Endorsements

NARAL Pro-Choice California

NARAL Pro-Choice California

NARAL Pro-Choice California is dedicated to protecting and expanding reproductive freedom for all. For more than 50 years, NARAL has worked to guarantee that every woman has the right to make personal decisions regarding the full range of reproductive choices, including preventing unintended pregnancy, bearing healthy children, and choosing legal abortion. Since 1969, NARAL has made history, grown to over 2.5 million members, and met the moments that have defined this fight with action, power and freedom. In recognition of its work defending our constitutional right to choose, Fortune Magazine described NARAL as one of the top 10 advocacy groups in America.

Congress

4th Congressional District

  • Elect Brynne Kennedy to push CA-04 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's geographically diverse 4th Congressional District includes Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Mariposa, and Tuolumne Counties and portions of Fresno, Madera, Nevada, and Placer Counties. Republicans have held this district since 1992, when John Doolittle flipped CA-04 from blue to red. Incumbent Rep. McClintock has held this position since 2009.

    CA-04’s recent voting history suggests that the purple district may flip blue soon. In the 2018 election, Rep. McClintock won by a slim 8-point margin over a Democratic challenger, indicating the changing social and political demographics of the district. In the 2020 Presidential primary, 48 percent of CA-04 voted for a Democratic candidate and 52 percent voted for a Republican candidate. Before that, In the 2016 Presidential election, Donald Trump won 54 percent of the vote in CA-04, with 39.2 percent for Hillary Clinton and 6.7 percent for third-party candidates. 

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Brynne Kennedy trailed Republican incumbent Tom McClintock by 10.9 percent. The four unsuccessful candidates collected 9.4 percent of the total vote, which will put the choice between Kennedy and McClintock in November. Half of those other votes were won by the only other woman candidate, who is a registered Republican, which suggests that gender could be a deciding factor against party lines for voters in CA-04.

    Kennedy’s campaign is primarily funded by large individual contributions (84 percent) and has not accepted any corporate PAC donations or fossil fuel money. Kennedy has accepted $13,135 from pharmaceuticals and health products. Kennedy has also received contributions from the Blue Dog PAC, which is composed of moderate Democrats supporting fiscal conservatism, and Jim Cooper for Assembly, whose campaign is primarily funded by police money. Rep. McClintock’s campaign is backed by the Majority Committee PAC, which is dedicated to winning a Republican Majority in the House of Representatives. Rep. McClintock has accepted $31,559 from the oil and gas industries and $10,135 from gun rights groups. He is also endorsed by the California Pro-Life Council, California Republican Assembly, and the National Rifle Association.

    About the Candidate

    Brynne Kennedy is from Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and moved to Roseville in 2019. According to campaign materials, she is running for Congress to put partisanship aside to fight the right solutions for a more progressive California. Kennedy, a businesswoman, founded Topia and Mobility4All, organizations that focus on mobility software and relieving the refugee crisis, respectively. Kennedy has won several awards for her work in the global mobility field, including 2016 Entrepreneur of the Year, 2016 Management Today’s 35 under 35, 2017 Workforce Game Changer, 2017 Entrepreneur of the Year, Worldwide Employee Relocation Council’s Meritorious Service Award, and the London Business School’s Distinguished Alumni Entrepreneur award.

    If elected, Kennedy’s priorities for CA-04 include strengthening the Affordable Care Act, protecting reproductive health services, investing in a clean energy economy, and updating the district’s water infrastructure. As a prominent businesswoman, Kennedy has demonstrated strong support for women’s rights, especially in the workplace. Kennedy also supports gun violence prevention. She supports immigration reform through hiring more border patrol, protecting DACA, and reforming the visa and asylum process. However, she does support building physical barriers at the border as part of her views on immigration.

    Kennedy is endorsed by many progressive groups, such as California Teachers Association, Equality California, NARAL-Pro Choice America, and the National Women’s Political Caucus. Despite Kennedy’s minimal roots in the district, the threat of Republican McClintock’s policies greatly outweighs Kennedy’s short history in the district and lack of government experience. According to our analysis, Brynne Kennedy is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Brynne Kennedy

    Elect Brynne Kennedy to push CA-04 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-20

8th Congressional District

  • Elect Chris Bubser to push CA-08 in the right direction.

    About the Position
    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District
    California’s 8th congressional district includes parts of Inyo, Mono, and San Bernardino Counties. This district was represented by Nancy Pelosi until 2012, when redistricting allowed Republican Paul Cook to flip CA-08 from blue to red. Rep. Cook is retiring from Congress, leaving this seat open in the 2020 race. This district has favored Republican candidates in recent state and national elections, voting for Republican John Cox by a 19.6 percent margin in 2018, and for Donald Trump by a 15.1 percent margin in 2016.

    About the Race
    In the primary, Democrat Chris Bubser trailed Republican State Assemblymember Jay Obernolte by a margin of 6.2 percent. Bubser’s campaign is not funded by corporate PAC money or fossil fuel money, and she has the endorsement of End Citizens United. Obernolte’s campaign has not committed to refusing fossil fuel money, has received donations from the San Bernardino County Safety Employees’ Benefit Association PAC, and is backed by the Republican Majority Committee PAC, which is dedicated to winning a Republican Majority in the House of Representatives.

    About the Candidate
    Chris Bubser is from Pennsylvania and has lived in Mammoth Lakes for over 13 years. According to campaign materials, she is running to bring responsive representation to California’s 8th congressional district.

    Bubser is a biotech engineer and health-care advocate. When the Affordable Care Act was under attack in 2017, she used her professional knowledge and personal experience with care management to advocate for affordable health care. Bubser’s interest in science extends to the outdoors, and she has a strong desire to work to protect California’s natural resources. She is also cofounder of the community group HangOutDoGood (HODG), a grassroots coalition of volunteers working to elect progressive candidates, and she serves as a trustee at her temple.

    Chris Bubser is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district, including Indivisible, Bend the Arc: Jewish Action PAC and Equality California. In contrast to Trump-endorsed Assemblymember Obernolte, who has focused his platform on defending freedom and being tough on crime, Bubser will bring to this seat a progressive perspective rooted in science and collective action. She will apply her focus to improving the lived experience of constituents in the areas of health-care access, natural-resource protections, and public-education improvements. According to our analysis, Chris Bubser is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Chris Bubser

    Elect Chris Bubser to push CA-08 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    Last updated: 2020-10-20

10th Congressional District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect Congressional Representative Josh Harder to keep CA-10 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 10th Congressional District includes Stanislaus County and portions of San Joaquin County. Incumbent Josh Harder flipped this district in 2018, when he was elected to his first term in Congress. The most recent election results show 48.5 percent of CD-10 voted for Hillary Clinton for president and 45.5 percent voted for Donald Trump. In 2018, 50.5 percent of voters chose a Republican candidate over Gavin Newsom, indicating that CD-10 is a purple district.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Josh Harder led Republican challenger Ted Howze by a margin of 10.2 percent. Rep. Harder’s campaign is not funded by fossil fuel money; however, he has accepted at least $24,000 from corporate PACs and $10,000 from Rep. Lowenthal, who is funded by the National Fraternal Order of Police PAC. Howze’s campaign has not committed to any of the pledges and is backed by BP Industries and MTC Distributing. Also noteworthy is that 40 percent of Howze’s total funds raised were from candidate self-financing.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Harder, a former businessman, is from Turlock, CA. According to campaign materials, Rep. Harder is running for re-election to stand up to Washington’s corruption and put Valley families first.

    Rep. Harder’s priorities for CA-10 this year have included affordable health care, fair and humane immigration reform, fighting corruption, building sustainable water infrastructure, and creating jobs. He currently sits on two committees: House Committee on Agriculture and House Committee on Education and Labor. This year, Rep. Harder has voted 97 percent of the time with Nancy Pelosi and 91 percent of the time with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. In the two votes that Pelosi and Rep. Harder disagreed on, Pelosi voted for the Bipartisan Budget Act on Passage, while Rep. Harder voted against, and Rep. Harder voted with Republicans for the American Dream and Promise Act, while Pelosi voted against. On July 21, 2020, Rep. Harder voted against H.R. 6395, the Pocan Amendment, which would have cut all Pentagon funds and accounts by 10 percent. As of August 21, 2020, Rep. Harder has yet to cosponsor H.R. 40, which would begin the formal process of studying the case for reparations to Black Americans, despite saying that he has been a lifelong proponent of social justice.

    Rep. Harder has sponsored 37 bills about education, national security, health, taxation, and agriculture this year, of which none have successfully passed.

    Rep. Harder is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups and leaders, such as President Barack Obama, End Citizens United, California Teachers Association, and Moms Demand Action. He is also endorsed by Deputy Sheriff Dana Rodriguez and former Chowchilla Police Chief Al Lucchesi. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Howze’s potential policies greatly outweighs Harder’s moderate voting record and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Harder is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Josh Harder

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Josh Harder to keep CA-10 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-20

12th Congressional District

  • Re-elect Speaker Nancy Pelosi to keep CA-12 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.

    About the District

    California's 12th Congressional District includes part of San Francisco County. Republicans last held this district until 1992, when Tom Lantos won and flipped CA-12 from red to blue; it has been reliably democratic in every election since. Although Nancy Pelosi has been a member of Congress since 1987, she began representing CA-12 in 2013, after the district lines were redrawn. In recent state and federal elections, this district has supported democratic candidates by overwhelming margins. Hillary Clinton earned 86 percent of the vote in 2016, and Gavin Newsom earned 87 percent of the vote in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democratic incumbent Representative Nancy Pelosi led Democratic Socialist challenger Shahid Buttar by a margin of 61 percent. Rep. Pelosi has received corporate PAC funds from PG&E, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and FedEx, and has not pledged to refuse fossil fuel or police money in her campaign. She has also received donations from Human Rights Campaign, End Citizens United, and Everytown for Gun Safety PAC. Challenger Buttar has pledged to refuse fossil fuel money, and has not received any corporate PAC donations.

    This race is unique, as Pelosi currently leads the Democratic Caucus as the highest-ranking woman in government, and has been selected by a majority in the House of Representatives to serve as Speaker of the House. This position makes her 2nd in the line of succession to the Presidency.

    About the Candidate

    Congressional Representative and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is originally from Baltimore, Maryland, and is the daughter of former Baltimore Democratic Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. She is the incumbent, having served in Congress since 1987. She first moved to San Francisco in 1969 and started a Democratic Party club at her home. When she entered politics, it was originally behind the scenes as a fundraiser and recruiter of Democratic candidates. It wasn’t until she turned 47, after her youngest child had left for college, that she ran for office herself in 1987, raising $1 million in seven weeks to win a special election and her first term in Congress. Speaker Pelosi is the 52nd speaker of the House of Representatives. She is the first woman to serve as speaker of the House and is in her third term in this position.

    In representing the needs and interests of the 12th Congressional District, Speaker Pelosi has advanced local policy priorities that have historically pushed the country in a progressive direction. Speaker Pelosi played a role in resetting the agenda on LGBTQIA+ rights and the AIDS crisis during a time when both were vilified in the national debate. Speaker Pelosi also played a major role in designing the landmark assault weapons ban that passed in 1994 and was in effect until it expired in 2004.

    In her role as speaker of the House, Speaker Pelosi decides which legislation is voted on. Under her leadership, the Democratic caucus in the House has steered a firmly moderate course, driven by deep relationships with donors and special interests and a rejection of taking bold, values-driven stances that align with broad public sentiment. Recent critiques of Speaker Pelosi’s leadership include her combative stance toward younger, more progressive, and vocal women of color in Congress, her endorsement of Joe Kennedy III over incumbent senator Ed Markey, her reluctant impeachment of Donald Trump on only the narrowest of grounds, her lack of support for a Green New Deal (or any other proposal) to avoid climate armageddon, and her choice of leadership at the DCCC--which has actively tried to protect incumbent Democrats from progressive challengers, no matter how abhorrent their records.

