San Fernando Valley and LA County Young Democrats, California Democratic Renters Council, Abundant Housing LA, Streets for All, Ground Game LA, the Democratic Socialists of America, Our Revolution, Sunrise Movement, and the Sierra Club, as well as a number of labor unions. According to our analysis, Konstantine Anthony is a strong choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Konstantine Anthony, chair of the Burbank Transportation Commission and member of the Burbank Advisory Council on Disabilities, has lived in Burbank since 2004. According to campaign materials, Anthony is running for election to offer his life experience, passion, and dedication as a working-class Democrat in service to the city of Burbank.
    Last updated: 2020-10-29
  • Non-Partisan
  • Elect City Council Member Sharis Manokian to push Burbank in the right direction.

    Sharis Manokian, an educator and youth organization volunteer, is a lifelong Burbank resident. According to campaign materials, Manokian’s priorities for her district this term include extending rental assistance to Burbank residents, lowering annual rent increases from 5% to 3%, enacting rent control for commercial properties to help small businesses weather the COVID-19 crisis, reallocating funds to better support the Burbank Unified School District, and moving police money away from purchasing military surplus and towards de-escalation training and education.

    Sharis Manokian’s time as a teacher in the Burbank Unified School District spurred her decision to run for City Council. She has noted that Burbank receives the lowest amount of per-capita funding of all LA County school districts. She holds a degree in Economics from UC Irvine, which she believes improves her ability to tackle complex budget issues and stimulus initiatives. Outside of the classroom, Sharis volunteers with the Armenian youth scouting organization Homenetmen.

    Sharis Manokian is endorsed by Streets for All and the Los Angeles Feel the Bern Democratic Club. According to our analysis, Sharis Manokian is a strong choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Sharis Manokian, an educator and youth organization volunteer, is a lifelong Burbank resident. According to campaign materials, Manokian’s priorities for her district this term include extending rental assistance to Burbank residents, lowering annual rent increases from 5% to 3%, enacting rent control for commercial properties to help small businesses weather the COVID-19 crisis, reallocating funds to better support the Burbank Unified School District, and moving police money away from purchasing military surplus and towards de-escalation training and education.
    Last updated: 2020-10-29

Long Beach City Council

Long Beach City Council, District #6

  • Non-Partisan
  • Elect Suely Saro for City Council to push Long Beach in the right direction.

    About the Position

    Incorporated cities in California are generally governed by a five-person city council. A city council is responsible for establishing policy, passing local laws (called ordinances), voting on budget appropriations, and developing an overall vision for the city. City council members in Long Beach are ‎limited to three terms.

    About the District

    Long Beach is Los Angeles County’s second most populous city. Long Beach City Council oversees the needs of 494,709 people, according to the 2010 Census, and manages an estimated budget of $2.5 to $3 million annually. Long Beach is managed by a mayor-council structured government. Long Beach’s District 6 includes Long Beach Community College, Burnett Library, and the neighborhood of Wrigley.

    About the Race

    In the March 3 primary election, challenger Suely Saro led incumbent Councilmember Dee Andrew by a margin of 16.21 percent. Saro’s campaign has raised $109,905, and while it is not funded by corporate PACs, fossil fuels, or police money, she has yet to pledge to refuse donations from those groups. Councilmember Dee’s campaign has raised $74,976. He has not committed to any of the pledges and is backed by problematic donors, like Long Beach Police Officers Association and Southern California Edison.

    About the Candidate

    Saro, an adjunct faculty member at CSU Los Angeles, is an immigrant, born to parents who survived the Cambodian genocide and found refuge in Los Angeles, then Long Beach. Saro was the first Cambodian American executive director of Khmer Girls in Action and currently serves as board chair of the Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) Professional Network in Long Beach. Additionally, she joined the Health Access Project at Asian Americans Advancing Justice Los Angeles and co-founded the Women for Women Foundation, for which she is the board chair. She is a longtime supporter of labor rights and public safety, having previously served as chair of Long Beach’s Citizen Police Complaint Commission. According to campaign materials, Saro is running for election to fight for equity for working families, youth, immigrants, and women.

    Saro’s priorities for Long Beach this term include economic development and opportunities, housing solutions and livable neighborhoods, improving infrastructure and public safety, protecting the environment, and promoting health equity and accessibility across District 6. Saro’s detailed plans can be accessed in full on her campaign website, linked below.

    Saro is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups and officials, such as the Working Families Party, several local chapters of Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and three of the current Long Beach City Councilmembers. At this time, Saro does not have any problematic endorsements. According to our analysis, Suely Saro is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Suely Saro

    Elect Suely Saro for City Council to push Long Beach in the right direction.

    About the Position

    Incorporated cities in California are generally governed by a five-person city council.

    Last updated: 2020-10-09

Long Beach City Council, District #8

  • Non-Partisan
  • Elect City Council Member Tunua Thrash-Ntuk to push Long Beach in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The Long Beach City Council comprises nine council districts. Each council member is elected by the voters of the district they represent. A city council is responsible for establishing policy, passing local laws (called ordinances), voting on budget appropriations, and developing an overall vision for the city. City council members in Long Beach are ‎limited to three terms, or 12 years in office total.

    About the District

    Long Beach is Los Angeles County District 8’s most populous city. Long Beach City Council oversees the needs of 462,268 people and manages an estimated budget of about $3 billion annually. Long Beach uses a council-manager structure of government. Long Beach City’s District 8 includes neighborhoods in Bixby Knolls and North Long Beach.  

    About the Race

    Following the March 3 primary election, challenger Thrash-Ntuk is leading incumbent Al Austin by a margin of 6.3 percent. Her campaign has raised $79,584.92 and she has signed the No Cop Money in California pledge, but has not committed to refusing corporate PAC or fossil fuel money. Austin’s campaign has raised around half the amount as Thrash-Ntuk, with $42,634.92, and has also not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Tunua Thrash-Ntuk is a native Angeleno and the executive director of Los Angeles Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LA LISC), which supports community development across the country. According to campaign materials, Thrash-Ntuk is running for election to advocate for inclusionary housing policies and economic development. Thrash-Ntuk’s priorities for Long Beach this term include investing in affordable housing, economic development, health, financial stability, and leadership development.

    Thrash-Ntuk is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and is a 15-year community and economic development practitioner with experience in the nonprofit and private sectors. She is a longtime supporter of urban initiatives, focusing on affordable housing, commercial development, and transit-oriented projects. Prior to her work at LISC, Thrash-Ntuk served as executive director of West Angeles Community Development Corporation, during which she was responsible for asset management and oversight of the entity’s real estate portfolio. She serves as a board member and advisory board member to many organizations, including the Federal Home Loan Bank San Francisco’s Affordable Housing Council, Housing California, and the City of L.A. Measure HHH Citizens Oversight Commission.

    Tunua Thrash-Ntuk is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district including Working Families Party California. Austin is endorsed by two police groups. Austin has been criticized for voting in 2017 against a proposal requiring hotels to provide workers with panic buttons to safeguard against sexual harassment or assault and then for giving tiny panic buttons as Christmas gag gifts to women councilmembers. He later voted to add a similar measure to the ballot in 2018, which voters approved. According to our analysis, Thrash-Ntuk is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Tunua Thrash-Ntuk

    Elect City Council Member Tunua Thrash-Ntuk to push Long Beach in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The Long Beach City Council comprises nine council districts. Each council member is elected by the voters of the district they represent.

    Last updated: 2020-10-09

Los Angeles City Council

Los Angeles City Council, District 4

  • Non-Partisan
  • Elect City Council Member Nithya Raman to push Los Angeles in the right direction. 

    About the Position
    The city of Los Angeles is governed by a fifteen-person city council. A city council is responsible for establishing policy, passing local laws (called ordinances), voting on budget appropriations, and developing an overall vision for the city. City council members in Los Angeles are ‎limited to three terms or 12 years in office total. 

    About the District
    The City of Los Angeles is Los Angeles County’s most populous city. Los Angeles City Council oversees the needs of almost 4 million people and manages an estimated budget of $10.3 billion annually. Los Angeles is managed by a mayor-council structured government. Los Angeles’s District 4 includes the neighborhoods of Koreatown, Mid-Wilshire, Sherman Oaks, Hollywood, Griffith Park, and Los Feliz. 

    About the Race
    In the primary, challenger Raman trailed incumbent David E. Ryu by a margin of 3.6 percent. Raman’s campaign has raised about $357,000 and has pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, police, and corporate money. Raman’s bid has been supported by a coalition of volunteer organizers who knocked on almost 80,000 doors in the district. Ryu’s campaign has raised more than $1 million, at least $149,000 of which is from out-of-district donors, including a board member of a planned museum that is leasing land from the city. Ryu has also taken the pledge to refuse fossil fuel and police money, although he had already received and spent police funds. He also pledged to refuse developer money, but still received such funds and claimed to have returned it. 

    About the Candidate

    Raman, a trained urban planner, lives in the Silverlake neighborhood of Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, she is running to represent District 4 on the city council to build a more inclusive and just Los Angeles.

    Raman is running on a strongly progressive platform that promises to center the voices and needs of underserved communities in Los Angeles. Her knowledge of policy is clearly demonstrated in her platform, which focuses on addressing housing and homelessness, responding to the climate emergency, and bringing Angelenos into the lawmaking process to increase transparency and accountability in city policymaking.

    She is a co-founder of SELAH Neighborhood Homeless Coalition, a local neighborhood-based organization formed in response to the city’s inaction on homelessness. She has also served as co-chair of the Silver Lake Neighborhood Council’s Homelessness Committee since 2017. Raman recently served as executive director of Time’s Up Entertainment, the women’s rights movement furthering equity and safety for women in the entertainment industry. Raman’s relationships in entertainment are strong, and her campaign is based on partnering with artists and performers as a rallying force for its organizing efforts.

    Raman is the best choice because of her strong understanding of the challenges facing the city of Los Angeles as detailed in her policy platform, her track record of leading the way in standing up for communities under attack, and her ability to connect with and engage people currently outside of the political process.

    While endorsements are split in the race, Raman’s endorsers are, on the whole, the most progressive in the district, while Ryu’s tend to be more moderate. According to our analysis, Raman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Nithya Raman

    Elect City Council Member Nithya Raman to push Los Angeles in the right direction. 

    About the Position

    Last updated: 2020-10-20

Los Angeles City Council, District 10

No Recommendation

About the Candidate

Mark Ridley-Thomas, a career politician who has held many offices, is from Los Angeles. Ridley-Thomas’s stated priorities for his district this term include addressing the homelessness and affordable housing crises, reimagining public transit as fully electric and environmentally sustainable, and reforming the justice system with more rehabilitative alternatives to prison. He has secured more than $1 billion in County resources into the 10th District which was used to extend Metro transit lines, build affordable housing, develop and beautify parks and plant trees. Prior to serving on the Board of Supervisors, where he is completing his third term, Ridley-Thomas represented the 26th District in the California State Senate, chairing the California Legislative Black Caucus.

While Mark Ridley-Thomas has demonstrated an ability to deliver on many campaign promises to his district, such as ensuring the completion of the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital, his time in the public eye includes a number of scandals, largely having to do with inappropriate use of taxpayer money. In 2010 Ridley-Thomas spent $25,000 to place himself and fourteen other county officials in the Who's Who edition of Black Los Angeles. In 2018, Ridley-Thomas was put under federal criminal investigation for a $100,000 donation he made to USC, intended to be allocated to a think tank run by his son and resigned state assembly member Sebastian Ridley-Thomas.

Additionally, Mark Ridley-Thomas has accepted money from the fossil fuel industry, including E&B Natural Resources Management, which operates a drill site in his district. Due to his conflicted history as a public servant, we cannot recommend him for your progressive vote.