    As the leader of the House, Speaker Pelosi’s priorities in recent months have been focused on pushing for additional stimulus and support funding in response to COVID-19. If re-elected, she promises to prioritize rejoining the Paris Climate Accord, enhancing the Affordable Care Act, allowing the federal government to negotiate lower prescription drug prices, and defending our democracy from foreign attacks.

    While challenger Democratic Socialist Shahid Buttar has committed to pushing a Green New Deal, Medicare for All, and voting, disability, and digital rights, his campaign has been accused of toxic workplace conditions with a particularly hostile environment for women working on this team. As a result, local progressive groups have stepped back from his campaign.

    Speaker Pelosi has been endorsed by many statewide and local progressive groups, including End Citizens United, Planned Parenthood, EMILY’s List, and SF Rising Action. According to our analysis, Speaker Pelosi remains the strongest choice for representative leadership in office in this election despite a troubling legacy of moderate leadership during a time when the country deserves a bold, progressive vision. That said, we encourage more progressive candidates that will better reflect this community’s needs to run in future cycles.

    Nancy Pelosi

    Re-elect Speaker Nancy Pelosi to keep CA-12 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-20

21st Congressional District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect Congressional Representative TJ Cox to maintain progressive leadership in CA-21.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 21st Congressional District includes parts of Fresno, Kern, Kings, and Tulare Counties. Republicans held this district until 2018, when TJ Cox won and flipped CA-21 from red to blue. Until the 2010 redistricting, this seat was held by Republican Devin Nunes for eight years. In recent federal and state elections, this district has voted blue, with 55.2 percent of the vote going to Hillary Clinton in 2016, and 52.1 percent of the vote going to Gavin Newsom in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative TJ Cox trailed Republican challenger David Valadao by a margin of 11 percent. Valadao held this seat from 2012 until Rep. Cox’s victory in 2018. Rep. Cox’s campaign is not funded by corporate PAC money, but it has not taken pledges to refuse police money or fossil fuel money. He has not accepted any donations from police-adjacent organizations, but is funded by several major airlines, which are substantial users of fossil fuels. Valadao’s campaign has not pledged to refuse fossil fuel, police, or corporate PAC money, and is backed by Koch Industries, Petroleum Marketer’s Association, and several Republican leadership PACs.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Cox, a former engineer and small businessman, is from Walnut Creek, CA. According to campaign materials, Rep. Cox is running for re-election to continue pushing for community development, job creation, and local opportunities for his constituents.

    Rep. Cox’s priorities for CA-21 this year have included health research, TRIO funding to support education initiatives for underserved students, and agricultural research and technology. He currently sits on two committees: Natural Resources (ranks 8th), and Agriculture (ranks 12th). This year, Rep. Cox has voted 100 percent of the time with Nancy Pelosi and 92 percent of the time with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. In contrast to Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, Rep. Cox voted for the passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementation Act, in favor of the conference report for the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020, and for making emergency supplemental appropriations. Rep. Cox has sponsored 21 bills about the armed forces and veterans’ support, clean water, and education. Of those bills, the majority are in committee or have been referred to committee.  

    Rep. Cox is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district, including End Citizens United, Planned Parenthood, and Equality California. According to our analysis, Rep. Cox is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    TJ Cox

    Re-elect Congressional Representative TJ Cox to maintain progressive leadership in CA-21.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-20

25th Congressional District

  • Elect Christy Smith to push CA-25 back in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 25th Congressional District includes parts of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Republicans held this district from 1992 to 2018, when Katie Hill won and flipped CA-25 from red to blue in the historic 2018 midterm elections. Rep. Hill resigned mid-term in 2019, resulting in a low-turnout special election that was won by Republican Mike Garcia. A Democratic victory in this district in November will help retain control of the House of Representatives and advance a progressive agenda.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democratic challenger Christy Smith led Republican incumbent Mike Garcia by a margin of 7.8 percent. Smith has not pledged to refuse fossil fuel or police money, but has pledged that her campaign will not take corporate PAC money. She has received financial support from a variety of progressive organization PACs, including End Citizens United, Equality California, EMILY’s List, and Clean. Smith has also pledged not to take donations from special interests, Washington lobbyists, health insurance companies, or big drug companies. In contrast, Rep. Garcia, who spent 10 years working for a defense contractor, has numerous problematic campaign funders, including Lockheed Martin Corporation, and the Lincoln Club of Orange County. Garcia has disagreed with Speaker Pelosi on 64 percent of votes since he joined the House.

    About the Candidate

    Christy Smith, an education professional and member of the State Assembly, has lived in Santa Clarita for the last 40 years. According to campaign materials, Assemblywoman Smith is running for office to invest in public education by providing teachers with a living wage, reducing class sizes, making college more affordable, and improving technical training programs.

    Assemblywoman Smith wants to reinstate state and local tax deductions, which would lower taxes for families by up to $12,000 a year. She supports ending Citizens United and refuses donations from the gun lobby, Big Tobacco, and other federal corporate PACs. In Congress, Assemblywoman Smith would support a public health-care option to build on the Affordable Care Act, lowering the price of prescriptions, and protecting reproductive health-care rights and Planned Parenthood funding. She also supports strong climate action, gun safety, protecting our seniors retirement security, human rights, and immigration reform, and she serves as chair of the Joint Legislative Committee on Emergency Management.

    Assemblywoman Smith currently represents portions of this district as a member of the California State Assembly. As is common in historically Republican districts like hers, she scored an unimpressive 48 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. This rating is primarily owed to no votes on AB 362, which allows the state to contract operators at safe-injection sites in the Bay Area, and AB 1215, which bans biometric surveillance and facial-recognition technology from use in police body cameras for three years. She also had problematic votes on legislation related to affordable housing, economic justice, racial justice, and political accountability. However, she has also worked to protect homeowners against excessive property taxation, and to mandate that revenue from the gas tax be spent solely on transportation infrastructure projects. Based on our analysis, Assemblywoman Smith’s votes move her district in a progressive direction.

    Christy Smith is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. Former President Obama also endorsed her in this race, as well as many other current U.S. officials from across the country. According to our analysis, Rep. Christy Smith is the strongest choice for equitable leadership in office.

     

    Christy Smith

    Elect Christy Smith to push CA-25 back in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

39th Congressional District

  • Re-elect Congressional Representative Gil Cisneros to keep CA-39 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 39th Congressional District includes parts of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Bernardino Counties. Republicans held this district from 2011 to 2018, when Gil Cisneros won and flipped CA-39 from red to blue. In 2016, Democrat Hillary Clinton won this district by an 8.6 percent margin. In 2018, Republican John Cox won this district in the gubernatorial general election by a narrow margin of 0.8 percent.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Gil Cisneros trailed Republican challenger Young Kim by a margin of 1.4 percent. Cisneros’s campaign has pledged not to take fossil fuel money and has followed through on that commitment. He also pledged not to take corporate PAC funding, but he did attend a fundraiser hosted by corporate lobbyists. Kim’s campaign is backed by the Republican Super PAC Congressional Leadership Fund, which is dedicated to winning a Republican majority in the House of Representatives.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Cisneros, a veteran and education advocate, is from Los Angeles. According to campaign materials, Rep. Cisneros is running for re-election to ensure that future generations have access to a ladder of opportunities similar to what was available to him through the Navy.

    Rep. Cisneros’s priorities for CA-39 this year have included advocating for Small Business Development Centers, education programs that serve Hispanic- and Minority-Serving Institutions, students with disabilities and English language learners, Emergency Solutions Grants to prevent homelessness and the Community Development Block Grants, and funding for public health agencies. He currently sits on two committees: Veterans' Affairs (ranks 11th) and Armed Services (ranks 20th). This year, Rep. Cisneros has voted 100 percent of the time with Nancy Pelosi and 93 percent of the time with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. His divergence from Rep. Ocasio-Cortez included votes in favor of the National Defense Authorization Act, the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementation Act, and appropriations for the Department of the Interior. Rep. Cisneros has sponsored 15 bills about armed forces, national security, and immigration this year. Of those bills, five have been referred to committee, eight are in committee, and two have been received by the Senate.

    Rep. Cisneros is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. He is also endorsed by the Los Angeles County Professional Peace Officers Association. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Kim’s potential policies greatly outweighs Cisneros’s moderate voting record and inaction on campaign financing. According to our analysis, Rep. Cisneros is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Gil Cisneros

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Gil Cisneros to keep CA-39 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

45th Congressional District

  • Re-elect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CA-45 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 45th Congressional District includes parts of Orange County. Republicans typically held this district until 2018, when Katie Porter won and flipped CA-45 from red to blue. The most recent election results show 49.8 percent of AD-45 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 50.6 percent of the district voted for Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    Following the March 3 primary election, Democrat incumbent Representative Katie Porter is leading Republican challenger Greg Raths by a margin of 32.9 percent. Rep. Porter’s campaign has pledged to refuse fossil fuel money; the campaign has yet to pledge to refuse corporate PAC and police money. Rep. Porter’s campaign is funded by California universities, Democratic Party–aligned groups, and corporate money. Raths’ campaign has not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money and is funded in large part by insurance companies and financial interests.

    About the Candidate

    Representative Katie Porter is from Fort Dodge, IA, and now resides in Irvine, CA. She is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2019. According to campaign materials, she is running for re-election to hold Republicans and their special interests in Washington accountable.

    In Congress, Rep. Porter has played an instrumental role in advancing reforms that have helped American families have a fair economic opportunity by helping to pass legislation to fight against abusive credit card fees. Toward the end of 2019, she gained a position on the Committee on Oversight and Reform due to her expert questioning style in congressional hearings. She also sits on the Committee on Financial Services, where she serves on the Consumer Protection and Financial Institutions, as well as the Investor Protection, Entrepreneurship, and Capital Markets subcommittees. Prior to Rep. Porter’s election to Congress, she was a law professor at UC Irvine and a consumer rights advocate, where she defended working families against predatory banking practices.

    Rep. Porter’s priorities for CA-45 this year have included improving patient safety and helping working families during the COVID-19 pandemic, providing student borrower relief, and pushing for more accountability from the Pentagon. She currently sits on two committees: the Committee on Financial Services and the Committee on Oversight and Reform. This year, Rep. Porter has voted 99 percent of the time with Nancy Pelosi and 92 percent of the time with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Significant legislation they’ve disagreed on is the Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Humanitarian Assistance and Security at the Southern Border, which Rep. Porter voted for and Rep. Ocasio-Cortez against. Rep. Porter has co-sponsored four bills to increase accountability from the police, to protect the USPS, and to require Trump to obtain congressional approval before engaging in military action against Iran this year, all of which have successfully passed the House but remain in the Senate.

    Rep. Porter is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Rep. Porter is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Katie Porter

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Katie Porter to keep CA-45 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

48th Congressional District

  • Re-elect Congressional Representative Harley Rouda to keep CA-48 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 48th Congressional District includes parts of Orange County. Republicans typically held this district until 2018, when Harley Rouda won and flipped CA-48 from red to blue. Recent state and federal elections have shown close margins in CA-48. This district voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016, with 47.9 percent. However, CA-48 voted in favor of Republican candidate John Cox in the 2018 gubernatorial election, with 52.1 percent.