No Recommendation

About the Candidate

Grace Yoo, an attorney and activist, is from Los Angeles. Yoo’s stated priorities for her district this term include updating planning and zoning laws, ensuring funding for regular street and park maintenance, identifying which tasks are assigned to law enforcement that could be better handled by other agencies, and demilitarizing the police. She has represented abused and neglected children for L.A. County’s Children’s Law Center, expanded language access in the courtroom as executive director of the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, and served as commissioner and vice president of the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation.

Grace Yoo has been criticized for a lack of concrete policy proposals and for leading an anti-homeless campaign against a shelter proposal that involved using shipping container homes, tiny homes, and semi-permanent structures to house the homeless.

Yoo also seems to support a problematic approach to criminal justice reform, suggesting that she does not believe in systemic racism or understand the over policing of Black, brown, and lower-income communities. 

Due to Grace Yoo’s conflicted stances on treating unhoused citizens and law enforcement reform, we cannot recommend her for your progressive vote.


 


Los Angeles Community College Board

Los Angeles Community College Trustee, Seat No. 1

  • Elect Charné Tunson to make the Los Angeles Community College District Board more reflective of its highly diverse student population. 

    About the Position

    Members of the Los Angeles Community College District Board are elected at large for terms of four years. Elections are held every two years, with three members being chosen at one election and four members at the other.\

    About the District

    The Los Angeles Community College District is located in Los Angeles County and includes nine colleges, serving a population of roughly 240,000 Californians.

    About the Candidate

    Charné Tunson, a former Crenshaw High School teacher, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. Tunson and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    In addition to teaching at Crenshaw High School, her alma mater, Charné Tunson recently founded the Tunson Leadership Foundation, aiming to impart the importance of community engagement and mentorship within local communities.

    According to our analysis, Charné Tunson and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Charné Tunson

    Elect Charné Tunson to make the Los Angeles Community College District Board more reflective of its highly diverse student population. 

    About the Position

    Members of the Los Angeles Community College District Board are elected at large for terms of four years. Elections are held every two years, with three members being chosen at one election and four members at the other.\

    About the District

    The Los Angeles Community College District is located in Los Angeles County and includes nine colleges, serving a population of roughly 240,000 Californians.

    About the Candidate

    Charné Tunson, a former Crenshaw High School teacher, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. Tunson and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    In addition to teaching at Crenshaw High School, her alma mater, Charné Tunson recently founded the Tunson Leadership Foundation, aiming to impart the importance of community engagement and mentorship within local communities.

    According to our analysis, Charné Tunson and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Community College
    Last updated: 2020-10-12

Los Angeles Community College Trustee, Seat No. 3

  • Elect Sylvia Brooks Griffin to make the Los Angeles Community College District Board more reflective of its highly diverse student population. 

    About the Position

    Members of the Los Angeles Community College District Board are elected at large for terms of four years. Elections are held every two years, with three members being chosen at one election and four members at the other.

    About the District

    The Los Angeles Community College District is located in Los Angeles County and includes nine colleges, serving a population of roughly 240,000 Californians.

    About the Candidate

    Sylvia Brooks Griffin, a special-needs advocate who is active with LAUSD and the Down Syndrome Association of Los Angeles, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. Griffin and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    According to our analysis, Sylvia Brooks Griffin and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Sylvia Brooks Griffin

    Elect Sylvia Brooks Griffin to make the Los Angeles Community College District Board more reflective of its highly diverse student population. 

    About the Position

    Members of the Los Angeles Community College District Board are elected at large for terms of four years. Elections are held every two years, with three members being chosen at one election and four members at the other.

    About the District

    The Los Angeles Community College District is located in Los Angeles County and includes nine colleges, serving a population of roughly 240,000 Californians.

    About the Candidate

    Sylvia Brooks Griffin, a special-needs advocate who is active with LAUSD and the Down Syndrome Association of Los Angeles, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. Griffin and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    According to our analysis, Sylvia Brooks Griffin and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Community College
    Last updated: 2020-10-12

Los Angeles Community College Trustee, Seat No. 5

  • Nichelle M. Henderson, an academic faculty advisor and teacher/lecturer at California State University Los Angeles, is a lifelong LA resident. She is a leader in the California Faculty Association (CFA)/SEIU 1983 where she is CSULA Chapter Vice President, a member and former Chair of the Faculty Rights Team, and a member of the statewide Bargaining and Representation Teams. In addition to her union work, Nichelle is actively involved in several community based clubs and committees, serving as the 1st Vice President of the Los Angeles African American Women PAC and an elected delegate to the Los Angeles County Democratic Central Committee representing Assembly District 66; where she serves as the Co-Chair of the Credentials Team and Region 5 Vice Chair. If elected to office, Henderson promises to focus on increasing funding and offering greater accountability to students and citizens, enhancing student services such as academic and mental health counseling, offering vocational education and dual enrollment for high school Juniors and Senior, and improving outreach and recruitment to underserved groups such as people of color, the LGBTQIA+ community, foster youth, and the formerly incarcerated.

    Nichelle M. Henderson is endorsed by many progressive organizations such as the Stonewall Young Democrats/Democratic Club, the San Fernando Valley Young Democrats, Black Women Organized for Political Action, Women Count, a number of local trade unions, and Courage California endorsee Holly J. Mitchell. According to our analysis, Nichelle M. Henderson will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Nichelle M. Henderson

    Nichelle M. Henderson, an academic faculty advisor and teacher/lecturer at California State University Los Angeles, is a lifelong LA resident. She is a leader in the California Faculty Association (CFA)/SEIU 1983 where she is CSULA Chapter Vice President, a member and former Chair of the Faculty Rights Team, and a member of the statewide Bargaining and Representation Teams. In addition to her union work, Nichelle is actively involved in several community based clubs and committees, serving as the 1st Vice President of the Los Angeles African American Women PAC and an elected delegate to the Los Angeles County Democratic Central Committee representing Assembly District 66; where she serves as the Co-Chair of the Credentials Team and Region 5 Vice Chair. If elected to office, Henderson promises to focus on increasing funding and offering greater accountability to students and citizens, enhancing student services such as academic and mental health counseling, offering vocational education and dual enrollment for high school Juniors and Senior, and improving outreach and recruitment to underserved groups such as people of color, the LGBTQIA+ community, foster youth, and the formerly incarcerated.

    Nichelle M. Henderson is endorsed by many progressive organizations such as the Stonewall Young Democrats/Democratic Club, the San Fernando Valley Young Democrats, Black Women Organized for Political Action, Women Count, a number of local trade unions, and Courage California endorsee Holly J. Mitchell. According to our analysis, Nichelle M. Henderson will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Community College
    Last updated: 2020-10-12
  • Dr. Nichet James-Gray, a teacher and proud LACC parent, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. James-Gray and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    According to our analysis, Dr. Nichet James-Gray and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Dr. Nichet James-Gray

    Dr. Nichet James-Gray, a teacher and proud LACC parent, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. James-Gray and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    According to our analysis, Dr. Nichet James-Gray and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.


     

    Community College
    Last updated: 2020-10-12

Los Angeles Community College Trustee, Seat No. 7

  • Elect Mike Fong to continue progressive and equitable leadership for the diverse LACCD community.

    Mike Fong, a lifelong Angeleno and the District 7 incumbent, currently serves as Director of Policy and Government Relations for the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment. As an LACCD board member, Fong created job-training programs and collaborated with Mayor Eric Garcetti on the Los Angeles College Promise program, making two years of community college tuition-free expanding college access for thousands of local students. He supported the creation of Dream Resource Centers and secured additional resources and partnerships to address food insecurity and housing insecurity. Fong also supported the African American Outreach Initiative and LACCD Framework for Racial Equity and Social Justice.

    According to campaign materials, Mike Fong’s continued goals for his next term include expanding workforce education and high-growth sector job training programs, expanding dual enrollment programs enabling high school students to enroll in college courses, and increasing access to distance learning technology.

    Additionally, Mike Fong’s long record of community leadership includes serving as Chair of the PBS Southern California Asian Pacific Islander Community Council, Vice Chair of the White Memorial Medical Center Community Leadership Council, and Southern Vice Chair of the California Democratic Party’s Asian Pacific Islander Caucus.

    According to our analysis, Mike Fong will continue to provide progressive and equitable leadership for the diverse LACCD community.

     

    Mike Fong

    Elect Mike Fong to continue progressive and equitable leadership for the diverse LACCD community.

    Mike Fong, a lifelong Angeleno and the District 7 incumbent, currently serves as Director of Policy and Government Relations for the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment. As an LACCD board member, Fong created job-training programs and collaborated with Mayor Eric Garcetti on the Los Angeles College Promise program, making two years of community college tuition-free expanding college access for thousands of local students. He supported the creation of Dream Resource Centers and secured additional resources and partnerships to address food insecurity and housing insecurity. Fong also supported the African American Outreach Initiative and LACCD Framework for Racial Equity and Social Justice.

    According to campaign materials, Mike Fong’s continued goals for his next term include expanding workforce education and high-growth sector job training programs, expanding dual enrollment programs enabling high school students to enroll in college courses, and increasing access to distance learning technology.

    Additionally, Mike Fong’s long record of community leadership includes serving as Chair of the PBS Southern California Asian Pacific Islander Community Council, Vice Chair of the White Memorial Medical Center Community Leadership Council, and Southern Vice Chair of the California Democratic Party’s Asian Pacific Islander Caucus.

    According to our analysis, Mike Fong will continue to provide progressive and equitable leadership for the diverse LACCD community.

     

    Community College
    Last updated: 2020-10-22
  • Elect Raquel Watts to make the Los Angeles Community College District Board more reflective of its highly diverse student population.

    Raquel Watts, a legal representative serving injured workers in their fight for benefits, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. Watts and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    In addition to her 28 years of service in the workers’ compensation field, Raquel Watts is a long-standing volunteer at Crenshaw Christian Center. As an undergraduate at USC, she was executive director of Troy Camp and president of the Student Committee on Admissions and Recruitment, advocating for underserved applicants.

    According to our analysis, Raquel Watts and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.

    Raquel Watts

    Elect Raquel Watts to make the Los Angeles Community College District Board more reflective of its highly diverse student population.

    Raquel Watts, a legal representative serving injured workers in their fight for benefits, is running as part of a coalition called Justice 4 LACCD, a coalition of four Black women seeking to diversify the board to reflect the 74 percent POC and 56 percent women student population it serves. Watts and Justice 4 LACCD are running on the shared values of what they call “The 4 R’s,” which are defined on their website as the following:

    • “Representation – We are a united group of women who will make up a Board of Trustees that truly reflects and speaks on behalf of the LACCD community it serves.
    • Recruitment and Retention – Creating policy to attract, retain and support more students and faculty that are under-represented. This includes more women, students and faculty of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community and those with disabilities.
    • Reform – Designate a committee to investigate police policy and response on LACCD campuses.
    • Response to COVID-19 – Position our Community Colleges to lead in creating an equitable COVID strategy that prioritizes the needs of the most impacted members of our community.”

    Furthermore, the coalition promises to fight for the rights of part-time, disabled, and unhoused students, as well as those with health conditions that prevent them from regularly accessing a college campus.

    In addition to her 28 years of service in the workers’ compensation field, Raquel Watts is a long-standing volunteer at Crenshaw Christian Center. As an undergraduate at USC, she was executive director of Troy Camp and president of the Student Committee on Admissions and Recruitment, advocating for underserved applicants.

    According to our analysis, Raquel Watts and the Justice 4 LACCD coalition will provide leadership that promotes the shared interests of communities historically excluded from the policymaking process.

    Community College
    Last updated: 2020-10-22

Central Basin Municipal Water District

Division 1

  • Re-elect Central Basin Municipal Water District Board Member Martha Camacho-Rodriguez to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Central Basin Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Los Angeles County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services across 227 square miles in Los Angeles County and some unincorporated areas. Central Basin directors represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Central’s Division 1 contains the cities of Bell Gardens, Downey, Montebello, Pico Rivera, West Whittier-Los Nietos, and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County.

    About the Candidate

    In addition to serving District 1 of the Central Basin Municipal Water District since 2018, Martha Camacho-Rodriguez is a member of the Cerritos College Board of Trustees. Her record of community service includes such organizations as Restore the Delta, Food and Water Watch, the Sierra Club of Los Angeles, and Dignity and Power. She is a grassroots educator/organizer with Social Eco Education in Southeast Los Angeles.

    The Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters endorses Martha Camacho-Rodriguez, saying that “she is the type of environmental champion we need for the Central Basin Municipal Water District. During the last two years she has been in office, she has been a consistent environmental justice voice on the board and an advocate for keeping our water resources under public control. Recently, her leadership led to resolving the impasse on the Board of Directors and passing a balanced budget. In her next term, she hopes to grow community partnerships and address the contamination in local water wells.”

    According to our analysis and that of our partners, Martha Camacho-Rodriguez is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

     

    Martha Camacho-Rodriguez

    Submitted by deepthi on Thu, 10/15/2020 - 08:51

    Re-elect Central Basin Municipal Water District Board Member Martha Camacho-Rodriguez to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Central Basin Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Los Angeles County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services across 227 square miles in Los Angeles County and some unincorporated areas. Central Basin directors represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Central’s Division 1 contains the cities of Bell Gardens, Downey, Montebello, Pico Rivera, West Whittier-Los Nietos, and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County.

    About the Candidate

    In addition to serving District 1 of the Central Basin Municipal Water District since 2018, Martha Camacho-Rodriguez is a member of the Cerritos College Board of Trustees. Her record of community service includes such organizations as Restore the Delta, Food and Water Watch, the Sierra Club of Los Angeles, and Dignity and Power. She is a grassroots educator/organizer with Social Eco Education in Southeast Los Angeles.

    The Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters endorses Martha Camacho-Rodriguez, saying that “she is the type of environmental champion we need for the Central Basin Municipal Water District. During the last two years she has been in office, she has been a consistent environmental justice voice on the board and an advocate for keeping our water resources under public control. Recently, her leadership led to resolving the impasse on the Board of Directors and passing a balanced budget. In her next term, she hopes to grow community partnerships and address the contamination in local water wells.”

    According to our analysis and that of our partners, Martha Camacho-Rodriguez is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

     

    Water District
    Last updated: 2020-10-15

Santa Clarita Valley Water District

Division 2

  • Elect Santa Clarita Valley Water District Board Member Valerie Bradford to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Santa Clarita Valley Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Three Valleys directors represent each of the District's seven divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Santa Clarita’s Division 2 contains the city of Santa Clara and surrounding cities/unincorporated areas.

    About the Candidate

    Valerie Bradford, a former human resources professional, has lived in the Santa Clarita Valley for fifteen years. A lifelong community activist, Bradford has volunteered with the College of the Canyons, Covenant House LA, Hope Gardens, and Hope of Valley, as well as traveled to Haiti to assist with disaster relief. She promises to put water cleanliness, affordability, and sustainability at the forefront as she expands public education initiatives within her district.

    Valerie Bradford boasts endorsements from Our Revolution Santa Clarita Valley, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the Sierra Club. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Bradford is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Valerie Bradford

    Submitted by deepthi on Thu, 10/15/2020 - 09:01

    Elect Santa Clarita Valley Water District Board Member Valerie Bradford to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Santa Clarita Valley Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Three Valleys directors represent each of the District's seven divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Santa Clarita’s Division 2 contains the city of Santa Clara and surrounding cities/unincorporated areas.

    About the Candidate

    Valerie Bradford, a former human resources professional, has lived in the Santa Clarita Valley for fifteen years. A lifelong community activist, Bradford has volunteered with the College of the Canyons, Covenant House LA, Hope Gardens, and Hope of Valley, as well as traveled to Haiti to assist with disaster relief. She promises to put water cleanliness, affordability, and sustainability at the forefront as she expands public education initiatives within her district.

    Valerie Bradford boasts endorsements from Our Revolution Santa Clarita Valley, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the Sierra Club. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Bradford is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Water District
    Last updated: 2020-10-15

Division 3

  • Elect Santa Clarita Valley Water District Board Member Kathye Armitage to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Santa Clarita Valley Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Three Valleys directors represent each of the District's seven divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Santa Clarita’s Division 3 contains San Jose, Milpitas, and surrounding cities/unincorporated areas.

    About the Candidate

    Kathye Armitage, a former Los Angeles County Department of Public Health employee and current Groundwater Sustainability Agency member, has lived in the Santa Clarita Valley for seventeen years. Her priorities for her district include advancing the filtering of ammonium perchlorate and PFAS from the water supply, decreasing reliance on imported water, making community summits for citizen participation free to attend, and sharing projects and meeting results consistently on social media to increase transparency. She is near the completion of a certificate in water systems technology from the College of the Canyons and plans to apply her education directly if elected to office.

    Kathye Armitage boasts endorsements from the Stonewall Democratic Club, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the Sierra Club. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Armitage is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Kathye Armitage

    Submitted by deepthi on Thu, 10/15/2020 - 09:04

    Elect Santa Clarita Valley Water District Board Member Kathye Armitage to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Santa Clarita Valley Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Three Valleys directors represent each of the District's seven divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Santa Clarita’s Division 3 contains San Jose, Milpitas, and surrounding cities/unincorporated areas.

    About the Candidate

    Kathye Armitage, a former Los Angeles County Department of Public Health employee and current Groundwater Sustainability Agency member, has lived in the Santa Clarita Valley for seventeen years. Her priorities for her district include advancing the filtering of ammonium perchlorate and PFAS from the water supply, decreasing reliance on imported water, making community summits for citizen participation free to attend, and sharing projects and meeting results consistently on social media to increase transparency. She is near the completion of a certificate in water systems technology from the College of the Canyons and plans to apply her education directly if elected to office.

    Kathye Armitage boasts endorsements from the Stonewall Democratic Club, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the Sierra Club. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Armitage is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Water District
    Last updated: 2020-10-15

Three Valleys Municipal Water District

Division 6

  • Elect Three Valleys Municipal Water District Board Member Danielle Soto to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Three Valleys Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Los Angeles County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services across 133 square miles in the Pomona, Walnut, and eastern San Gabriel Valleys. Three Valleys directors represent each of the District's seven divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    The District’s Division 6 contains North Pomona, portions of South Claremont, East San Dimas, and unincorporated Spadra.

    About the Candidate

    Danielle Soto, a former Pomona City Council member and employee of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, is a lifelong Pomona resident. Soto lists the following priorities for her district: to increase outreach and education regarding conservation, to increase the turf rebate program, and to diversify water sources by working with partners to develop National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit requirements that can help facilitate water reuse through stormwater capture. During her time on the city council, Soto installed a new water-treatment facility for perchlorate and founded/chaired the Environmental Stewardship Council Subcommittee.

    Due to her strong record as a city councilmember and related work on air quality, we regard Danielle Soto as the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Danielle Soto

    Submitted by deepthi on Thu, 10/15/2020 - 08:59

    Elect Three Valleys Municipal Water District Board Member Danielle Soto to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Three Valleys Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Los Angeles County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services across 133 square miles in the Pomona, Walnut, and eastern San Gabriel Valleys. Three Valleys directors represent each of the District's seven divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    The District’s Division 6 contains North Pomona, portions of South Claremont, East San Dimas, and unincorporated Spadra.

    About the Candidate

    Danielle Soto, a former Pomona City Council member and employee of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, is a lifelong Pomona resident. Soto lists the following priorities for her district: to increase outreach and education regarding conservation, to increase the turf rebate program, and to diversify water sources by working with partners to develop National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit requirements that can help facilitate water reuse through stormwater capture. During her time on the city council, Soto installed a new water-treatment facility for perchlorate and founded/chaired the Environmental Stewardship Council Subcommittee.

    Due to her strong record as a city councilmember and related work on air quality, we regard Danielle Soto as the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Water District
    Last updated: 2020-10-15

Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District

Division 2

  • Elect Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Board Member Bridget Prince to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Upper San Gabriel Valley board members represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Upper San Gabriel’s Division 2 includes all or parts of Arcadia, Rosemead, San Gabriel, South Pasadena, South San Gabriel, and Temple City.

    About the Candidate

    Bridget Prince, a retired finance and sales manager, has lived in San Gabriel for 35 years. She is a lifelong outdoor enthusiast and believes in a “science first” approach to the water district, promising to champion clean water filtering and sustainability, and to further transparency and inclusion. Michael Kadish, the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters board president, says, “Bridget Prince is the candidate we need to challenge the status quo and make sustainable water, recycling, and stormwater capture the top priority.”

    Bridget Prince boasts endorsements from the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the National Women’s Political Caucus. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Prince is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Bridget Prince

    Submitted by deepthi on Thu, 10/15/2020 - 09:06

    Elect Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Board Member Bridget Prince to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Upper San Gabriel Valley board members represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Upper San Gabriel’s Division 2 includes all or parts of Arcadia, Rosemead, San Gabriel, South Pasadena, South San Gabriel, and Temple City.

    About the Candidate

    Bridget Prince, a retired finance and sales manager, has lived in San Gabriel for 35 years. She is a lifelong outdoor enthusiast and believes in a “science first” approach to the water district, promising to champion clean water filtering and sustainability, and to further transparency and inclusion. Michael Kadish, the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters board president, says, “Bridget Prince is the candidate we need to challenge the status quo and make sustainable water, recycling, and stormwater capture the top priority.”

    Bridget Prince boasts endorsements from the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the National Women’s Political Caucus. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Prince is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-15

Division 4

  • Elect Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Board Member Katarina Garcia to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Upper San Gabriel Valley board members represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Upper San Gabriel’s Division 4 includes all or parts of Azusa, Baldwin Park, Covina, Glendora, Irwindale, and West Covina.

    About the Candidate

    Katarina Garcia, a high school science teacher, has lived in the San Gabriel Valley for over thirty years. While in college, she worked for the Global Institute of Sustainability (now the School of Sustainability), and her interest in water science was spurred when she witnessed a new type of pavement that allowed water to be absorbed back into the ground, allowing for the reclamation of stormwater and some wastewater. Garcia promises to focus on the following priorities for her district: to enhance transparency and fiscal accountability to ensure that contracts and funding are meant to keep water affordable, not spent on lucrative perks for directors; to advocate for recycled water projects throughout the valley; and to clean up local groundwater by supporting projects like the Safe, Clean Water program.

    Katarina Garcia boasts endorsements from the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the Sierra Club. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Garcia is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Katarina Garcia

    Submitted by deepthi on Thu, 10/15/2020 - 09:08

    Elect Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Board Member Katarina Garcia to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Santa Clara County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services. Upper San Gabriel Valley board members represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    Upper San Gabriel’s Division 4 includes all or parts of Azusa, Baldwin Park, Covina, Glendora, Irwindale, and West Covina.

    About the Candidate

    Katarina Garcia, a high school science teacher, has lived in the San Gabriel Valley for over thirty years. While in college, she worked for the Global Institute of Sustainability (now the School of Sustainability), and her interest in water science was spurred when she witnessed a new type of pavement that allowed water to be absorbed back into the ground, allowing for the reclamation of stormwater and some wastewater. Garcia promises to focus on the following priorities for her district: to enhance transparency and fiscal accountability to ensure that contracts and funding are meant to keep water affordable, not spent on lucrative perks for directors; to advocate for recycled water projects throughout the valley; and to clean up local groundwater by supporting projects like the Safe, Clean Water program.