    About the Race

    Following the March 3 primary election, Democrat incumbent Representative Rouda is leading Republican challenger Michelle Steel by a margin of 11.8 percent. Rep. Rouda’s campaign is not funded by fossil fuel money or corporate PAC money. While he has not taken the police money pledge, he has not received any donations from police organizations. Rep. Rouda has been financially backed by a variety of progressive organization PACs, including Human Rights Campaign, Indivisible, Equality, and End Citizens United. Challenger Steel’s campaign has not committed to refusing police money, fossil fuel money, or corporate PAC money. She is funded by several right-wing and libertarian organizations, including the Liberty Fund and the Lincoln Club of Orange County. Steel has also donated $1.25 million of her own money to the campaign. Although Rep. Rouda bested challenger Steel by a double-digit margin in the March primary, the four Republican candidates in that race earned a combined total of 50.6 percent of the vote, confirming the likelihood of a close race in November.  

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Rouda, a former attorney and real estate executive, is from Ohio and has lived in Laguna Beach, CA, since 2007. According to campaign materials, Rep. Rouda is running for re-election to continue his bipartisan efforts to improve life in Orange County by revitalizing the economy, reducing taxation, and improving the affordability of prescription drugs.

    Rep. Rouda’s priorities for CA-48 this year have included allocating federal dollars to combat climate change, protections for refugees of the Vietnam War, mental-health services for veterans, and support for homeless individuals and low-income home ownership. He currently sits on two committees: Oversight and Reform (ranks 9th), and Transportation and Infrastructure (ranks 37th). This year, Rep. Rouda has voted 100 percent of the time with Nancy Pelosi and 92 percent of the time with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. In contrast to Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, Rep. Rouda voted in favor of passing the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementation Act, the conference report for the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020, and the motion to concur on Senate amendments to the DHS Cyber Hunt and Incident Response Teams Act. Rep. Rouda has sponsored 24 bills about environmental and coastal protections, infrastructure improvements, and small-business support. Of those bills, one has been received in the Senate, and the majority of the others are in committee or referred to committee.

    Rep. Rouda is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. The threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Michelle Steel’s potential policies greatly outweighs the moderating effect of Rep. Rouda’s bipartisan approach to the legislative process. According to our analysis, Rep. Rouda is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Harley Rouda

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Harley Rouda to keep CA-48 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

49th Congressional District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect Congressional Representative Mike Levin to keep CA-49 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 49 Congressional District includes parts of San Diego and Orange Counties. Republicans held this district from 2002 to 2018, when Mike Levin won and flipped CA-49 from red to blue. In recent state and federal elections, this district has voted for democratic candidates by a slim margin. In 2016, Hillary Clinton won 50.7 percent of the vote, and in 2018, Gavin Newsom won 51.5 percent of the vote.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Levin led Republican challenger Brian Maryott by a margin of 13.2 percent. Rep. Levin’s campaign has not pledged to refuse police money, but has publicly refused to accept corporate PAC donations and fossil fuel money. He has received donations from several progressive organization PACs, including End Citizens United, Planned Parenthood, and Human Rights Campaign. Challenger Maryott’s campaign has not committed to refusing police, fossil fuel, or corporate PAC money. He has been endorsed by Oceanside Police Officers’ Association, and has received funding from Build the Wall PAC.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Levin, an attorney and former director of the Democratic Party of Orange County, lives in San Juan Capistrano. According to campaign materials, Rep. Levin is running for re-election to continue his environmental protection efforts and improve the lives of the families in the district.

    Rep. Levin’s priorities for CA-49 this year have included removing nuclear waste, researching the gun violence epidemic, and a variety of land and water conservation projects in the district. He currently sits on three committees: Natural Resources (ranks 10th), Veterans’ Affairs (ranks 5th), and Climate Crisis (ranks 7th). This year, Rep. Levin has voted 100 percent of the time with Nancy Pelosi and 94 percent of the time with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. In contrast to Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, Rep. Levin voted in favor of passing the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementation Act, in support of making emergency appropriations during the 2019 fiscal year, and in favor of Restoring the Tax Fairness for States and Localities Act. Rep. Levin has sponsored 22 bills about armed forces and veterans’ affairs, environmental protections, and education this year. Of these bills, two have been referred to the Senate, and the rest are either in committee or referred to committee.

    Rep. Levin is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district, including End Citizens United, Indivisible 49, and Human Rights Campaign. He is also endorsed by the Peace Officers Research Association of California and the San Diego Police Officers Association. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Maryott’s potential policies greatly outweighs Rep. Levin’s moderate voting record and connection to police organizations. According to our analysis, Rep. Levin is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Mike Levin

    Re-elect Congressional Representative Mike Levin to keep CA-49 on the right track.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

50th Congressional District

  • Elect Ammar Campa-Najjar to push CA-50 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. California has 53 congressional representatives. There is no term limit for this position.  

    About the District

    California's 50th Congressional District includes parts of San Diego and Riverside Counties. Republicans typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 54.6 percent of AD-52 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 59.1 percent of the district voted for Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Ammar Campa-Najjar led Republican opponent Darrell Issa by a margin of 13.4 percent. Campa-Najjar’s campaign has pledged to refuse corporate PAC money. While his campaign has yet to pledge to refuse fossil fuel or police money, it has not taken such financing. Campa-Najjar’s campaign has raised $2,969,097.44, and top donors are California universities and a Democratic Party–aligned group. Issa’s campaign has raised $5,465,943.21 and is funded by corporate and investment interests, defense contractors, and energy companies.

    About the Candidate

    Ammar Campa-Najjar was born and raised in San Diego. According to campaign materials, he is running for election because he believes in a fair, just, and inclusive America and wants to carry the hard work of democracy forward.

    Campa-Najjar is a San Diego State University lecturer and the owner of a small business that helps other small businesses and nonprofits with small budgets compete against their larger counterparts. Campa-Najjar has served in a White House position in the Executive Office of the President, at the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Campa-Najjar also headed the Office of Public Affairs for the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) at the U.S. Department of Labor. In this role, Campa-Najjar successfully promoted a nationwide effort to expand and diversify the number of registered apprenticeships in America. His efforts helped American workers who were laid off, expanded aid for farmworkers, launched youth job programs, provided vocational training and rehabilitation services to those in the criminal-justice system, and advanced veteran employment opportunities.

    That said, in this second attempt at running for Congressional District 50, Campa- Najjar has fallen short in advocating for large structural health-care reform, and has said that he would have abstained from voting on impeachment. In recent weeks, Campa-Najjar provided a problematic and wandering interview to a far-right group, Defend East County. During that conversation, he was noncommittal about supporting Vice President Joe Biden, stated his support for confirming judicial nominee Amy Coney Barrett, and discussed investigating Hillary Clinton and former President Barack Obama. He has issued a public apology for his lack of judgment in participating in the interview, and has strongly condemned Defend East County for their racist threats against Black Lives Matter protesters. While Campa-Najjar has a moderate Democratic platform, and has even claimed that he would be a conservative voice for his district, he has committed to working with local organizations to navigate complex issues and bring meaningful legislation forward to benefit marginalized communities.

    Despite his more moderate perspective, Campa- Najjar is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. The opponent, Republican Darrell Issa, is endorsed by Republican Party figures. The threat of policies from Issa, who is anti-woman, anti-LGBTQIA+, pro–border wall, and a Trump supporter, are significant and underscore the imperative that this seat be held by a Democrat. Ammar Campa-Najjar the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Ammar Campa-Najjar

    Elect Ammar Campa-Najjar to push CA-50 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals.

    Last updated: 2020-10-26

State Assembly

State Assembly, 2nd District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Jim Wood to keep AD-02 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California’s 2nd Assembly District includes all of Humboldt, Del Norte, Mendocino, and Trinity Counties, as well as part of Sonoma County. Notable cities within the district include Santa Rosa, Fort Bragg, and Eureka. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-02 voted for Hillary Clinton for President in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018. California Assembly District 2 is unique in that it is majority white and rural, yet liberal. A recent decline of the district’s timber industry has led to an increase in marijuana production. Despite recent voter shifts, the district is still the most conservative on the Northern California coast.

    About the Race

    Following the March 3 primary election, Democrat incumbent Jim Wood is leading Republican challenger Charlotte Svolos by a margin of 41.6 percent. Assemblymember Wood’s campaign has raised over $128,000, and is funded largely through health professionals and individual donors. However, Assemblymember Wood has received substantial corporate, fossil fuel, and police funding. Republican challenger Svolos has not filed with the FEC, and does not have public campaign records.

    About the Candidate

    Representative Jim Wood moved to Northern California in 1987. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2014. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election because he wants to continue to improve environmental protections, economic development, and health care. Wood demonstrates a commitment to fighting against rising prescription drug prices, opposing coastline oil drilling, and finding health-care solutions. Assemblymember Wood has received endorsements from notable progressive organizations, including the California Teachers Association, Equality California, Planned Parenthood Northern California, and Sierra Club California. However, he has also received problematic endorsements, including the Peace Officers Research Association of California (PORAC), the largest law-enforcement organization in California. Assemblymember Wood has received 100% ratings from the 2019 Environmental Justice Scoreboard, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California, ACLU of California, California Federation of Teachers, Equality California, and other progressive organizations.

    In the State Assembly, Rep. Wood authored several key bills to address health care, the environment, and immigration. Since the primary election, he has voted in support of affirmative action, environmental protections, and COVID-19 medical leave protections. His Pay to Delay bill prevents drug companies from delaying production of generic drugs. He voted to end transporting oil to the state from offshore drilling facilities, to provide information to residents potentially affected by pollution in their language, and to protect personal data from being used to deport Californians. He currently chairs the Assembly Health Committee. Prior to his election to Assembly District 2, he served two terms as mayor of Healdsburg. Wood is a dentist by practice, with expertise in forensic dentistry, and has a history working with law enforcement in that capacity.

    Rep. Wood is being challenged by Republican Charlotte Svolos. He has scored a lifetime 82 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Wood has shown some willingness to advocate for the needs of constituents and to face down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. That said, his fierce opposition to Medicare for All and his role in undermining the single-payer health-care movement in California are of grave concern. Republican opponent Svolos’s campaign centers on problematic ideals of “immigration reform” and criminal penalties.

    The threat of Republican challenger Svolos’s potential policies greatly outweighs Wood’s somewhat moderate voting record, problematic endorsements, and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Wood is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Jim Wood

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Jim Wood to keep AD-02 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California’s 2nd Assembly District includes all of Humboldt, Del Norte, Mendocino, and Trinity Counties, as well as part of Sonoma County. Notable cities within the district include Santa Rosa, Fort Bragg, and Eureka. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-02 voted for Hillary Clinton for President in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018. California Assembly District 2 is unique in that it is majority white and rural, yet liberal. A recent decline of the district’s timber industry has led to an increase in marijuana production. Despite recent voter shifts, the district is still the most conservative on the Northern California coast.

    About the Race

    Following the March 3 primary election, Democrat incumbent Jim Wood is leading Republican challenger Charlotte Svolos by a margin of 41.6 percent. Assemblymember Wood’s campaign has raised over $128,000, and is funded largely through health professionals and individual donors. However, Assemblymember Wood has received substantial corporate, fossil fuel, and police funding. Republican challenger Svolos has not filed with the FEC, and does not have public campaign records.

    About the Candidate

    Representative Jim Wood moved to Northern California in 1987. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2014. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election because he wants to continue to improve environmental protections, economic development, and health care. Wood demonstrates a commitment to fighting against rising prescription drug prices, opposing coastline oil drilling, and finding health-care solutions. Assemblymember Wood has received endorsements from notable progressive organizations, including the California Teachers Association, Equality California, Planned Parenthood Northern California, and Sierra Club California. However, he has also received problematic endorsements, including the Peace Officers Research Association of California (PORAC), the largest law-enforcement organization in California. Assemblymember Wood has received 100% ratings from the 2019 Environmental Justice Scoreboard, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California, ACLU of California, California Federation of Teachers, Equality California, and other progressive organizations.

    In the State Assembly, Rep. Wood authored several key bills to address health care, the environment, and immigration. Since the primary election, he has voted in support of affirmative action, environmental protections, and COVID-19 medical leave protections. His Pay to Delay bill prevents drug companies from delaying production of generic drugs. He voted to end transporting oil to the state from offshore drilling facilities, to provide information to residents potentially affected by pollution in their language, and to protect personal data from being used to deport Californians. He currently chairs the Assembly Health Committee. Prior to his election to Assembly District 2, he served two terms as mayor of Healdsburg. Wood is a dentist by practice, with expertise in forensic dentistry, and has a history working with law enforcement in that capacity.

    Rep. Wood is being challenged by Republican Charlotte Svolos. He has scored a lifetime 82 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Wood has shown some willingness to advocate for the needs of constituents and to face down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. That said, his fierce opposition to Medicare for All and his role in undermining the single-payer health-care movement in California are of grave concern. Republican opponent Svolos’s campaign centers on problematic ideals of “immigration reform” and criminal penalties.

    The threat of Republican challenger Svolos’s potential policies greatly outweighs Wood’s somewhat moderate voting record, problematic endorsements, and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Wood is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-24

State Assembly, 7th District

  • Re-elect State Asm. McCarty to keep AD-07 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 7th Assembly District includes portions of Sacramento and Yolo counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Kevin McCarty has held this office since he was elected in 2014. The most recent election results show 67.5 percent of AD-07 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 68.3 percent of AD-07 voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Kevin McCarty led Libertarian challenger James O. Just by a margin of 99.6 percent. Assemblymember McCarty’s campaign has raised $401,231.04 and is funded by corporate PACs, fossil fuels, and police money. Just’s campaign has raised $810, has not committed to any pledges, and is funded entirely by individual donations.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember McCarty, a lifelong Sacramentan, previously served as Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Commissioner and as a Sacramento City Council member from 2004 to 2014. He is a longtime supporter of improving the educational system and its accessibility for low- and middle-income families. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember McCarty is running for re-election to continue this work in public education.

    Assemblymember McCarty’s priorities for AD-07 this year include addressing housing affordability, curbing gun violence, fighting climate change, advocating for the middle class, and championing criminal-justice reform. He currently sits on five committees: Budget, Business and Professions, Education, Health, and Natural Resources. He also serves as chair for Budget Subcommittee No. 2 on Education Finance and sits on the Budget Subcommittee No. 6 on Budget Process, Oversight and Program Evaluation.

    Assemblymember McCarty has sponsored 50 bills about education, criminal justice, health, and housing this year, of which nine have been successfully chaptered. Previously, Assemblymember McCarty tried to pass legislation that would require the state attorney general to independently review any case requested by local officials in which a civilian was killed by police. McCarty’s current version of this bill is now more widely supported by Assembly Democrats. Assemblymember McCarty’s lifetime score is 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember McCarty has supported almost all of the progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he has also supported AB 1366, a problematic bill that would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Assemblymember McCarty is endorsed by many progressive groups, such as the California Federation of Teachers and the California Democratic Party. Libertarian challenger Just’s potential policies greatly outweigh Assemblymember McCarty’s inaction on campaign financing. According to our analysis, Assemblymember McCarty is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Kevin McCarty

    Re-elect State Asm. McCarty to keep AD-07 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 7th Assembly District includes portions of Sacramento and Yolo counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Kevin McCarty has held this office since he was elected in 2014. The most recent election results show 67.5 percent of AD-07 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 68.3 percent of AD-07 voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Kevin McCarty led Libertarian challenger James O. Just by a margin of 99.6 percent. Assemblymember McCarty’s campaign has raised $401,231.04 and is funded by corporate PACs, fossil fuels, and police money. Just’s campaign has raised $810, has not committed to any pledges, and is funded entirely by individual donations.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember McCarty, a lifelong Sacramentan, previously served as Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Commissioner and as a Sacramento City Council member from 2004 to 2014. He is a longtime supporter of improving the educational system and its accessibility for low- and middle-income families. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember McCarty is running for re-election to continue this work in public education.

    Assemblymember McCarty’s priorities for AD-07 this year include addressing housing affordability, curbing gun violence, fighting climate change, advocating for the middle class, and championing criminal-justice reform. He currently sits on five committees: Budget, Business and Professions, Education, Health, and Natural Resources. He also serves as chair for Budget Subcommittee No. 2 on Education Finance and sits on the Budget Subcommittee No. 6 on Budget Process, Oversight and Program Evaluation.

    Assemblymember McCarty has sponsored 50 bills about education, criminal justice, health, and housing this year, of which nine have been successfully chaptered. Previously, Assemblymember McCarty tried to pass legislation that would require the state attorney general to independently review any case requested by local officials in which a civilian was killed by police. McCarty’s current version of this bill is now more widely supported by Assembly Democrats. Assemblymember McCarty’s lifetime score is 96 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember McCarty has supported almost all of the progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he has also supported AB 1366, a problematic bill that would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Assemblymember McCarty is endorsed by many progressive groups, such as the California Federation of Teachers and the California Democratic Party. Libertarian challenger Just’s potential policies greatly outweigh Assemblymember McCarty’s inaction on campaign financing. According to our analysis, Assemblymember McCarty is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 13th District

  • Elect Kathy Miller to push AD-13 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California’s 13th Assembly District includes part of San Joaquin County. Notable cities within the district include Stockton and Tracy. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-13 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018, both with large victory margins. AD-13 is very diverse, with a Latinx majority of 42 percent.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Kathy Miller trailed the other Democrat challenger Carlos Villapudua by a 4 percent margin. Miller's campaign has raised upwards of $105,000, largely from individual, real estate, women’s and labor associations, and trade union donors. Miller has not received police, fossil fuel, or corporate funding; however, she has not signed the #NoCopMoneyCA pledge. Opponent Democrat challenger Carlos Villapudua has raised more than $51,000 and is funded through law enforcement and fossil fuel money.

    About the Candidate

    Kathy Miller is from Southern California and moved to Stockton in 1997. She has served on the San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors since 2014. According to campaign materials, she’s running for Assembly District 13 Representative to advocate for the homeless, improve neighborhoods, and balance the state budget.

    Miller has proven her commitment to progress through her hands-on experiences in public office. At present, she heads the Homelessness Task Force, as well as the Children and Youth Task Force on the Board of Supervisors for San Joaquin County. These two forces, now known as the San Joaquin Continuum of Care, increased the number and improved the quality of public services offered to adults and children reckoning with poverty and homelessness. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Miller utilized her position to ensure that issues of health care and food insecurity were addressed. She is committed to transferring that same dedication in her role in the State Assembly, and promises to fight for health-care expansion for women, seniors, and families.

    Prior to her appointment to the Board of Supervisors, Miller was a councilmember in the Stockton City Council from 2009 to 2014. She spent four of those years as vice mayor, and emerged as a strong voice for fiscal responsibility and an open, transparent, and accountable local government.

    Considering the diversity of AD-13, particularly in the city of Stockton, Miller’s campaign has failed to address issues related to the district’s minority population. These issues include both immigration and police brutality. In a city where Black civilians are 2.9 times as likely and Latinx civilians .9 times as likely to have deadly force used on them by police, law enforcement must be held accountable. Although Miller has not taken any law-enforcement funding, she does not list police accountability as an issue of focus for her campaign. Stockton is also home to the Stockton Staging Facility, a holding area used by ICE to temporarily house detainees. The facility has been the focus of criticism, and does not contain sleeping quarters or showers. Similar to police brutality, Miller has remained silent on this issue.

    Miller is running against Democrat Carlos Villapudua in this upcoming election. Villapudua has strong ties with both law enforcement and the fossil fuel industry. He is endorsed by the California Coalition of Law Enforcement Associations, and has not taken a solid stance on many progressive issues. Miller has received notable endorsements from Equality California, California Federation of Teachers, and the California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Despite our concerns regarding her silence on issues critical to the district, Miller is a particularly strong progressive choice because of her extensive experience in public office and strong endorsements from local and statewide organizations.

    According to our analysis, Miller is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Kathy Miller

    Elect Kathy Miller to push AD-13 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California’s 13th Assembly District includes part of San Joaquin County. Notable cities within the district include Stockton and Tracy. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-13 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018, both with large victory margins. AD-13 is very diverse, with a Latinx majority of 42 percent.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Kathy Miller trailed the other Democrat challenger Carlos Villapudua by a 4 percent margin. Miller's campaign has raised upwards of $105,000, largely from individual, real estate, women’s and labor associations, and trade union donors. Miller has not received police, fossil fuel, or corporate funding; however, she has not signed the #NoCopMoneyCA pledge. Opponent Democrat challenger Carlos Villapudua has raised more than $51,000 and is funded through law enforcement and fossil fuel money.

    About the Candidate

    Kathy Miller is from Southern California and moved to Stockton in 1997. She has served on the San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors since 2014. According to campaign materials, she’s running for Assembly District 13 Representative to advocate for the homeless, improve neighborhoods, and balance the state budget.

    Miller has proven her commitment to progress through her hands-on experiences in public office. At present, she heads the Homelessness Task Force, as well as the Children and Youth Task Force on the Board of Supervisors for San Joaquin County. These two forces, now known as the San Joaquin Continuum of Care, increased the number and improved the quality of public services offered to adults and children reckoning with poverty and homelessness. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Miller utilized her position to ensure that issues of health care and food insecurity were addressed. She is committed to transferring that same dedication in her role in the State Assembly, and promises to fight for health-care expansion for women, seniors, and families.

    Prior to her appointment to the Board of Supervisors, Miller was a councilmember in the Stockton City Council from 2009 to 2014. She spent four of those years as vice mayor, and emerged as a strong voice for fiscal responsibility and an open, transparent, and accountable local government.

    Considering the diversity of AD-13, particularly in the city of Stockton, Miller’s campaign has failed to address issues related to the district’s minority population. These issues include both immigration and police brutality. In a city where Black civilians are 2.9 times as likely and Latinx civilians .9 times as likely to have deadly force used on them by police, law enforcement must be held accountable. Although Miller has not taken any law-enforcement funding, she does not list police accountability as an issue of focus for her campaign. Stockton is also home to the Stockton Staging Facility, a holding area used by ICE to temporarily house detainees. The facility has been the focus of criticism, and does not contain sleeping quarters or showers. Similar to police brutality, Miller has remained silent on this issue.

    Miller is running against Democrat Carlos Villapudua in this upcoming election. Villapudua has strong ties with both law enforcement and the fossil fuel industry. He is endorsed by the California Coalition of Law Enforcement Associations, and has not taken a solid stance on many progressive issues. Miller has received notable endorsements from Equality California, California Federation of Teachers, and the California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Despite our concerns regarding her silence on issues critical to the district, Miller is a particularly strong progressive choice because of her extensive experience in public office and strong endorsements from local and statewide organizations.

    According to our analysis, Miller is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 15th District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Wicks to keep AD-15 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 15th Assembly District includes portions of Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Buffy Wicks has served since 2018, when she was elected. The most recent election results show 87.4 percent of AD-15 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 89.6 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Buffy Wicks led Independent challenger Sara Brink by a margin of 75.1 percent. Assemblymember Wicks’s campaign has raised over $559,000 and has pledged to refuse fossil fuel money. According to her campaign website, she has not accepted any corporate money. However, upon further research into her campaign contributions, it was found that she has accepted money from Airbnb, AT&T, Disney, Salesforce.com, and Tesla. Additionally, she has accepted almost $10,000 from the California Correctional Peace Officers Association and the Richmond Police Officers Association. According to Assemblymember Wicks’s campaign website, she said, “I will not accept any donations from charter school advocacy organizations. I have not accepted any such donations and I will not.” However, her campaign contribution records say otherwise. She has accepted $1,500 from the Charter Public Schools PAC. Brink’s campaign contributions have not been recorded with the Secretary of State’s office.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Wicks, a lifelong grassroots activist, is from Oakland, CA. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she organized against the Iraq War, worked on Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns, served as his deputy director in the White House Office of Public Engagement, and served as executive director of super PAC Priorities USA Action in support of Hillary Clinton for president. She is a longtime supporter of policies that improve the welfare of women and children. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Wicks is running for re-election to join the fight on the most challenging issues, including solving the housing and homelessness crisis, protecting communities from gun violence, increasing funding for food and health-care programs, and ensuring high-quality education across the state.