    Katarina Garcia boasts endorsements from the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters, the Los Angeles County Democratic Party, and the Sierra Club. According to our analysis and that of our partners, Garcia is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-15

West Basin Municipal Water District

Division 3

  • Elect West Basin Municipal Water District Board Member Doug Solomon to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The West Basin Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Los Angeles County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services across 185 square miles in Los Angeles County and some unincorporated areas. West Basin directors represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    West’s Division 3 contains the cities of Gardena, Hawthorne, and Lawndale, as well as unincorporated areas of El Camino Village.

    About the Candidate

    Doug Solomon, a financial transparency activist, shares the following priorities for his district: to stop financially irresponsible and unneeded ocean water desalination that will raise water bills by 20 percent, to instead drive West Basin to run its Water Recycling Plant at full capacity, and to improve environmental justice and stop overcharging low-income residents. Solmon is endorsed by the Los Angeles County Democratic Party and Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters.

    According to our analysis and that of our partners, Doug Solomon is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Doug Solomon

    Submitted by deepthi on Thu, 10/15/2020 - 08:56

    Elect West Basin Municipal Water District Board Member Doug Solomon to promote safe, clean, and sustainable water access.

    About the Position

    The West Basin Municipal Water District is one of the largest public agencies in Los Angeles County, providing water, wastewater (sewer), and recycled water services across 185 square miles in Los Angeles County and some unincorporated areas. West Basin directors represent each of the District's five divisions and are elected in the November general election in even-numbered years.

    About the Division

    West’s Division 3 contains the cities of Gardena, Hawthorne, and Lawndale, as well as unincorporated areas of El Camino Village.

    About the Candidate

    Doug Solomon, a financial transparency activist, shares the following priorities for his district: to stop financially irresponsible and unneeded ocean water desalination that will raise water bills by 20 percent, to instead drive West Basin to run its Water Recycling Plant at full capacity, and to improve environmental justice and stop overcharging low-income residents. Solmon is endorsed by the Los Angeles County Democratic Party and Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters.

    According to our analysis and that of our partners, Doug Solomon is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Water District
    Last updated: 2020-10-15

Los Angeles Unified School District

Depending on where you live, you may have the below races on your ballot.

Los Angeles Unified School District, Board Member, District #3

  • Elect Scott Mark Schmerelson to keep Los Angeles on the right track. 

    About the Position

    Los Angeles Unified School District contains 1,177 schools, and serves over 646,000 students annually. Members of the Los Angeles Board of Education are elected by district, every four years. 

    About the District

    Los Angeles Unified School District is the largest public school district in California,  and the second largest in the nation. The district oversees a budget of $8.4 billion. The district is very diverse, composed primarily of Latinx students (73.4 percent), with African American students (10 percent) composing the second-largest group of students.

    About the Candidate

    Scott Mark Schmerelson, a current LAUSD board member representing District 3, is from Los Angeles, California. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue advocating for the future of LAUSD’s educational system, and making a difference for the children and communities within his district. 

    Schmerelson’s priorities for District 3 schools include improving funding, classroom safety, parent participation, and environmental justice. Schmerelson has committed to fighting for adequate funding for Los Angeles’s public schools to ensure that education is being prioritized at the same level as other states. His campaign also prioritizes advocating for classroom safety by promoting gun safety awareness and instituting annual safety procedures. In addition to classroom safety, Schmerelson’s campaign emphasizes the importance of transitioning to renewable energy. He is committed to reducing waste within schools, and closing nearby gas facilities to reduce students’ exposure to pollution. Schmerelson has also demonstrated an awareness of the need for parent participation, and plans to eliminate barriers that create difficulties for parent volunteers. Schmerelson's campaign is committed to increasing the number of library aides, and establishing early interventions and screenings for students with dyslexia. 

    Prior to his role on the Los Angeles Board of Education, Scott Schmerelson served as an educator and administrator for over 40 years. He has experience working in the classroom as a high school teacher, as well as in administration through his roles as middle school counselor, assistant principal, and principal. During his term as principal, Schmerelson improved test scores, infrastructure, and morale. His experience working within the Los Angeles school system provided him with the knowledge and passion he has translated into his work as a member of the Board of Education. 

    Scott Schmerelson is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. These endorsements include Planned Parenthood, Sierra Club, and ACCE Action, and multiple unions, including SEIU Local 99. Schmerelson is also endorsed by the Los Angeles School Police Department, which is of particular concern, considering the rise of police violence within Los Angeles schools. 

    According to our analysis, despite our concerns about Scott Schmerelson’s police support, he remains the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.
     

    Last updated: 2020-10-17

Los Angeles Unified School District, Board Member, District #7

  • Elect Patricia Castellanos to keep Los Angeles on the right track. 

    About the Position

    Los Angeles Unified School District contains 1,177 schools, and serves over 646,000 students annually. Members of the Los Angeles Board of Education are elected by district, every four years.  \

    About the District

    Los Angeles Unified School District is the largest public school district in California,  and the second largest in the nation. The district oversees a budget of $8.4 billion. The district is very diverse, composed primarily of Latinx students (73.4 percent), with African American students (10 percent) composing the second-largest group of students.

    About the Candidate

    Patricia Castellanos is a workforce and economic development deputy for L.A. County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, and is a lifelong resident of LAUSD District 7. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to protect and strengthen local public schools, protect students from environmental pollution, and improve funding and quality of LAUSD education. 

    Castellanos’s priorities for LAUSD District 7 include improving classroom safety, quality, investment, and student support. As a parent supporting her own child with distance learning, she is committed to prioritizing COVID-19 relief and safe recovery for Los Angeles schools. Castellanos also understands the need to improve the quality of education within classrooms, and will fight to decrease class sizes, and increase the number of mental health and special education services and programs. Castellanos is also committed to finding revenue to reinvest funding into public education. 

    Patricia Castellanos is a longtime community organizer, with over 20 years of experience championing issues related to education. She has worked as director of Policy Training and Education at Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education and now serves as the workforce and economic development deputy for L.A. County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl. Through her positions, Castellanos has created opportunities for vulnerable, young and low-income populations. She has advocated for communities facing issues of homelessness and juvenile criminalization, and worked with L.A. County departments to ensure COVID-19 protections for small businesses and workers. Above all, Castellanos has demonstrated an awareness and commitment to address issues facing communities within District 7. She has experience organizing to address the historic disinvestment of Black and brown communities in South L.A. Her advocacy is fueled by her experience as a daughter of immigrant workers and mother of a child attending public schools in LAUSD District 7. 

    Castellanos is endorsed by numerous Democratic Party, teacher, labor, women's rights, and grassroots organizations. These include United Teachers Los Angeles, United Farm Workers, Sierra Club, ACCE Action, and Planned Parenthood--just to name a few. Castellanos has also received endorsements from a number of notable individuals, including U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, LAUSD Board President Dr. Richard Vladovi, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and civil rights and labor leader Dolores Huerta. 

    According to our analysis, Patricia Castellanos is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Elect Patricia Castellanos to keep Los Angeles on the right track.  Patricia Castellanos is a Workforce and Economic Development Deputy for LA County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, and is a lifelong resident of LAUSD District 7. According to campaign materials, she is running for election to protect and strengthen local public schools, protect students from environmental pollution, and improve funding and quality of LAUSD education. 
    Last updated: 2020-10-17

State Senate

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Senate races on your ballot.

State Senator, 21st District

Member of the State Senate

  • Elect Kipp Mueller to push SD-21 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating legislation that addresses issues within their district, as well as voting and debating on preexisting laws. The California State Senate has 40 congressional districts. Each represents a population of about 930,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Senate for a four-year term. Every two years, half of the Senate's 40 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to two four-year terms (eight years) in the Senate. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 29 seats in the California State Senate, while Republicans hold 11 seats.

    About the District

    California's 21st Senate District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. It includes the cities of Lancaster, Palmdale, Victorville, and Santa Clarita. Republicans typically hold this district. The most recent election results show SD-21 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Mueller trailed Republican incumbent Representative Scott Wilk by a margin of 34.3 percent. Mueller’s campaign has not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, but has not received such funds. Mueller has raised $314,230.02, mostly from individual donors. Wilk’s campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, has accepted funds from all three groups, and has raised more than three times as much as Mueller, bringing in $1,094,245. Wilk has received donations from very few individuals and is almost entirely funded by special interests, including Philip Morris, Anheuser-Busch Co., Pepsi Co., and defense technology company Northrup Grumman.

    About the Candidate

    Kipp Mueller is from Sacramento and moved to Santa Clarita, CA, in 2019. According to campaign materials, he is running for State Senate to represent the needs of the working- and middle-class families over special interests.

    Mueller is a workers’ rights and immigration attorney, representing workers and unions in legal disputes with large corporations, which he does because of his commitment to putting real people over corporations. In this role, Mueller has successfully represented union workers who have experienced fatal work accidents, and worked as a pro bono asylum attorney at an ICE detention center in Adelanto.

    According to recent election results, this is a tough race for Democrats. Mueller is the best progressive choice because of his track record of defending workers’ rights, and his commitment to defending our values and fighting for a better future.

    Mueller is endorsed by a strong majority of local progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Kipp Mueller is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Kipp Mueller

    Elect Kipp Mueller to push SD-21 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol.

    Last updated: 2020-10-20

State Senator, 23rd District

Member of the State Senate

  • Elect Abigail Medina to push SD-23 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating legislation that addresses issues within their district, as well as voting and debating on preexisting laws. The California State Senate has 40 congressional districts. Each represents a population of about 930,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Senate for a four-year term. Every two years, half of the Senate's 40 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to two four-year terms (eight years) in the Senate. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 29 seats in the California State Senate, while Republicans hold 11 seats.

    About the District

    California's 23rd Senate District includes parts of San Bernardino, Riverside, and Los Angeles Counties. Republicans typically hold this district. The most recent election results show SD-23 voted for Donald Trump for president in 2016 and John H. Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democratic challenger Abigail Medina led Republican challenger Rosilicie Ochoa Bogh by a margin of 3.3 percent. Medina’s campaign has pledged not to accept any fossil fuel or police money. Bogh’s campaign has not committed to any such pledges and is backed by Big Energy donors Marathon Petroleum and Edison International.

    About the Candidate

    Abigail Medina is from Torrance, CA, and moved to San Bernardino City, CA. According to campaign materials, she is running for office to advocate for environmental protections, public health, affordable housing, and increasing access to public college.

    Abigail Medina is a member of the San Bernardino City Unified School District board, serving as the lead on budgeting and strategic planning. Under her leadership, high school graduation rates have exceeded state and county standards for the first time in over 40 years. Additionally, Medina has fought for LGBTQIA+ rights as the executive director of Inland Region Equality Network, and she served as a board member for the Center for Community Action and Environmental Justice. As a youth, Medina spent time in the foster-care system and worked as a fruit picker, experiences that informed her lifelong commitment to social services.

    Abigail Medina is endorsed by a strong majority of local progressive groups in the district. She has a detailed record of promoting progressive causes in her work and,  according to our analysis, is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    About Courage California’s Endorsement

    After a comprehensive interview with Abigail Medina, we have determined that she is committed to education, criminal justice reform, environmental justice, racial equity and justice, and immigrant rights. Her experience with the SBCUSD and work as the Executive Director for IREN will bring fresh and new perspectives to the legislature on LGBTQIA+ issues. One of the first policies she would champion as a state legislator in the 2021 session is health care for all, including undocumented people. We are confident that she will co-govern in the interests of all Californians. Courage California is proud to endorse Abigail Medina for SD-23.


     

    Abigail Medina

    Elect Abigail Medina to push SD-23 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol.

    Last updated: 2020-10-30

State Senator, 25th District

Member of the State Senate

  • Re-elect State Senate Representative Portantino to keep SD-25 on the right track. 

    About the Position
    State senators represent and advocate the needs of their district at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating legislation that addresses issues within their district, as well as voting and debating on preexisting laws.

    The California State Senate has 40 congressional districts. Each represents a population of about 930,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Senate for a four-year term. Every two years, half of the Senate’s 40 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to two four-year terms (eight years) in the Senate. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 29 seats in the California State Senate, while Republicans hold 11 seats.

    About the District
    California’s 25th Senate District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Recent federal and state election results show that SD-25 voted 63 percent for both Hillary Clinton and Gavin Newsom in 2016 and 2018, respectively. 

    About the Race
    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Representative Anthony Portantino led Republican challenger Kathleen Hazelton by a margin of 98.6 percent. Sen. Portantino’s campaign has raised $305,000 and has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, police, or fossil fuel money. Hazelton’s campaign has not filed any fundraising receipts with the FEC, and has not committed to any funding pledges. Hazelton has made five personal contributions to Donald Trump’s re-election campaign this year. 

    About the Candidate
    Rep. Portantino, a former mayor and Assemblymember, lives in the San Gabriel Valley. According to campaign materials, Rep. Portantino is running for re-election to continue to advocate for the foothills community and represent the needs of families in the State Legislature. 

    Sen. Portantino’s priorities for SD-25 this year include education improvements, policies for drinking-water testing, and gun safety guidelines. He sits on five committees: Appropriations (currently as chair), Banking and Finance, Governmental Organization, Insurance, and Joint Legislative Budget. Sen. Portantino has sponsored 15 bills about allowances for teacher and student absences for mental-health care and natural disasters, special education and school accountability, the testing of drinking water, and the tightening of gun safety guidelines. He scores a lifetime 80 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, it’s been determined that Senator Portantino has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Sen. Portantino has not supported repealing sentencing enhancements for individuals with prior offenses, placing limits on debt collectors, or expanding the construction of Affordable Dwelling Units on a single property.

    Prior to his election to the State Senate, Sen. Portantino served on the La Cañada Flintridge City Council, as mayor of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy Advisory Committee, and as president of the League of California Cities Mayors and Council Members Department. He is a longtime supporter of public education, transparent government, and safeguarding human and civil rights. 

    Rep. Portantino is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Rep. Portantino is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Anthony Portantino

    Re-elect State Senate Representative Portantino to keep SD-25 on the right track. 

    About the Position

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Senator, 27th District

Member of the State Senate

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Senate Representative Henry Stern to keep SD-27 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating legislation that addresses issues within their district, as well as voting and debating on preexisting laws. The California State Senate has 40 congressional districts. Each represents a population of about 930,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Senate for a four-year term. Every two years, half of the Senate's 40 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to two four-year terms (eight years) in the Senate. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 29 seats in the California State Senate, while Republicans hold 11 seats.

    About the District

    California's 27th Senate District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show SD-27 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Henry Stern led Republican challenger Houman Salem by a margin of 27.6 percent. Stern’s campaign has raised $1,114,716 and has pledged to accept no money from the fossil fuel industry. Salem’s campaign has raised $19,080 and has not committed to any such pledges.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Henry Stern, an environmental attorney and community activist, is from Malibu, CA. According to campaign materials, Rep. Stern is running for re-election to promote renewable-energy technology, end trophy hunting, and divert funds toward backup power and firefighting resources.

    Sen. Stern’s priorities for SD-27 this year include expanding official state recognition of the climate-change crisis, further protecting our endangered species, and building microgrids to reduce blackouts. He currently sits on eight committees: the Natural Resources and Water Committee (chair); Climate Change Policies Committee (vice chair); Arts Committee; Budget and Fiscal Review Committee; Energy, Utilities and Communications Committee; Environmental Quality Committee; Elections and Constitutional Amendments Committee; and Judiciary Committee. Sen. Stern has sponsored 141 bills this year about such topics as gun violence prevention, education finance, fire safety, and exempting feminine hygiene products from taxation, of which over 10 percent have successfully passed. He scores a Lifetime 80 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Senator Stern has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Sen. Stern has not supported expanding Medi-Cal coverage to noncitizens or banning the use of biometric surveillance and facial-recognition technology from use in police body cameras.

    Prior to his election to the State Senate, Sen. Henry Stern worked as an environmental lawyer, counseled Congressman Henry Waxman on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and taught civics in local schools. He is a longtime supporter of environmental conservation and animal rights.

    Rep. Henry Stern is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. In his previous campaign, he was endorsed by the Association of Los Angeles County Sheriffs and California Association of Highway Patrolmen. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Houman Salem’s potential policies greatly outweighs Rep. Stern’s occasionally moderate voting record. According to our analysis, Rep. Henry Stern is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Henry Stern

    Re-elect State Senate Representative Henry Stern to keep SD-27 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Senator, 29th District

Member of the State Senate

  • Democrat
  • Elect Josh Newman to push SD-29 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating legislation that addresses issues within their district, as well as voting and debating on preexisting laws. The California State Senate has 40 congressional districts. Each represents a population of about 930,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Senate for a four-year term. Every two years, half of the Senate's 40 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to two four-year terms (eight years) in the Senate. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 29 seats in the California State Senate, while Republicans hold 11 seats.

    About the District

    California's 29th Senate District includes parts of Orange, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles Counties. Republicans held this district from 1992 to 2016, when Josh Newman won and flipped SD-29 from red to blue. The most recent election results show SD-29 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Josh Newman trailed Republican incumbent Ling Ling Chang by a margin of 13.9 percent. Newman’s campaign has pledged not to accept money from the fossil fuel industry. Rep. Chang’s campaign has not committed to any such pledges and is backed by Pacific Gas and Electric, Chevron, and Phillips 66. Furthermore, Rep. Chang took office in 2018 only after spending hundreds of thousands of her own dollars on a campaign to recall Josh Newman after he defeated her in 2016. Republican Councilmember Carl DeMaio said Josh Newman was targeted due to his narrow margin of victory.

    About the Candidate

    Josh Newman currently resides in Fullerton, CA, and, according to campaign materials, is running for election to strengthen veterans’ services, promote mental-health care, and ensure transparency in state-level politics.

    Before running for office, Josh Newman founded and ran ArmedForce2Workforce, an organization that aims to integrate combat veterans back into their Southern California homes and workplaces. He is the former vice chair of the California Democratic Party Veterans Caucus and has been a longtime supporter of public education and health care, infrastructure improvement, and renewable energy.

    Josh Newman is endorsed by a strong majority of local progressive groups in the district. The threat of Republican opponent and strong Trump supporter Ling Ling Chang’s potential policies greatly outweighs Newman’s moderate record. According to our analysis, Josh Newman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Josh Newman

    Elect Josh Newman to push SD-29 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Senator, 33rd District

Member of the State Senate

  • Re-elect State Senate Representative Lena Gonzalez to keep SD-33 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating legislation that addresses issues within their district, as well as voting and debating on preexisting laws. The California State Senate has 40 congressional districts. Each represents a population of about 930,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Senate for a four-year term. Every two years, half of the Senate's 40 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to two four-year terms (eight years) in the Senate. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 29 seats in the California State Senate, while Republicans hold 11 seats.

    About the District

    California's 33rd Senate District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Notable cities within the district include the Los Angeles County cities and communities of Bell Gardens, Vernon, and most of Long Beach. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show SD-33 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018 by large margins.

    About the Race

    In March 3 primary election, Democrat incumbent Representative Gonzalez led Democrat challenger Elizabeth Castillo by a margin of 99.6 percent. Gonzalez’s campaign has raised $312,573. Gonzalez’s campaign has signed pledges to refuse fossil fuel money and police money. After doing so, she returned all fossil fuel money that had been donated to her campaign in 2019 and 2020 and, at the request of #nocopmoneyca, has donated all cop money she received during the special election in 2019 to community groups like Black Lives Matter. The opposing candidate Castillo has pledged to refusing fossil fuel money but has not pledged to refuse police money. Because her campaign has not made any filings available through Cal-Access on the CA Secretary of State's website, we are unable to verify whether her campaign's pledges are reflected in the contributions. 

    About the Candidate

    Lena Gonzalez is a current state senator residing in Long Beach. She was first elected to her post in a 2019 special election to succeed Ricardo Lara, who left after being elected state Insurance Commissioner. According to campaign materials, Sen. Gonzalez is running for re-election to protect the environment, provide quality education and economic opportunity, safe neighborhoods, and affordable health care within the district. 

    As state senator, Gonzalez has prioritized expanding access to education and more equitable hiring practices. Legislation of note while in office includes SB1255, which she authored and passed, which ensures that Californians living with HIV receive life & disability insurance.

    Prior to her election to the State Senate, Sen. Gonzalez served as a councilmember for the Long Beach City Council. Gonzalez currently sits on the Senate Health Committee, Senate Judiciary Committee and the Joint Legislative Audit Committee. In 2019, as a state senator, Gonzalez scored 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records showing that she consistently votes against corporate influences and stands up for her constituents.

    Sen. Gonzalez has proven her community-driven leadership and voice for progress in the city of Long Beach by endorsing and supporting two progressive women of color, Tunua Thrash-Ntuk and Suely Saro, challenging two moderate City Council incumbents in 2020. 

    Gonzalez is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including the Stonewall Democratic Club and LEAP Forward. Other key endorsements include United Auto Workers, the California Teachers Association, and the National Union of Healthcare Workers. Based on our analysis, Senator Gonzalez is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Misinformation
    • Typically, we do not talk about Independent Expenditure campaigns in support or in opposition to candidates in our analysis of their campaign financing. This is because candidates have no control over this type of outside spending. However, in this case, other sources have pointed to outside spending into an Independent Expenditure supporting Gonzalez’s candidacy from a SuperPAC funded by major oil companies. A few important details to note 1) This funding was related to Gonzalez’s special election campaign in 2019 when she first won this seat and has no relationship to her current campaign and 2) Gonzalez worked directly with groups including the California League of Conservation Voters to publicly reject that outside spending when it happened. Since her election, her voting record shows no evidence of influence by the oil industry and she has returned every attempted direct donation from the fossil fuel industry to her campaign. 

     

    Lena Gonzalez

    Re-elect State Senate Representative Lena Gonzalez to keep SD-33 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Senator, 35th District

Member of the State Senate

  • Re-elect State Senate Representative Steven Bradford to keep SD-35 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol. They are responsible for creating legislation that addresses issues within their district, as well as voting and debating on preexisting laws. The California State Senate has 40 congressional districts. Each represents a population of about 930,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Senate for a four-year term. Every two years, half of the Senate's 40 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to two four-year terms (eight years) in the Senate. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 29 seats in the California State Senate, while Republicans hold 11 seats.

    About the District

    California's 35th Senate District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Inglewood, Torrance, and Long Beach. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show SD-35 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Bradford led American Independent Party challenger Anthony Perry by a margin of 51.4 percent. Bradford’s campaign has raised $1,162,607.30. Bradford has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and has accepted money from corporate and fossil fuel groups. No FEC filings have been made about opponent Perry’s campaign’s funding.

    About the Candidate

    State Senator Steven Bradford is from Gardena, CA. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2017. According to campaign materials, he is running for State Senate to advance policies to help local working-class families.

    As a state senator, Bradford has authored numerous pieces of legislation that promote a clean environment, climate justice, and civil rights, and enhance public safety. Bradford currently serves as chair of the Labor and Industrial Relations Committee and sits on the Public Safety, Governmental Organization, Appropriations Committees, as well as the Energy, Utilities and Communications Committee. Prior to his election to the State Senate, he served in the Gardena City Council and the State Assembly.
     
    Sen. Bradford’s priorities for SD-35 this year include health care, jobs, public safety, and economic revitalization. Sen. Bradford has sponsored and co-sponsored three bills about social justice and equitable housing this year. He scores 86 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Senator Bradford has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Sen. Bradford has not supported key legislation that provides environmental protections in the district.