    Assemblymember Wicks’ priorities for AD-15 this year include education, housing, and health care. She currently sits on six standing committees: Banking and Finance, Budget, Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration, Privacy and Consumer Protection, Public Safety, and Rules. She also serves as chair on the Select Committee on Youth Mental Health. She has sponsored 45 bills about housing, education, health care, and transportation this year, of which eight have successfully been chaptered. She scores a perfect lifetime score of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Wicks has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Assenblymember Wicks is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district, such as Planned Parenthood Northern CA Action Fund, Moms Demand Action, Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, East Bay for Everyone, and Evolve CA. However, she is also endorsed by Berkeley Police Commissioner George Perezvelez. Independent challenger Brink’s campaign website has made it clear that she is not expecting to win, and instead, she is using the platform to address several issues within the current two-party system and urges voters to elect progressive candidates.

    Independent challenger Brink’s lack of a running platform greatly outweighs Assemblymember Wicks’s problematic endorsements and lack of consistency in campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Wicks is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Buffy Wicks

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Wicks to keep AD-15 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 15th Assembly District includes portions of Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Buffy Wicks has served since 2018, when she was elected. The most recent election results show 87.4 percent of AD-15 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 89.6 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat Incumbent Assemblymember Buffy Wicks led Independent challenger Sara Brink by a margin of 75.1 percent. Assemblymember Wicks’s campaign has raised over $559,000 and has pledged to refuse fossil fuel money. According to her campaign website, she has not accepted any corporate money. However, upon further research into her campaign contributions, it was found that she has accepted money from Airbnb, AT&T, Disney, Salesforce.com, and Tesla. Additionally, she has accepted almost $10,000 from the California Correctional Peace Officers Association and the Richmond Police Officers Association. According to Assemblymember Wicks’s campaign website, she said, “I will not accept any donations from charter school advocacy organizations. I have not accepted any such donations and I will not.” However, her campaign contribution records say otherwise. She has accepted $1,500 from the Charter Public Schools PAC. Brink’s campaign contributions have not been recorded with the Secretary of State’s office.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Wicks, a lifelong grassroots activist, is from Oakland, CA. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she organized against the Iraq War, worked on Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns, served as his deputy director in the White House Office of Public Engagement, and served as executive director of super PAC Priorities USA Action in support of Hillary Clinton for president. She is a longtime supporter of policies that improve the welfare of women and children. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Wicks is running for re-election to join the fight on the most challenging issues, including solving the housing and homelessness crisis, protecting communities from gun violence, increasing funding for food and health-care programs, and ensuring high-quality education across the state.

    Assemblymember Wicks’ priorities for AD-15 this year include education, housing, and health care. She currently sits on six standing committees: Banking and Finance, Budget, Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration, Privacy and Consumer Protection, Public Safety, and Rules. She also serves as chair on the Select Committee on Youth Mental Health. She has sponsored 45 bills about housing, education, health care, and transportation this year, of which eight have successfully been chaptered. She scores a perfect lifetime score of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Wicks has supported all progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Assenblymember Wicks is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district, such as Planned Parenthood Northern CA Action Fund, Moms Demand Action, Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, East Bay for Everyone, and Evolve CA. However, she is also endorsed by Berkeley Police Commissioner George Perezvelez. Independent challenger Brink’s campaign website has made it clear that she is not expecting to win, and instead, she is using the platform to address several issues within the current two-party system and urges voters to elect progressive candidates.

    Independent challenger Brink’s lack of a running platform greatly outweighs Assemblymember Wicks’s problematic endorsements and lack of consistency in campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Wicks is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 16th District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan to keep AD-16 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 16th Assembly District includes portions of Alameda and Contra Costa counties. Republicans held this district until 2008, when Democrat Joan Buchanan  won and flipped AD-16 from red to blue. It has flipped back and forth in the last decade. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan has served AD-16 since 2018. The most recent election results show 64.5 percent of AD-16 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 63.2 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan led Republican challenger Joseph Rubay by a margin of 36.6 percent. Bauer-Kahan’s campaign has raised $873,755 and is funded by corporate PACs, police money, and fossil fuel money. Rubay’s campaign has raised $16,525, of which $15,300 is from candidate self-financing. Rubay has not committed to any of the pledges to refuse corporate PACs, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan, a law professor and attorney, is from Orinda, CA. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she taught law at Santa Clara University and Golden State University. She is a longtime supporter of fighting climate change and for a women’s right to choose. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan is running for re-election to protect the environment, fight Trump’s immigration policies, increase access to quality, affordable health care, and help small businesses thrive.

    Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan’s priorities for AD-16 this year include education, public safety, and labor. She currently sits on five committees: Appropriations, Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, Privacy and Consumer Protection, Public Safety, and Banking and Finance. She also serves as chair on the Select Committee on Women’s Reproductive Health. Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has sponsored 31 bills about public safety, environment safety, and labor this year, of which nine have been successfully chaptered. She scores a lifetime score of 81 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

    Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported AB 290, which would prevent dialysis companies from steering patients from Medi-Cal to boost corporate profits. This is not surprising, considering Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has accepted $12,900 from the two dialysis giants in California: Fresenius and DaVita. Additionally, she has consistently failed to support essential housing bills, such as AB 1487, AB 1482, and AB 1279. By accepting almost $10,000 from powerful landlord-lobbying groups like the California Apartment Association PAC and Apartment Association of Greater Los Angeles PAC and failing to support these bills, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has shown AD-16 where her priorities lie.

    Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan is endorsed by several progressive groups, such as EMILY’s List, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and the California League of Conservation Voters. At this time, she does not have any problematic endorsements. The threat of Republican challenger Rubay’s potential policies on strengthening police to solve gun violence greatly outweighs Bauer-Kahan’s moderate voting record and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Rebecca Bauer-Kahan

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan to keep AD-16 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 16th Assembly District includes portions of Alameda and Contra Costa counties. Republicans held this district until 2008, when Democrat Joan Buchanan  won and flipped AD-16 from red to blue. It has flipped back and forth in the last decade. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan has served AD-16 since 2018. The most recent election results show 64.5 percent of AD-16 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 63.2 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan led Republican challenger Joseph Rubay by a margin of 36.6 percent. Bauer-Kahan’s campaign has raised $873,755 and is funded by corporate PACs, police money, and fossil fuel money. Rubay’s campaign has raised $16,525, of which $15,300 is from candidate self-financing. Rubay has not committed to any of the pledges to refuse corporate PACs, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan, a law professor and attorney, is from Orinda, CA. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she taught law at Santa Clara University and Golden State University. She is a longtime supporter of fighting climate change and for a women’s right to choose. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan is running for re-election to protect the environment, fight Trump’s immigration policies, increase access to quality, affordable health care, and help small businesses thrive.

    Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan’s priorities for AD-16 this year include education, public safety, and labor. She currently sits on five committees: Appropriations, Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, Privacy and Consumer Protection, Public Safety, and Banking and Finance. She also serves as chair on the Select Committee on Women’s Reproductive Health. Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has sponsored 31 bills about public safety, environment safety, and labor this year, of which nine have been successfully chaptered. She scores a lifetime score of 81 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records.

    Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported AB 290, which would prevent dialysis companies from steering patients from Medi-Cal to boost corporate profits. This is not surprising, considering Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has accepted $12,900 from the two dialysis giants in California: Fresenius and DaVita. Additionally, she has consistently failed to support essential housing bills, such as AB 1487, AB 1482, and AB 1279. By accepting almost $10,000 from powerful landlord-lobbying groups like the California Apartment Association PAC and Apartment Association of Greater Los Angeles PAC and failing to support these bills, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan has shown AD-16 where her priorities lie.

    Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan is endorsed by several progressive groups, such as EMILY’s List, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and the California League of Conservation Voters. At this time, she does not have any problematic endorsements. The threat of Republican challenger Rubay’s potential policies on strengthening police to solve gun violence greatly outweighs Bauer-Kahan’s moderate voting record and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Bauer-Kahan is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 17th District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember David Chiu to keep AD-17 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 17th Assembly District includes the majority of San Francisco County. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember David Chiu has held this office since being elected in 2014. The most recent election results show 88.1 percent of AD-17 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 89.5 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember David Chiu led write-in Libertarian challenger Starchild by a margin of 100 percent. Chiu’s campaign has raised $882,528 and is funded by police money, fossil fuel money, and corporate PACs. Starchild’s campaign records are not available on the Secretary of State’s website.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Chiu, a civil rights attorney, is originally from Boston and moved to San Francisco in 1996. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assemblymember Chiu served as the president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, a criminal prosecutor with the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office, and founded Grassroots Enterprise, a public affairs technology company. Assemblymember Chiu has extensive involvement in the community, having served as president of the Asian American Bar Association, as Small Business Commissioner, as board member of Partners Ending Domestic Abuse, and as board chair for the Youth Leadership Institute. He is a longtime supporter of the LGBTQIA+ community, and of improving transportation and protecting California renters. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Chiu is running for re-election to create affordable housing, improve schools, protect the environment, and defend civil rights.

    Assemblymember Chiu’s priorities for AD-17 this year include housing, especially with the onset of COVID-19. He currently sits on six standing committees: Housing and Community Development (chair); Arts Subcommittee; Budget Subcommittee; Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration; Business and Professions; and Judiciary. He also serves as chair of the California Asian & Pacific Island Legislative Caucus. Assemblymember Chiu has sponsored 49 bills about environmental safety, transportation, and housing this year, of which 12 have been successfully chaptered. He scores a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Chiu has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he also supported a problematic bill (AB 1366), which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Assemblymember Chiu is endorsed by several progressive groups, such as Equality California, Evolve, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and the Sierra Club. At this time, he does not have any problematic endorsements. His progressive record with legislation and community involvement speaks for itself, although his lack of campaign finance pledges needs improvement. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Chiu is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    David Chiu

    Re-elect State Assemblymember David Chiu to keep AD-17 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 17th Assembly District includes the majority of San Francisco County. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember David Chiu has held this office since being elected in 2014. The most recent election results show 88.1 percent of AD-17 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 89.5 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember David Chiu led write-in Libertarian challenger Starchild by a margin of 100 percent. Chiu’s campaign has raised $882,528 and is funded by police money, fossil fuel money, and corporate PACs. Starchild’s campaign records are not available on the Secretary of State’s website.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Chiu, a civil rights attorney, is originally from Boston and moved to San Francisco in 1996. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Assemblymember Chiu served as the president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, a criminal prosecutor with the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office, and founded Grassroots Enterprise, a public affairs technology company. Assemblymember Chiu has extensive involvement in the community, having served as president of the Asian American Bar Association, as Small Business Commissioner, as board member of Partners Ending Domestic Abuse, and as board chair for the Youth Leadership Institute. He is a longtime supporter of the LGBTQIA+ community, and of improving transportation and protecting California renters. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Chiu is running for re-election to create affordable housing, improve schools, protect the environment, and defend civil rights.