    Prior to his election to the State Senate, Sen. Bradford was a public affairs manager for Southern California Edison, district director for the late Congresswoman Juanita Millender-McDonald, and program director for the LA Conservation Corps.

    Rep. Bradford is endorsed by many progressive and moderate groups in the district. According to our analysis, Rep. Bradford is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Steven Bradford

    Re-elect State Senate Representative Steven Bradford to keep SD-35 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State senators represent and advocate for the needs of their district at the California State Capitol.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly

Depending on where you live, you may have one of the below State Assembly races on your ballot.

State Assembly, 36th District

Member of the State Assembly

No Recommendation

Based on our analysis, there is no progressive candidate to recommend for your vote in this race.

About the Position

State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

About the District

California's 36th Assembly District includes parts of Kern, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino Counties. Democrats held this district before 2014, when Tom Lackey first won the seat and flipped AD-36 from blue to red. The most recent election results show 49.9 percent of AD-36 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 51.2 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

About the Race

In the primary, Democrat challenger Steve Fox trailed Republican incumbent Representative Tom Lackey by a margin of 35.7 percent. Neither candidate has pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money. Fox’s campaign has raised $59,603.81, entirely from individual donors. Lackey’s campaign has raised $546,214.02 and is backed by corporate PACs, fossil fuel, and police money.

About the Candidate

Steve Fox is the challenger and the former assemblymember for this district from 2012–2014. While Fox has co-authored legislation that expanded housing for veterans, he has also been absent for, or voted against, key progressive legislation, such as for environmental protections and raising the minimum wage. Steve Fox has also been accused of sexual misconduct during his time as assemblymember. Based on his track record, Fox is likely to provide no progressive leadership in office.

Keep reading for progressive recommendations in other key races and on ballot measures where your vote can make a critical difference.

 


State Assembly, 38th District

Member of the State Assembly

No Recommendation

Based on our analysis, there is no progressive candidate to recommend for your vote in this race.

About the Position

State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

About the District

California's 35th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Barbara County and all of San Luis Obispo County. The district has been held by Republicans and Democrats over the years, but has been red since 2012. Most recent election results show AD-35 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Cox for governor in 2018.

About the Race

In the primary, Republican challenger Suzette Martinez Valladares led Republican challenger Lucie Lapointe Volotzky by a margin of 14.2 percent. Neither campaign has pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money. Valladares’s campaign has raised $237,213.00, including contributions from corporate and police interest groups. Volotzky has raised much less, with $7,084.00, mostly from individuals.

About the Candidates

Neither candidate has served in office. Valladares’s priorities for this year, other than espousing broadly Republican values, are difficult to ascertain, given the lack of a developed platform. Due to a lack of campaign materials, it is also not possible to ascertain Volotzky’s priorities for the district. Based on their campaign materials, both candidates are likely to provide no progressive leadership in office.

Keep reading for progressive recommendations in other key races and on ballot measures where your vote can make a critical difference.

 


State Assembly, 39th District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Luz Maria Rivas to keep AD-39 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 39th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Mission Hills, Sunland-Tujunga, and Sylmar. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-39 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Rivas led Republican challenger Ricardo Benitez by a margin of 55.6 percent. Rivas’s campaign has raised $333,608.51, with labor organizations comprising much of her donor base. Rivas is not funded by fossil fuel money, but she has accepted police and corporate money. Benitez’s campaign has raised $1,454.59 from just two individuals and a Republican organization, and has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Rivas is from Northeast San Fernando Valley, and returned to Los Angeles after completing her master’s in education at Harvard University. She is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2018. According to campaign materials, Rep. Rivas is running for re-election to advocate for economic empowerment, independence, and self-efficacy.

    In the Assembly, Rivas has worked on legislation to address California’s homeless student crisis, to ensure that post-secondary schools cannot refuse transcripts because of a student’s debt, and has authored the Share Our Values Film Tax, which would give tax credits to companies that decide to film in California instead of a state that have enacted anti-abortion legislation.

    Prior to serving in the Assembly, Assemblymember Rivas was an electrical engineer and an educator, and strongly believes that an education in a STEM field can create opportunity and empower all people, particularly women and girls. She founded a nonprofit, DIY Girls, which teaches engineering and design skills, and was also appointed to the Los Angeles Board of Public Works in 2016.

    Rivas has a lifetime score of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on this analysis, Assemblymember Rivas has consistently shown great courage and has advocated for the needs of constituents while facing down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. She has demonstrated her progressive values in her commitment to equity, education, and supporting marginalized populations in her community.

    Assemblymember Rivas is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also endorsed by two police groups. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Rivas is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Luz Maria Rivas

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Luz Maria Rivas to keep AD-39 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 39th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Mission Hills, Sunland-Tujunga, and Sylmar. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-39 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Rivas led Republican challenger Ricardo Benitez by a margin of 55.6 percent. Rivas’s campaign has raised $333,608.51, with labor organizations comprising much of her donor base. Rivas is not funded by fossil fuel money, but she has accepted police and corporate money. Benitez’s campaign has raised $1,454.59 from just two individuals and a Republican organization, and has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Rivas is from Northeast San Fernando Valley, and returned to Los Angeles after completing her master’s in education at Harvard University. She is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2018. According to campaign materials, Rep. Rivas is running for re-election to advocate for economic empowerment, independence, and self-efficacy.

    In the Assembly, Rivas has worked on legislation to address California’s homeless student crisis, to ensure that post-secondary schools cannot refuse transcripts because of a student’s debt, and has authored the Share Our Values Film Tax, which would give tax credits to companies that decide to film in California instead of a state that have enacted anti-abortion legislation.

    Prior to serving in the Assembly, Assemblymember Rivas was an electrical engineer and an educator, and strongly believes that an education in a STEM field can create opportunity and empower all people, particularly women and girls. She founded a nonprofit, DIY Girls, which teaches engineering and design skills, and was also appointed to the Los Angeles Board of Public Works in 2016.

    Rivas has a lifetime score of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on this analysis, Assemblymember Rivas has consistently shown great courage and has advocated for the needs of constituents while facing down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. She has demonstrated her progressive values in her commitment to equity, education, and supporting marginalized populations in her community.

    Assemblymember Rivas is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also endorsed by two police groups. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Rivas is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 41st District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Chris Holden to keep AD-41 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 41st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Democrats typically hold this district, and Holden has held this seat since 2012. The most recent election results show AD-41 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Holden led Republican challenger Robin Hvidston by a margin of 37.4 percent. Holden’s campaign has raised $490,608.45. His campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and he has received funding from all three types of groups. Hvidston’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Chris Holden is a lifelong resident of Pasadena. He is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 41st District in the State Assembly since 2012. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to find solutions that create and protect jobs, preserve vital services, and strengthen the economic vitality of the San Gabriel Valley.

    As an assemblymember, Holden has authored and led the passage of several bills to support small businesses and innovation, save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Holden currently chairs the Assembly Committee on Utilities and Energy.

    Assemblymember Holden’s priorities for AD-41 this year include creating jobs and a strong economy, investing in quality education for children, improving transportation and infrastructure, and preserving natural resources. Holden scores a lifetime 93 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Holden has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Holden has supported legislation to eliminate oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Chris Holden served as a Pasadena City Councilmember and then as Pasadena City mayor. He has served Pasadena as councilmember the second-longest. Holden is a graduate of Pasadena High School and San Diego State University. In this position, Holden authored and pushed the passage of several bills, including legislation that expanded California’s small-business loan-guarantee program and reduced fees at UCs and CSUs by up to 40 percent for middle-class families.

    Assemblymember Holden is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. The threat of anti-immigrant Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Hvidston’s potential policies greatly outweighs Holden’s less-than-ideal campaign financing. According to our analysis, Rep. Holden is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Chris Holden

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Chris Holden to keep AD-41 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 41st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Democrats typically hold this district, and Holden has held this seat since 2012. The most recent election results show AD-41 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Holden led Republican challenger Robin Hvidston by a margin of 37.4 percent. Holden’s campaign has raised $490,608.45. His campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and he has received funding from all three types of groups. Hvidston’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Chris Holden is a lifelong resident of Pasadena. He is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 41st District in the State Assembly since 2012. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to find solutions that create and protect jobs, preserve vital services, and strengthen the economic vitality of the San Gabriel Valley.

    As an assemblymember, Holden has authored and led the passage of several bills to support small businesses and innovation, save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Holden currently chairs the Assembly Committee on Utilities and Energy.

    Assemblymember Holden’s priorities for AD-41 this year include creating jobs and a strong economy, investing in quality education for children, improving transportation and infrastructure, and preserving natural resources. Holden scores a lifetime 93 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Holden has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Holden has supported legislation to eliminate oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Chris Holden served as a Pasadena City Councilmember and then as Pasadena City mayor. He has served Pasadena as councilmember the second-longest. Holden is a graduate of Pasadena High School and San Diego State University. In this position, Holden authored and pushed the passage of several bills, including legislation that expanded California’s small-business loan-guarantee program and reduced fees at UCs and CSUs by up to 40 percent for middle-class families.

    Assemblymember Holden is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. The threat of anti-immigrant Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Hvidston’s potential policies greatly outweighs Holden’s less-than-ideal campaign financing. According to our analysis, Rep. Holden is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 43rd District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Laura Friedman to keep AD-43 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Glendale, Burbank, La Cañada Flintridge, and La Crescenta-Montrose. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-43 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Laura Friedman led Republican challenger Mike Graves by a margin of 54.9 percent. Friedman’s campaign has raised $408,291.69 and is not funded by fossil fuel money, although Sempra Energy, which is not on the No Fossil Fuel pledge list, thus technically not breaking her pledge, has contributed to her campaign. Friedman’s campaign has also accepted police and corporation money. No FEC filings have been made about opponent Graves’s campaign’s funding.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Laura Friedman is a longtime Glendale resident. She is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 43rd District in the State Assembly since 2016. According to campaign materials, she is running for re-election to continue her work to raise the minimum wage, protect the environment, and advocate for universal health care and affordable housing.

    As an assemblymember, Friedman has authored and led the passage of several bills related to small business and innovation, and has worked to save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Friedman currently serves as chair of the Assembly Committee on Natural Resources, which covers air quality, climate change, renewable energy, coastal protection, and other environmental issues. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she served seven years on the Glendale City Council, including a term as the mayor of Glendale.

    Assemblymember Friedman’s priorities for AD-43 this year include protecting vulnerable Californians, advocating for better and more efficient mass transit options, and combating the climate crisis. She has a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation that would increase oversight of telecommunications companies.

    During her first term as assemblymember, Friedman authored a package of bills to institute landmark water-efficiency standards, strengthen environmental sustainability, and expand access to higher education, health care, and transportation alternatives. She is a longtime supporter of environmental causes.

    Assemblymember Friedman is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Friedman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Laura Friedman

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Laura Friedman to keep AD-43 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Glendale, Burbank, La Cañada Flintridge, and La Crescenta-Montrose. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-43 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Laura Friedman led Republican challenger Mike Graves by a margin of 54.9 percent. Friedman’s campaign has raised $408,291.69 and is not funded by fossil fuel money, although Sempra Energy, which is not on the No Fossil Fuel pledge list, thus technically not breaking her pledge, has contributed to her campaign. Friedman’s campaign has also accepted police and corporation money. No FEC filings have been made about opponent Graves’s campaign’s funding.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Laura Friedman is a longtime Glendale resident. She is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 43rd District in the State Assembly since 2016. According to campaign materials, she is running for re-election to continue her work to raise the minimum wage, protect the environment, and advocate for universal health care and affordable housing.

    As an assemblymember, Friedman has authored and led the passage of several bills related to small business and innovation, and has worked to save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Friedman currently serves as chair of the Assembly Committee on Natural Resources, which covers air quality, climate change, renewable energy, coastal protection, and other environmental issues. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she served seven years on the Glendale City Council, including a term as the mayor of Glendale.