    Assemblymember Chiu’s priorities for AD-17 this year include housing, especially with the onset of COVID-19. He currently sits on six standing committees: Housing and Community Development (chair); Arts Subcommittee; Budget Subcommittee; Budget Subcommittee No. 4 on State Administration; Business and Professions; and Judiciary. He also serves as chair of the California Asian & Pacific Island Legislative Caucus. Assemblymember Chiu has sponsored 49 bills about environmental safety, transportation, and housing this year, of which 12 have been successfully chaptered. He scores a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Chiu has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he also supported a problematic bill (AB 1366), which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Assemblymember Chiu is endorsed by several progressive groups, such as Equality California, Evolve, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and the Sierra Club. At this time, he does not have any problematic endorsements. His progressive record with legislation and community involvement speaks for itself, although his lack of campaign finance pledges needs improvement. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Chiu is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 18th District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Rob Bonta to keep AD-18 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 18th Assembly District includes a third of Alameda County. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rob Bonta has held this office since being elected in 2012. The most recent election results show 85.9 percent of AD-18 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 88.3 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rob Bonta led Republican challenger Steve Slauson by a margin of 78.6 percent. Bonta’s campaign has raised $1,041,780 and is funded by police money, fossil fuel money, and corporate PACs. Bonta pledged to refuse fossil fuel money, but has accepted a $1,500 contribution from Sempra Energy. Slauson has not electronically filed campaign contributions for this election cycle with the Secretary of State’s office. Slauson also faced off against Assemblymember Bonta in 2018’s general election and lost in a landslide.


    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Bonta, a civil rights attorney, is from Alameda, CA. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served as a deputy city attorney for both the City and County of San Francisco, as an elected member of the Alameda Health Care District Board of Directors, as board president for the Social Service Human Relations board, as board president for Alternatives in Action, and as chair of the Economic Development Commission. He is a longtime activist in the ongoing fight for racial, economic, and social justice. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Bonta is running for re-election to continue working for better schools, safer streets, and more prosperous communities.

    Assemblymember Bonta’s priorities for AD-18 this year include social justice as related to jails, and ICE, taxation, and discrimination. He currently sits on four committees: Appropriations, Communications and Conveyance, Governmental Organization, and Health. Assemblymember Bonta has sponsored 54 bills about discrimination, labor, taxation, health, and education this year, of which 12 have been successfully chaptered. He scores a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Bonta has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he has also supported a problematic bill (AB 1366), which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Assemblymember Bonta is endorsed by several progressive groups, such as California Teachers Association, Equality California, and the California League of Conservation Voters. He is also endorsed by the Peace Officers Research Association of California, California Association of Highway Patrolmen, Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and California Statewide Law Enforcement Association. However, the threat of Republican challenger Slauson’s potential policies greatly outweighs Assemblymember Bonta’s lack of campaign finance pledges and overwhelming support from police organizations. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Bonta is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Rob Bonta

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Rob Bonta to keep AD-18 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 18th Assembly District includes a third of Alameda County. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rob Bonta has held this office since being elected in 2012. The most recent election results show 85.9 percent of AD-18 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 88.3 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Rob Bonta led Republican challenger Steve Slauson by a margin of 78.6 percent. Bonta’s campaign has raised $1,041,780 and is funded by police money, fossil fuel money, and corporate PACs. Bonta pledged to refuse fossil fuel money, but has accepted a $1,500 contribution from Sempra Energy. Slauson has not electronically filed campaign contributions for this election cycle with the Secretary of State’s office. Slauson also faced off against Assemblymember Bonta in 2018’s general election and lost in a landslide.


    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Bonta, a civil rights attorney, is from Alameda, CA. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served as a deputy city attorney for both the City and County of San Francisco, as an elected member of the Alameda Health Care District Board of Directors, as board president for the Social Service Human Relations board, as board president for Alternatives in Action, and as chair of the Economic Development Commission. He is a longtime activist in the ongoing fight for racial, economic, and social justice. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Bonta is running for re-election to continue working for better schools, safer streets, and more prosperous communities.

    Assemblymember Bonta’s priorities for AD-18 this year include social justice as related to jails, and ICE, taxation, and discrimination. He currently sits on four committees: Appropriations, Communications and Conveyance, Governmental Organization, and Health. Assemblymember Bonta has sponsored 54 bills about discrimination, labor, taxation, health, and education this year, of which 12 have been successfully chaptered. He scores a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Bonta has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he has also supported a problematic bill (AB 1366), which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies.

    Assemblymember Bonta is endorsed by several progressive groups, such as California Teachers Association, Equality California, and the California League of Conservation Voters. He is also endorsed by the Peace Officers Research Association of California, California Association of Highway Patrolmen, Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, and California Statewide Law Enforcement Association. However, the threat of Republican challenger Slauson’s potential policies greatly outweighs Assemblymember Bonta’s lack of campaign finance pledges and overwhelming support from police organizations. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Bonta is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 22nd District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Kevin Mullin to keep AD-22 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 22nd Assembly District includes the majority of San Mateo County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 75.2 percent of AD-22 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 74.4 percent for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assembly Speaker Pro Tem Kevin Mullin led Republican challenger Mark Gilham by a margin of 75.7 percent. Mullin’s campaign has raised $538,122 so far. While his campaign is not funded by fossil fuels, he has accepted significant amounts from police and corporate PACs. Assemblymember Mullin has not taken the pledge to refuse fossil fuel, police, or corporate PAC money. Gilham’s campaign records have not been electronically filed with the Secretary of state.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Mullin, a lifelong public servant, is a San Mateo County native residing in South San Francisco. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served on the South San Francisco City Council from 2007–2012 and as mayor in 2011. Additionally, he served as a political director for former State Assembly member Gene Mullin, as well as district director for former State Senator (now Congresswoman) Jackie Speier. He is a longtime supporter and advocate for public transportation. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Mullin is running for re-election to strengthen our democracy through elections reform.

    Assemblymember Mullin’s priorities for AD-22 this year include affordable housing, transportation infrastructure, climate change, and voting. He currently sits on five standing committees: Budget, Budget Subcommittee No. 3 on Resources and Transportation, Business and Professions, Elections and Redistricting, and Revenue and Taxation. Assemblymember Mullin has sponsored 36 bills about elections, transportation, and housing this year, of which nine have been successfully chaptered. He scores a lifetime score of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Mullin has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said he has also supported AB 1366, which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies. Considering he has accepted $3,000 from telecom giant AT&T, that is not surprising.

    Assemblymember Mullin is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, such as California Teachers Association, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and several local elected officials. At this time, Assemblymember Mullin does not have any problematic endorsements. Republican challenger Gilham’s potential policies greatly outweighs Assemblymember Mullin’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Mullin is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Kevin Mullin

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Kevin Mullin to keep AD-22 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 22nd Assembly District includes the majority of San Mateo County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 75.2 percent of AD-22 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 74.4 percent for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assembly Speaker Pro Tem Kevin Mullin led Republican challenger Mark Gilham by a margin of 75.7 percent. Mullin’s campaign has raised $538,122 so far. While his campaign is not funded by fossil fuels, he has accepted significant amounts from police and corporate PACs. Assemblymember Mullin has not taken the pledge to refuse fossil fuel, police, or corporate PAC money. Gilham’s campaign records have not been electronically filed with the Secretary of state.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Mullin, a lifelong public servant, is a San Mateo County native residing in South San Francisco. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served on the South San Francisco City Council from 2007–2012 and as mayor in 2011. Additionally, he served as a political director for former State Assembly member Gene Mullin, as well as district director for former State Senator (now Congresswoman) Jackie Speier. He is a longtime supporter and advocate for public transportation. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Mullin is running for re-election to strengthen our democracy through elections reform.

    Assemblymember Mullin’s priorities for AD-22 this year include affordable housing, transportation infrastructure, climate change, and voting. He currently sits on five standing committees: Budget, Budget Subcommittee No. 3 on Resources and Transportation, Business and Professions, Elections and Redistricting, and Revenue and Taxation. Assemblymember Mullin has sponsored 36 bills about elections, transportation, and housing this year, of which nine have been successfully chaptered. He scores a lifetime score of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Mullin has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said he has also supported AB 1366, which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies. Considering he has accepted $3,000 from telecom giant AT&T, that is not surprising.

    Assemblymember Mullin is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups, such as California Teachers Association, NARAL Pro-Choice California, and several local elected officials. At this time, Assemblymember Mullin does not have any problematic endorsements. Republican challenger Gilham’s potential policies greatly outweighs Assemblymember Mullin’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Mullin is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 24th District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Marc Berman to keep AD-24 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 24th Assembly District includes San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Marc Berman has held this position since being elected in 2016. The most recent election results show 78.2 percent of AD-24 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 76.7 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Marc Berman led Republican challenger Peter Ohtaki by a margin of 53 percent. Berman’s campaign has raised $491,613 and is funded by police money, fossil fuel money, and corporate PACs. Ohtaki’s campaign has raised $1,800, has not committed to any of the pledges, and is funded entirely by individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Berman, a lawyer, is from Palo Alto. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he worked with the Silicon Valley Education Foundation to support efforts to close the achievement gap through STEM education in Silicon Valley. He later served as a Palo Alto City Councilmember, increasing the city’s financial transparency. He is a longtime supporter of increasing election accessibility and infrastructure. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Berman is running for re-election because he wants to use his long history of public service to continue to push California forward on election security and higher education accessibility.

    Assemblymember Berman’s priorities for AD-24 this year include election protections and transportation. He currently sits on five committees: Elections and Redistricting (chair), Governmental Organization, Insurance, Privacy and Consumer Protection, and Transportation. He also serves as chair for both the Select Committees on the Census and the Master Plan for Higher Education in California. Assemblymember Berman has sponsored 45 bills about elections, technology, education, and transportation this year, of which 17 have been successfully chaptered.

    He scores a lifetime score of 92 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Berman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to support AB 1505, which would empower local districts to evaluate charter-school applications based on economic-impact criteria. This is not surprising, considering he has accepted campaign money from California Charter Schools Association Advocates for Great Public Schools. Additionally, Assemblymember Berman voted to support AB 1366, which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies. He has also accepted campaign money from Verizon, one of the largest telecom providers.

    Assemblymember Berman is endorsed by several progressive groups in the district, such as Peninsula for Everyone, AFSCME California, and the California Labor Federation. However, the threat of Ohtaki’s potential policies greatly outweighs Berman’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember. Berman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Marc Berman

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Marc Berman to keep AD-24 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 24th Assembly District includes San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Marc Berman has held this position since being elected in 2016. The most recent election results show 78.2 percent of AD-24 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and 76.7 percent voted for Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Assemblymember Marc Berman led Republican challenger Peter Ohtaki by a margin of 53 percent. Berman’s campaign has raised $491,613 and is funded by police money, fossil fuel money, and corporate PACs. Ohtaki’s campaign has raised $1,800, has not committed to any of the pledges, and is funded entirely by individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Berman, a lawyer, is from Palo Alto. Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he worked with the Silicon Valley Education Foundation to support efforts to close the achievement gap through STEM education in Silicon Valley. He later served as a Palo Alto City Councilmember, increasing the city’s financial transparency. He is a longtime supporter of increasing election accessibility and infrastructure. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Berman is running for re-election because he wants to use his long history of public service to continue to push California forward on election security and higher education accessibility.

    Assemblymember Berman’s priorities for AD-24 this year include election protections and transportation. He currently sits on five committees: Elections and Redistricting (chair), Governmental Organization, Insurance, Privacy and Consumer Protection, and Transportation. He also serves as chair for both the Select Committees on the Census and the Master Plan for Higher Education in California. Assemblymember Berman has sponsored 45 bills about elections, technology, education, and transportation this year, of which 17 have been successfully chaptered.