    Assemblymember Friedman’s priorities for AD-43 this year include protecting vulnerable Californians, advocating for better and more efficient mass transit options, and combating the climate crisis. She has a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation that would increase oversight of telecommunications companies.

    During her first term as assemblymember, Friedman authored a package of bills to institute landmark water-efficiency standards, strengthen environmental sustainability, and expand access to higher education, health care, and transportation alternatives. She is a longtime supporter of environmental causes.

    Assemblymember Friedman is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Friedman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 44th District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-44 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Democrats typically hold this district, although a Republican held this seat from 2010 to 2014. The most recent election results show AD-44 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Irwin led Republican challenger Rob McCoy by a margin of 54.9 percent. Irwin’s campaign has raised $491,633.36. The campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and is funded by police and corporate money, including from Monsanto, Facebook, and Johnson & Johnson. McCoy’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin currently resides in Thousand Oaks, CA. She is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2014. According to campaign materials, she is running to keep her seat to continue to create jobs, ensure that her community is safe, and advocate for fiscally responsible governance.

    Assemblymember Irwin’s priorities for AD-44 this year include job creation. She has sponsored and co-sponsored two bills about gun violence prevention. Irwin scores a Lifetime Courage Score of 46 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Irwin has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has voted against key progressive bills on criminal-justice reform, labor rights, and increasing access to affordable housing.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Rep. Irwin served as mayor of Thousand Oaks. In her first term as assemblymember, she advanced legislation to increase funding for education and mental-health services, expand consumer protections, and address sexual harassment in the workplace. Irwin currently serves as chair of the Veterans’ Affairs Committee and the Cybersecurity Select Committee, and sits on three additional committees.

    Rep. Irwin is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also endorsed by the California Correctional Peace Officers Association. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter McCoy’s potential policies--especially as a pastor who made the news recently by defying a judge’s orders to stop in-person church services during the pandemic--greatly outweighs Irwin’s moderate voting record. According to our analysis, Rep. Irwin is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Jacqui Irwin

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin to keep AD-44 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 44th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Democrats typically hold this district, although a Republican held this seat from 2010 to 2014. The most recent election results show AD-44 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Irwin led Republican challenger Rob McCoy by a margin of 54.9 percent. Irwin’s campaign has raised $491,633.36. The campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and is funded by police and corporate money, including from Monsanto, Facebook, and Johnson & Johnson. McCoy’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin currently resides in Thousand Oaks, CA. She is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2014. According to campaign materials, she is running to keep her seat to continue to create jobs, ensure that her community is safe, and advocate for fiscally responsible governance.

    Assemblymember Irwin’s priorities for AD-44 this year include job creation. She has sponsored and co-sponsored two bills about gun violence prevention. Irwin scores a Lifetime Courage Score of 46 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Irwin has supported some progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has voted against key progressive bills on criminal-justice reform, labor rights, and increasing access to affordable housing.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Rep. Irwin served as mayor of Thousand Oaks. In her first term as assemblymember, she advanced legislation to increase funding for education and mental-health services, expand consumer protections, and address sexual harassment in the workplace. Irwin currently serves as chair of the Veterans’ Affairs Committee and the Cybersecurity Select Committee, and sits on three additional committees.

    Rep. Irwin is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also endorsed by the California Correctional Peace Officers Association. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter McCoy’s potential policies--especially as a pastor who made the news recently by defying a judge’s orders to stop in-person church services during the pandemic--greatly outweighs Irwin’s moderate voting record. According to our analysis, Rep. Irwin is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 45th District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel to keep AD-45 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 45th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 67.4 percent of AD-45 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 67.3 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Jesse Gabriel led Republican challenger Jeffi Girgenti by a margin of 97.6 percent. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $706,389.49. Gabriel has pledged to refuse fossil fuel money, but has yet to pledge to refuse corporate PAC and police money. Gabriel’s campaign is funded mostly by labor groups and individuals, but has also accepted money from corporations like Facebook, Comcast Corporation, and AT&T. Opponent Girgenti’s campaign has not made any campaign finance filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel grew up in the Oak Park community in Ventura County and currently lives in the San Fernando Valley. He is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 45th District in the State Assembly since 2018, where he was appointed by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendón to serve in the Assembly Leadership as assistant majority whip. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to advance the legislative priorities of the Democratic Caucus in the State Assembly.

    Assemblymember Gabriel is an advocate for stronger gun violence prevention legislation, protection against hate crimes, and bringing jobs and innovation to the San Fernando Valley. That said, he has voted against key progressive bills on such issues as criminal-justice reform and worker protections.

    Assemblymember Gabriel currently sits on six committees, including the Standing Committee on Housing and Community Development. Rep. Gabriel has sponsored a bill about gun control this year, which passed into law. He scores a lifetime score of 74 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he worked as a constitutional rights and general litigation attorney. In this role, he sued the Trump administration to protect Dreamers who were promised protection under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

    Rep. Gabriel is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Rep. Gabriel is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Jesse Gabriel

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel to keep AD-45 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 45th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 67.4 percent of AD-45 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 67.3 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Jesse Gabriel led Republican challenger Jeffi Girgenti by a margin of 97.6 percent. Gabriel’s campaign has raised $706,389.49. Gabriel has pledged to refuse fossil fuel money, but has yet to pledge to refuse corporate PAC and police money. Gabriel’s campaign is funded mostly by labor groups and individuals, but has also accepted money from corporations like Facebook, Comcast Corporation, and AT&T. Opponent Girgenti’s campaign has not made any campaign finance filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel grew up in the Oak Park community in Ventura County and currently lives in the San Fernando Valley. He is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 45th District in the State Assembly since 2018, where he was appointed by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendón to serve in the Assembly Leadership as assistant majority whip. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to advance the legislative priorities of the Democratic Caucus in the State Assembly.

    Assemblymember Gabriel is an advocate for stronger gun violence prevention legislation, protection against hate crimes, and bringing jobs and innovation to the San Fernando Valley. That said, he has voted against key progressive bills on such issues as criminal-justice reform and worker protections.

    Assemblymember Gabriel currently sits on six committees, including the Standing Committee on Housing and Community Development. Rep. Gabriel has sponsored a bill about gun control this year, which passed into law. He scores a lifetime score of 74 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he worked as a constitutional rights and general litigation attorney. In this role, he sued the Trump administration to protect Dreamers who were promised protection under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

    Rep. Gabriel is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Rep. Gabriel is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 46th District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Adrin Nazarian to keep AD-46 on the right track. 

    About the Position

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Democratic Incumbent Assemblymember Adrin Nazarian has held this office since he was elected in 2012. The most recent election results show 76.2 percent of AD-46 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and 78 percent of AD-46 voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Adrin Nazarian led Democratic challenger Lanira Murphy by a margin of 39.4 percent. Assemblymember Nazarian’s campaign has raised over $527,000 and is funded by fossil fuels, corporate PACs, and police money. Murphy’s campaign has received $1,376 in contributions and has committed to keeping corporate PAC money and police money out of her campaign. She has not signed the fossil fuel money pledge.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Nazarian was born in Iran and now lives in West Toluca Lake, CA. He previously served as Chief of Staff to former Assistant Majority Leader Paul Krekorian. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Nazarian is running for re-election to increase K–12 and higher learning aid, work with small businesses to keep film production jobs in the district, and improve transportation.

    Assemblymember Nazarian’s priorities for AD-46 this year include lowering insulin copays for diabetic Californians during the COVID-19 pandemic and divesting from Turkish bonds. He currently sits on five standing committees: Aging and Long-Term Care (as chair), Arts, Budget, Health, and Transportation. Assemblymember Nazarian has sponsored 55 bills about taxation, wellness programs, health care, and education this year, of which 10 have been successfully chaptered into law.

    His lifetime score is 86 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Nazarian has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assemblymember Nazarian has not supported SB 1 (strengthening California environmental standards to pre-Trump federal levels), SB 136 (repealing sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses), AB 1600 (expediting the process to obtain police misconduct records in a criminal trial), AB 290 (preventing dialysis companies from steering patients from Medi-Cal to boost corporate profits), SB 268 (offering voters more information on potentially progressive taxation measures), and AB 1279 (encouraging affordable housing production in “high-resource” areas that show patterns of exclusion). Additionally, Assemblymember Nazarian received a 100 percent score from the California Environmental Justice Alliance in 2019.

    Assemblymember Nazarian is endorsed by a majority of progressive groups such as California Democratic Party, Equality California, and California Teachers Association. He is also endorsed by California Statewide Law Enforcement Association and the Peace Officers Research Association. We were unable to find any endorsements for challenger Murphy. Despite his problematic endorsements by law enforcement and occasional moderate voting history on key progressive legislation, Assemblymember Nazarian’s base of support in the district makes him the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Adrin Nazarian

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Adrin Nazarian to keep AD-46 on the right track. 

    About the Position

    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California’s 46th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Democratic Incumbent Assemblymember Adrin Nazarian has held this office since he was elected in 2012. The most recent election results show 76.2 percent of AD-46 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and 78 percent of AD-46 voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Adrin Nazarian led Democratic challenger Lanira Murphy by a margin of 39.4 percent. Assemblymember Nazarian’s campaign has raised over $527,000 and is funded by fossil fuels, corporate PACs, and police money. Murphy’s campaign has received $1,376 in contributions and has committed to keeping corporate PAC money and police money out of her campaign. She has not signed the fossil fuel money pledge.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Nazarian was born in Iran and now lives in West Toluca Lake, CA. He previously served as Chief of Staff to former Assistant Majority Leader Paul Krekorian. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Nazarian is running for re-election to increase K–12 and higher learning aid, work with small businesses to keep film production jobs in the district, and improve transportation.

    Assemblymember Nazarian’s priorities for AD-46 this year include lowering insulin copays for diabetic Californians during the COVID-19 pandemic and divesting from Turkish bonds. He currently sits on five standing committees: Aging and Long-Term Care (as chair), Arts, Budget, Health, and Transportation. Assemblymember Nazarian has sponsored 55 bills about taxation, wellness programs, health care, and education this year, of which 10 have been successfully chaptered into law.

    His lifetime score is 86 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Nazarian has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Assemblymember Nazarian has not supported SB 1 (strengthening California environmental standards to pre-Trump federal levels), SB 136 (repealing sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses), AB 1600 (expediting the process to obtain police misconduct records in a criminal trial), AB 290 (preventing dialysis companies from steering patients from Medi-Cal to boost corporate profits), SB 268 (offering voters more information on potentially progressive taxation measures), and AB 1279 (encouraging affordable housing production in “high-resource” areas that show patterns of exclusion). Additionally, Assemblymember Nazarian received a 100 percent score from the California Environmental Justice Alliance in 2019.

    Assemblymember Nazarian is endorsed by a majority of progressive groups such as California Democratic Party, Equality California, and California Teachers Association. He is also endorsed by California Statewide Law Enforcement Association and the Peace Officers Research Association. We were unable to find any endorsements for challenger Murphy. Despite his problematic endorsements by law enforcement and occasional moderate voting history on key progressive legislation, Assemblymember Nazarian’s base of support in the district makes him the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 48th District

Member of the State Assembly

No Recommendation

Based on our analysis, there is no progressive candidate to recommend for your vote in this race.

About the Position

The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.  

About the District

California's 48th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-48 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

About the Race

Democratic incumbent Blanca Rubio is running unopposed for this seat. She has taken no pledges to turn down funding from the fossil fuel industry, law enforcement, or large corporate PACs. Her top donors are energy companies and law enforcement, including Chevron, Phillips 66, PG&E, the California Independent Petroleum Association, the Peace Officers Research Association of California, and the California Correctional Peace Officers Association.