    He scores a lifetime score of 92 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Berman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, he failed to support AB 1505, which would empower local districts to evaluate charter-school applications based on economic-impact criteria. This is not surprising, considering he has accepted campaign money from California Charter Schools Association Advocates for Great Public Schools. Additionally, Assemblymember Berman voted to support AB 1366, which would eliminate critical oversight of telecom companies. He has also accepted campaign money from Verizon, one of the largest telecom providers.

    Assemblymember Berman is endorsed by several progressive groups in the district, such as Peninsula for Everyone, AFSCME California, and the California Labor Federation. However, the threat of Ohtaki’s potential policies greatly outweighs Berman’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Assemblymember. Berman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 25th District

  • Democratic Socialist
  • Elect Alex Lee to push AD-25 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 25th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-25 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democratic challenger Alex Lee trailed Republican Challenger Bob Brunton by a margin of 5.4 percent. However, this is only due to the size of the Democratic primary field, where Democratic candidates outperformed Brunton by a margin of 79.2 percent. Alex Lee’s campaign has pledged not to take money from police or fossil fuel organizations. Brunton’s campaign has not committed to any such pledges, and he has been subject to legal complaints and penalties for campaign finance violations in 2014 and 2015.

    About the Candidate

    Alex Lee is from San Jose, CA, where he returned after completing undergraduate studies at UC Davis. According to campaign materials he is running for election to address the housing crisis, improve public transportation, achieve universal health care, and build ecologically sustainable communities.

    Alex Lee is a former legislative policy advisor for State Senator Henry Stern, where he worked on legislation addressing climate change, housing, and public education. If elected, he would be the youngest state legislator in nearly a century.

    Alex Lee is endorsed by many local progressive groups in the district and has been found to be true to his pledges to refuse money from problematic sources. According to our analysis, Alex Lee is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    About Courage California’s Endorsement

    After a comprehensive interview with Alex Lee, we have determined that he is committed to criminal justice reform, environmental justice, racial equity and justice, and immigrant rights. His experience in Sacramento and deep knowledge of his district, along with his pledges to refuse money from corporate PACs, police, and the fossil fuel industry are in alignment with the progressive future Courage California hopes to achieve in which special interests have no place in politics. One of the first policies he would champion as a state legislator in the 2021 session is regarding social housing, a time-tested housing solution in Europe and Asia wherein the public sector is responsible for building affordable housing, not for-profit developers. We are confident that he will co-govern in the interests of all Californians and actively fight for anti-racist legislation. Courage California is proud to endorse Alex Lee for AD-25.

    Alex Lee

    Elect Alex Lee to push AD-25 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 25th Assembly District includes parts of Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-25 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016, and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democratic challenger Alex Lee trailed Republican Challenger Bob Brunton by a margin of 5.4 percent. However, this is only due to the size of the Democratic primary field, where Democratic candidates outperformed Brunton by a margin of 79.2 percent. Alex Lee’s campaign has pledged not to take money from police or fossil fuel organizations. Brunton’s campaign has not committed to any such pledges, and he has been subject to legal complaints and penalties for campaign finance violations in 2014 and 2015.

    About the Candidate

    Alex Lee is from San Jose, CA, where he returned after completing undergraduate studies at UC Davis. According to campaign materials he is running for election to address the housing crisis, improve public transportation, achieve universal health care, and build ecologically sustainable communities.

    Alex Lee is a former legislative policy advisor for State Senator Henry Stern, where he worked on legislation addressing climate change, housing, and public education. If elected, he would be the youngest state legislator in nearly a century.

    Alex Lee is endorsed by many local progressive groups in the district and has been found to be true to his pledges to refuse money from problematic sources. According to our analysis, Alex Lee is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    About Courage California’s Endorsement

    After a comprehensive interview with Alex Lee, we have determined that he is committed to criminal justice reform, environmental justice, racial equity and justice, and immigrant rights. His experience in Sacramento and deep knowledge of his district, along with his pledges to refuse money from corporate PACs, police, and the fossil fuel industry are in alignment with the progressive future Courage California hopes to achieve in which special interests have no place in politics. One of the first policies he would champion as a state legislator in the 2021 session is regarding social housing, a time-tested housing solution in Europe and Asia wherein the public sector is responsible for building affordable housing, not for-profit developers. We are confident that he will co-govern in the interests of all Californians and actively fight for anti-racist legislation. Courage California is proud to endorse Alex Lee for AD-25.

    Last updated: 2020-10-28

State Assembly, 27th District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Ash Kalra to keep AD-27 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 27th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Clara County and the city of San Jose. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 77.8 percent of AD-27 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 74.1 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Kalra led Republican challenger G. Burt Lancaster by a margin of 51.4 percent. Kalra’s campaign has raised $381,896.30 and has pledged to refuse police money. At the same time, he has accepted money from the California Correctional Peace Officers Association and the Santa Clara County Probation Peace Officers Local 1587. His campaign has yet to pledge to refuse corporate PAC and fossil fuel money, and his campaign has accepted corporate PAC funding. Lancaster’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Ash Kalra has lived in San Jose for over 35 years. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2017. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election because as a longtime resident of San Jose, he is committed to improving the region’s environmental footprint and public safety.
    In the State Assembly, Kalra has been outspoken in his advocacy for clean energy and preserving public green spaces. He is the author of the bill that banned single-use plastic toiletries in California hotels, and introduced legislation to protect tropical forests. Kalra has also worked on social protections, authoring bills to eliminate high school exit exams, and protect DACA recipients in the state.

    Rep. Kalra’s priorities for AD-27 this year include being a champion for transit, safety, and the environment. He currently sits on five committees, including the committees on Aging and Long-Term Care, Labor and Employment, and Education. Rep. Kalra has co-sponsored five bills expanding housing, environmental protection, and justice reform this year. He scores a 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Kalra has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Kalra was an attorney with the Santa Clara County Public Defender’s Office, working primarily to provide drug offenders with the opportunity to complete rehabilitation programs. Kalra was elected to the San Jose City Council in 2008, where he worked to stimulate economic growth and improve the public transportation system.

    Rep. Kalra is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. He is also endorsed by police groups. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Lancaster’s potential policies greatly outweighs Kalra’s police backing and financing. According to our analysis, Rep. Kalra is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Ash Kalra

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Ash Kalra to keep AD-27 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 27th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Clara County and the city of San Jose. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 77.8 percent of AD-27 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 74.1 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Kalra led Republican challenger G. Burt Lancaster by a margin of 51.4 percent. Kalra’s campaign has raised $381,896.30 and has pledged to refuse police money. At the same time, he has accepted money from the California Correctional Peace Officers Association and the Santa Clara County Probation Peace Officers Local 1587. His campaign has yet to pledge to refuse corporate PAC and fossil fuel money, and his campaign has accepted corporate PAC funding. Lancaster’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Ash Kalra has lived in San Jose for over 35 years. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2017. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election because as a longtime resident of San Jose, he is committed to improving the region’s environmental footprint and public safety.
    In the State Assembly, Kalra has been outspoken in his advocacy for clean energy and preserving public green spaces. He is the author of the bill that banned single-use plastic toiletries in California hotels, and introduced legislation to protect tropical forests. Kalra has also worked on social protections, authoring bills to eliminate high school exit exams, and protect DACA recipients in the state.

    Rep. Kalra’s priorities for AD-27 this year include being a champion for transit, safety, and the environment. He currently sits on five committees, including the committees on Aging and Long-Term Care, Labor and Employment, and Education. Rep. Kalra has co-sponsored five bills expanding housing, environmental protection, and justice reform this year. He scores a 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Kalra has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to his election to the Assembly, Kalra was an attorney with the Santa Clara County Public Defender’s Office, working primarily to provide drug offenders with the opportunity to complete rehabilitation programs. Kalra was elected to the San Jose City Council in 2008, where he worked to stimulate economic growth and improve the public transportation system.

    Rep. Kalra is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. He is also endorsed by police groups. However, the threat of Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Lancaster’s potential policies greatly outweighs Kalra’s police backing and financing. According to our analysis, Rep. Kalra is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 29th District

  • Democrat
  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Mark Stone to keep AD-29 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 29th Assembly District includes parts of Monterey, Santa Cruz, and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 70 percent of AD-29 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 70.9 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Stone led Republican challenger Shomir Banerjee by a margin of 51.6 percent. Stone’s campaign has raised $163,718.50, has not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and has accepted funds from corporations and police groups. Individual donations comprise a large amount of Stone’s campaign finances. Banerjee’s campaign has raised $2,250.00 and has also not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Mark Stone lives in Scotts Valley. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2012. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election because he wants to continue to protect the most vulnerable Californians.

    In the State Assembly, Rep. Stone has led reform in criminal justice, youth and education, LGBTQIA+ rights, and the environment. Last year, his bill to eliminate copayments for medical and dental visits for incarcerated people became law, as well as a bill that allowed more incarcerated people to qualify to earn parole credits. He also introduced a Student Borrower’s Bill of Rights, and the Coastal Adaptation, Access, and Resilience Program (CAARP), to fund climate-adaptation projects. He currently chairs the Judiciary Committee.

    Rep. Stone’s priorities for AD-29 this year include child welfare, justice reform, and environmental protection. He currently sits on eight committees, and he chairs the Judiciary Committee. Rep. Stone has sponsored or cosponsored five bills supporting gun violence prevention legislation, consumer protection, and expanded medical leave this year. He scores a lifetime score of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Stone has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to election to the State Assembly, he served two terms on the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors.

    Rep. Stone is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, despite his lack of campaign finance pledges, Rep. Mark Stone is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Mark Stone

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Mark Stone to keep AD-29 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 29th Assembly District includes parts of Monterey, Santa Cruz, and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 70 percent of AD-29 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 70.9 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Stone led Republican challenger Shomir Banerjee by a margin of 51.6 percent. Stone’s campaign has raised $163,718.50, has not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and has accepted funds from corporations and police groups. Individual donations comprise a large amount of Stone’s campaign finances. Banerjee’s campaign has raised $2,250.00 and has also not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Mark Stone lives in Scotts Valley. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2012. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election because he wants to continue to protect the most vulnerable Californians.

    In the State Assembly, Rep. Stone has led reform in criminal justice, youth and education, LGBTQIA+ rights, and the environment. Last year, his bill to eliminate copayments for medical and dental visits for incarcerated people became law, as well as a bill that allowed more incarcerated people to qualify to earn parole credits. He also introduced a Student Borrower’s Bill of Rights, and the Coastal Adaptation, Access, and Resilience Program (CAARP), to fund climate-adaptation projects. He currently chairs the Judiciary Committee.

    Rep. Stone’s priorities for AD-29 this year include child welfare, justice reform, and environmental protection. He currently sits on eight committees, and he chairs the Judiciary Committee. Rep. Stone has sponsored or cosponsored five bills supporting gun violence prevention legislation, consumer protection, and expanded medical leave this year. He scores a lifetime score of 100 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Stone has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote.

    Prior to election to the State Assembly, he served two terms on the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors.

    Rep. Stone is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, despite his lack of campaign finance pledges, Rep. Mark Stone is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 30th District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Robert Rivas to keep AD-30 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 31st Assembly District includes all of San Benito County, as well as parts of Monterey, Santa Cruz, and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 66.7 percent of AD-30 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 64.5 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Rivas led Republican challenger Gregory Swett by a margin of 38.8 percent. Neither candidate has pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money. Rivas’s campaign has raised $477,985.86, including from corporate, fossil fuel, and police interest groups. Swett’s campaign has raised much less than Rivas’s, with $1,000, all from his private business.

    About the Candidate

    Robert Rivas is from Paicines and has lived in Hollister for most of his life. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2018. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to fight for the “resources local communities need and deserve.”