About the Candidate

Rep. Blanca Rubio scores a lifetime 56 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Rubio abstained from voting on most bills during the 2019–2020 session and actively voted no on rent control, requiring just cause for evictions, sponsoring public banking, analyzing the economic impact of charter schools on local communities, and repealing sentence enhancements for repeat offenders.

Based on her voting record and financial ties, Rep. Blanca Rubio is unlikely to provide progressive leadership in office. Keep reading for progressive recommendations in other key races and on ballot measures where your vote can make a critical difference.


State Assembly, 49th District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Edwin Chau to keep AD-49 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 49th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-49 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Edwin Chau led Republican challenger Burton Brink by a margin of 27.4 percent. Chau’s campaign has raised $243,884 and has not committed to any campaign finance pledges. Brink’s campaign has raised $24,886 and received over 50 percent of those funds from the Los Angeles County Professional Peace Officers Association, Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Arcadia Police Officers Association.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Edwin Chau, a former lawyer and Montebello School Board member, is from Hong Kong and grew up in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Rep. Chau is running for re-election to continue his fight for internet privacy protections, improve the San Gabriel Valley’s groundwater sources, and address the affordable housing crisis.

    Rep. Edwin Chau’s accomplishments in AD-49 include increasing public school funding, lowering class sizes, passing extensive consumer privacy protections, and making drone surveillance an invasion of privacy. He currently sits on five committees: the Appropriations, Economic Development, Judiciary, Natural Resources, and Privacy and Consumer Protections Committees. Rep. Chau has sponsored 221 bills on such topics as worker compensation for those infected with COVID-19, regulating drone usage for package delivery, and cybersecurity analysis of public school districts this year, of which over 10 percent have successfully passed. He scores a lifetime 92 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Chau has supported nearly all progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Chau has not supported repealing sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses or preventing dialysis companies from redirecting their patients away from Medi-Cal.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Edwin Chau worked as a programmer for IBM, operated his own law office, and served on the Montebello Unified School District board for twelve years, acting as president three times. He has served as AD-49’s assemblymember since 2012 and is a longtime supporter of data security and privacy protections for everyday internet users.

    Rep. Edwin Chau is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. He has previously taken money from the California Statewide Law Enforcement Association and California Association of Highway Patrolmen. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Burton Brink’s potential policies greatly outweighs Rep. Chau’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Edwin Chau is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Edwin Chau

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Edwin Chau to keep AD-49 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 49th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-49 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Edwin Chau led Republican challenger Burton Brink by a margin of 27.4 percent. Chau’s campaign has raised $243,884 and has not committed to any campaign finance pledges. Brink’s campaign has raised $24,886 and received over 50 percent of those funds from the Los Angeles County Professional Peace Officers Association, Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and Arcadia Police Officers Association.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Edwin Chau, a former lawyer and Montebello School Board member, is from Hong Kong and grew up in Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Rep. Chau is running for re-election to continue his fight for internet privacy protections, improve the San Gabriel Valley’s groundwater sources, and address the affordable housing crisis.

    Rep. Edwin Chau’s accomplishments in AD-49 include increasing public school funding, lowering class sizes, passing extensive consumer privacy protections, and making drone surveillance an invasion of privacy. He currently sits on five committees: the Appropriations, Economic Development, Judiciary, Natural Resources, and Privacy and Consumer Protections Committees. Rep. Chau has sponsored 221 bills on such topics as worker compensation for those infected with COVID-19, regulating drone usage for package delivery, and cybersecurity analysis of public school districts this year, of which over 10 percent have successfully passed. He scores a lifetime 92 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Chau has supported nearly all progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Chau has not supported repealing sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses or preventing dialysis companies from redirecting their patients away from Medi-Cal.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Edwin Chau worked as a programmer for IBM, operated his own law office, and served on the Montebello Unified School District board for twelve years, acting as president three times. He has served as AD-49’s assemblymember since 2012 and is a longtime supporter of data security and privacy protections for everyday internet users.

    Rep. Edwin Chau is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. He has previously taken money from the California Statewide Law Enforcement Association and California Association of Highway Patrolmen. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Burton Brink’s potential policies greatly outweighs Rep. Chau’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Edwin Chau is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-22

State Assembly, 50th District

Member of the State Assembly

  • TEST 
    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Representative Richard Bloom led Democratic challenger Will Hess by a margin of 64.2 percent. Bloom’s campaign has raised $352,401, has committed to no campaign finance pledges, and has won four previous races. Hess’s campaign has not made a significant impact on the race and champions an alt-right platform.

    About the Candidate

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Richard Bloom to keep AD-50 on the right track. 

    About the Position
    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and one seat is currently vacant. 

    About the District
    California’s 50th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Most recent election results show AD-50 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race
    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Representative Richard Bloom led Democratic challenger Will Hess by a margin of 64.2 percent. Bloom’s campaign has raised $352,401, has committed to no campaign finance pledges, and has won four previous races. Hess’s campaign has not made a significant impact on the race and champions an alt-right platform.

    About the Candidate
    Rep. Richard Bloom, former mayor of Santa Monica and four-time State Assemblymember, was raised in Altadena and West Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Rep. Bloom is running for re-election to provide services for seniors and the disabled, end homelessness, and protect California’s environment.

    Rep. Richard Bloom’s priorities for AD-50 this year include fostering local economic development and improving public school funding. He currently sits on seven committees: Arts Committee, Legislative Budget Committee, Business and Professions Committee, Appropriations Committee, Budget Committee, Higher Education Committee, and Local Government Committee. Rep. Bloom has sponsored 283 bills on such topics as gun violence prevention, rent control, reducing the use of force by police, and microfiber pollution this year, of which over 10% have successfully passed. This is about average for an assemblymember's bill passage rate in 2019.

    He scores a lifetime 90 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Bloom has supported most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Bloom has not supported evaluating the economic impact of charter schools on local communities and standardizing out-of-pocket medical costs for emergency care.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Richard Bloom practiced family law for 30 years, assisting low-income clients at Levitt & Quinn Family Law Center and the homeless at PATH Partners. In 1999, he was first elected to the Santa Monica City Council, beginning a 21-year political career that includes his tenure as mayor of Santa Monica and as District 50’s State Assemblymember. A member of the California Coastal Commission, he is a longtime supporter of ending the captivity of marine animals for entertainment purposes and has passed such legislation into law.

    Rep. Richard Bloom is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. He is also funded by the Los Angeles Police Protective League, the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, and the California Association of Highway Patrolmen. However, the threat of alt-right-friendly challenger Will Hess’s potential policies greatly outweighs Bloom’s moderate voting record, campaign contributions from police unions, and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Richard Bloom is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.
     

    Richard Bloom

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Richard Bloom to keep AD-50 on the right track. 

    About the Position
    The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the state Senate or Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and one seat is currently vacant. 

    About the District
    California’s 50th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. Most recent election results show AD-50 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race
    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Representative Richard Bloom led Democratic challenger Will Hess by a margin of 64.2 percent. Bloom’s campaign has raised $352,401, has committed to no campaign finance pledges, and has won four previous races. Hess’s campaign has not made a significant impact on the race and champions an alt-right platform.

    About the Candidate
    Rep. Richard Bloom, former mayor of Santa Monica and four-time State Assemblymember, was raised in Altadena and West Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Rep. Bloom is running for re-election to provide services for seniors and the disabled, end homelessness, and protect California’s environment.

    Rep. Richard Bloom’s priorities for AD-50 this year include fostering local economic development and improving public school funding. He currently sits on seven committees: Arts Committee, Legislative Budget Committee, Business and Professions Committee, Appropriations Committee, Budget Committee, Higher Education Committee, and Local Government Committee. Rep. Bloom has sponsored 283 bills on such topics as gun violence prevention, rent control, reducing the use of force by police, and microfiber pollution this year, of which over 10% have successfully passed. This is about average for an assemblymember's bill passage rate in 2019.

    He scores a lifetime 90 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting record. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Bloom has supported most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Bloom has not supported evaluating the economic impact of charter schools on local communities and standardizing out-of-pocket medical costs for emergency care.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Richard Bloom practiced family law for 30 years, assisting low-income clients at Levitt & Quinn Family Law Center and the homeless at PATH Partners. In 1999, he was first elected to the Santa Monica City Council, beginning a 21-year political career that includes his tenure as mayor of Santa Monica and as District 50’s State Assemblymember. A member of the California Coastal Commission, he is a longtime supporter of ending the captivity of marine animals for entertainment purposes and has passed such legislation into law.

    Rep. Richard Bloom is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. He is also funded by the Los Angeles Police Protective League, the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, and the California Association of Highway Patrolmen. However, the threat of alt-right-friendly challenger Will Hess’s potential policies greatly outweighs Bloom’s moderate voting record, campaign contributions from police unions, and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Richard Bloom is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.
     

    Last updated: 2020-10-22

State Assembly, 51st District

Member of the State Assembly

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo to keep AD-51 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County, and includes East Los Angeles and the neighborhoods of Lincoln Heights, Eagle Rock, and Chinatown. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show that 85 percent of AD-51 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 85.9 percent voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    Since the primary, Wendy Carrillo stands unchallenged in this election after she won 86.6 percent of the vote in the primaries. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $438,703.55. She has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money and has accepted funds from all three groups.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is from El Salvador and moved to the Boyle Heights neighborhood in 1985. She has lived in Los Angeles ever since, and first won her seat in 2017. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Carrillo is running for re-election to fight for opportunity, equality, and fairness.

    Assemblymember Carrillo’s priorities for AD-51 this year include improving access to quality education and health care, creating economic opportunity, and providing affordable housing. In the Assembly, Carrillo serves on nineteen committees, including Select Committees on Ending the School to Prison Pipeline and Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California. She was recently a co-author of AB 1482, which protects renters from unjust evictions and unreasonable rent increases, and was signed into law in 2019. This year, Carrillo has co-sponsored three bills expanding access to affordable housing and providing medical leave protection for workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. She scores a lifetime score of 90 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation providing oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assemblymember Carrillo was an award-winning journalist, writer, and producer. For ten years, she hosted a community-based radio program on Los Angeles Power 106 fm, discussing issues around access to higher education, environmental justice, and political transparency. More recently, she co-founded Reported.ly, an award-winning social media start-up covering human rights, global conflict, and social movements. She is a longtime supporter of labor rights, health care for all, and better conditions for caregivers.

    Rep. Carrillo is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Wendy Carrillo

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo to keep AD-51 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County, and includes East Los Angeles and the neighborhoods of Lincoln Heights, Eagle Rock, and Chinatown. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show that 85 percent of AD-51 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 85.9 percent voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    Since the primary, Wendy Carrillo stands unchallenged in this election after she won 86.6 percent of the vote in the primaries. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $438,703.55. She has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money and has accepted funds from all three groups.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is from El Salvador and moved to the Boyle Heights neighborhood in 1985. She has lived in Los Angeles ever since, and first won her seat in 2017. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Carrillo is running for re-election to fight for opportunity, equality, and fairness.

    Assemblymember Carrillo’s priorities for AD-51 this year include improving access to quality education and health care, creating economic opportunity, and providing affordable housing. In the Assembly, Carrillo serves on nineteen committees, including Select Committees on Ending the School to Prison Pipeline and Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California. She was recently a co-author of AB 1482, which protects renters from unjust evictions and unreasonable rent increases, and was signed into law in 2019. This year, Carrillo has co-sponsored three bills expanding access to affordable housing and providing medical leave protection for workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. She scores a lifetime score of 90 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation providing oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assemblymember Carrillo was an award-winning journalist, writer, and producer. For ten years, she hosted a community-based radio program on Los Angeles Power 106 fm, discussing issues around access to higher education, environmental justice, and political transparency. More recently, she co-founded Reported.ly, an award-winning social media start-up covering human rights, global conflict, and social movements. She is a longtime supporter of labor rights, health care for all, and better conditions for caregivers.

    Rep. Carrillo is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-11-03