    In the State Assembly, he authored the landmark Farmworker Housing Act, which would allow surplus agricultural land to be rezoned for farmworker housing. He also co-authored the bill to fund the Golden State Teacher Grant Program. The program provides $20,000 in scholarship grants for recent college graduates who acquire a teaching credential in high-need fields, such as STEM or special education, and teach for four years in select schools.

    Rivas’s priorities for AD-30 this year include infrastructure improvements, affordable housing, and attracting more jobs. He currently sits on 13 committees and chairs the Joint Committee on Fairs Allocation and Classification. Assemblymember Rivas has co-sponsored three bills about environmental, consumer, and worker protection this year. He scores a lifetime score of 88 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Rivas has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Rivas has been absent from voting on key progressive legislation on worker protection and police accountability.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served on the San Benito County Board of Supervisors.

    Rep. Rivas is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Rivas is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Robert Rivas

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Robert Rivas to keep AD-30 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 31st Assembly District includes all of San Benito County, as well as parts of Monterey, Santa Cruz, and Santa Clara Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 66.7 percent of AD-30 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 64.5 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Rivas led Republican challenger Gregory Swett by a margin of 38.8 percent. Neither candidate has pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money. Rivas’s campaign has raised $477,985.86, including from corporate, fossil fuel, and police interest groups. Swett’s campaign has raised much less than Rivas’s, with $1,000, all from his private business.

    About the Candidate

    Robert Rivas is from Paicines and has lived in Hollister for most of his life. He is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2018. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to fight for the “resources local communities need and deserve.”

    In the State Assembly, he authored the landmark Farmworker Housing Act, which would allow surplus agricultural land to be rezoned for farmworker housing. He also co-authored the bill to fund the Golden State Teacher Grant Program. The program provides $20,000 in scholarship grants for recent college graduates who acquire a teaching credential in high-need fields, such as STEM or special education, and teach for four years in select schools.

    Rivas’s priorities for AD-30 this year include infrastructure improvements, affordable housing, and attracting more jobs. He currently sits on 13 committees and chairs the Joint Committee on Fairs Allocation and Classification. Assemblymember Rivas has co-sponsored three bills about environmental, consumer, and worker protection this year. He scores a lifetime score of 88 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Rivas has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Rivas has been absent from voting on key progressive legislation on worker protection and police accountability.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, he served on the San Benito County Board of Supervisors.

    Rep. Rivas is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Rivas is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 35th District

  • Democrat
  • Elect Dawn Addis to push AD-35 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 35th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Barbara County and all of San Luis Obispo County. The district has been held by Republicans and Democrats over the years, but has been red since 2012. The most recent election results show AD-35 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Addis trailed Republican incumbent Representative Jordan Cunningham by a margin of 13.6 percent. Addis’s campaign has raised $180,835.76, including significant contributions from trade unions and women’s groups. While she is not funded by corporate, fossil fuel, or police money, Addis has not committed to refusing police money. Opponent Cunningham’s campaign has raised $445,388. The majority of his donations are from individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Dawn Addis is from the Central Coast and has been working as a Morro Bay City Council member since 2018. According to campaign materials, Addis is running for election as assemblymember to improve health care and public education, reduce homelessness and housing costs, and to combat corruption.

    Addis has built a record of leadership as a Morro Bay Cith Council member, working to secure clean water, equal representation, and to protect the local workforce. Her record of community involvement includes co-founding the Women’s March in San Luis Obispo. As a result of her work, she was named 2017’s 24th Congressional District Woman of the Year by Congressmember Carbajal. She was invited to the State of the Union address in 2018 by him because of her record of advocacy on immigration issues. She is a bilingual public educator and taught special education before moving into program development.

    Addis is endorsed by many local progressive groups in the district, with the majority of endorsements coming from labor rights and women’s groups. Opponent Cunningham has received a number of problematic endorsements, including from police, pro-life, and gun-owner groups. While Addis is trailing in the polls, she can win this seat. According to our analysis, Dawn Addis is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Dawn Addis

    Elect Dawn Addis to push AD-35 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 35th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Barbara County and all of San Luis Obispo County. The district has been held by Republicans and Democrats over the years, but has been red since 2012. The most recent election results show AD-35 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Addis trailed Republican incumbent Representative Jordan Cunningham by a margin of 13.6 percent. Addis’s campaign has raised $180,835.76, including significant contributions from trade unions and women’s groups. While she is not funded by corporate, fossil fuel, or police money, Addis has not committed to refusing police money. Opponent Cunningham’s campaign has raised $445,388. The majority of his donations are from individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Dawn Addis is from the Central Coast and has been working as a Morro Bay City Council member since 2018. According to campaign materials, Addis is running for election as assemblymember to improve health care and public education, reduce homelessness and housing costs, and to combat corruption.

    Addis has built a record of leadership as a Morro Bay Cith Council member, working to secure clean water, equal representation, and to protect the local workforce. Her record of community involvement includes co-founding the Women’s March in San Luis Obispo. As a result of her work, she was named 2017’s 24th Congressional District Woman of the Year by Congressmember Carbajal. She was invited to the State of the Union address in 2018 by him because of her record of advocacy on immigration issues. She is a bilingual public educator and taught special education before moving into program development.

    Addis is endorsed by many local progressive groups in the district, with the majority of endorsements coming from labor rights and women’s groups. Opponent Cunningham has received a number of problematic endorsements, including from police, pro-life, and gun-owner groups. While Addis is trailing in the polls, she can win this seat. According to our analysis, Dawn Addis is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 37th District

  • Elect Steve Bennett to keep AD-37 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 37th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Barbara and Ventura  Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 64.3 percent of AD-37 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 64.6 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Steve Bennett trailed Republican candidate Charles Cole by a margin of 2.9 percent. Neither candidate has pledged to refuse to accept corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money. Bennett’s campaign has raised $376,949.78, mostly from individuals and some labor groups. Cole has raised $10,159.18, mostly from individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Steve Bennett, who is completing his fifth term as a Ventura County supervisor, has been a public servant for more than 20 years. He taught high school economics and American history, and then worked as a Ventura City Councilmember before being elected to the Ventura Board of Supervisors. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to stand up to powerful special interests to protect constituents’ quality of life, address climate change, and tackle homelessness.

    Bennet’s political career began in 1995, when he co-authored and fought for the SOAR (Save Open Space and Agricultural Resources) initiatives in Ventura County. It was the first move in the county to protect agricultural and open-space lands from development by requiring a vote of the people before those areas could be rezoned.

    Bennett is 1st District supervisor in Ventura County, where he has committed to resisting special interests in politics, supporting Ventura County’s vulnerable citizens, and protecting rural lands from development. As supervisor, he authored a bill that limited special-interest contributions to any campaign for local office to $750. He also worked on affordable housing, and initiated a number of programs to help farmworkers and seniors.

    Bennett is endorsed by a strong majority of local progressive groups and leaders in the district. Republican opponent Cole is endorsed by GOP groups and a gun store. In addition, he has virtually no government experience and does not believe in climate change, making him a poor choice for the district. According to our analysis, Steve Bennett is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Steve Bennett

    Elect Steve Bennett to keep AD-37 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 37th Assembly District includes parts of Santa Barbara and Ventura  Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 64.3 percent of AD-37 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 64.6 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Steve Bennett trailed Republican candidate Charles Cole by a margin of 2.9 percent. Neither candidate has pledged to refuse to accept corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money. Bennett’s campaign has raised $376,949.78, mostly from individuals and some labor groups. Cole has raised $10,159.18, mostly from individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Steve Bennett, who is completing his fifth term as a Ventura County supervisor, has been a public servant for more than 20 years. He taught high school economics and American history, and then worked as a Ventura City Councilmember before being elected to the Ventura Board of Supervisors. According to campaign materials, he is running for election to stand up to powerful special interests to protect constituents’ quality of life, address climate change, and tackle homelessness.

    Bennet’s political career began in 1995, when he co-authored and fought for the SOAR (Save Open Space and Agricultural Resources) initiatives in Ventura County. It was the first move in the county to protect agricultural and open-space lands from development by requiring a vote of the people before those areas could be rezoned.

    Bennett is 1st District supervisor in Ventura County, where he has committed to resisting special interests in politics, supporting Ventura County’s vulnerable citizens, and protecting rural lands from development. As supervisor, he authored a bill that limited special-interest contributions to any campaign for local office to $750. He also worked on affordable housing, and initiated a number of programs to help farmworkers and seniors.

    Bennett is endorsed by a strong majority of local progressive groups and leaders in the district. Republican opponent Cole is endorsed by GOP groups and a gun store. In addition, he has virtually no government experience and does not believe in climate change, making him a poor choice for the district. According to our analysis, Steve Bennett is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 39th District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Luz Maria Rivas to keep AD-39 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 39th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Mission Hills, Sunland-Tujunga, and Sylmar. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-39 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Rivas led Republican challenger Ricardo Benitez by a margin of 55.6 percent. Rivas’s campaign has raised $333,608.51, with labor organizations comprising much of her donor base. Rivas is not funded by fossil fuel money, but she has accepted police and corporate money. Benitez’s campaign has raised $1,454.59 from just two individuals and a Republican organization, and has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Rivas is from Northeast San Fernando Valley, and returned to Los Angeles after completing her master’s in education at Harvard University. She is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2018. According to campaign materials, Rep. Rivas is running for re-election to advocate for economic empowerment, independence, and self-efficacy.

    In the Assembly, Rivas has worked on legislation to address California’s homeless student crisis, to ensure that post-secondary schools cannot refuse transcripts because of a student’s debt, and has authored the Share Our Values Film Tax, which would give tax credits to companies that decide to film in California instead of a state that have enacted anti-abortion legislation.

    Prior to serving in the Assembly, Assemblymember Rivas was an electrical engineer and an educator, and strongly believes that an education in a STEM field can create opportunity and empower all people, particularly women and girls. She founded a nonprofit, DIY Girls, which teaches engineering and design skills, and was also appointed to the Los Angeles Board of Public Works in 2016.

    Rivas has a lifetime score of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on this analysis, Assemblymember Rivas has consistently shown great courage and has advocated for the needs of constituents while facing down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. She has demonstrated her progressive values in her commitment to equity, education, and supporting marginalized populations in her community.

    Assemblymember Rivas is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also endorsed by two police groups. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Rivas is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Luz Maria Rivas

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Luz Maria Rivas to keep AD-39 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 39th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Mission Hills, Sunland-Tujunga, and Sylmar. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-39 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Rivas led Republican challenger Ricardo Benitez by a margin of 55.6 percent. Rivas’s campaign has raised $333,608.51, with labor organizations comprising much of her donor base. Rivas is not funded by fossil fuel money, but she has accepted police and corporate money. Benitez’s campaign has raised $1,454.59 from just two individuals and a Republican organization, and has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Rivas is from Northeast San Fernando Valley, and returned to Los Angeles after completing her master’s in education at Harvard University. She is the incumbent, having served in this position since 2018. According to campaign materials, Rep. Rivas is running for re-election to advocate for economic empowerment, independence, and self-efficacy.

    In the Assembly, Rivas has worked on legislation to address California’s homeless student crisis, to ensure that post-secondary schools cannot refuse transcripts because of a student’s debt, and has authored the Share Our Values Film Tax, which would give tax credits to companies that decide to film in California instead of a state that have enacted anti-abortion legislation.

    Prior to serving in the Assembly, Assemblymember Rivas was an electrical engineer and an educator, and strongly believes that an education in a STEM field can create opportunity and empower all people, particularly women and girls. She founded a nonprofit, DIY Girls, which teaches engineering and design skills, and was also appointed to the Los Angeles Board of Public Works in 2016.

    Rivas has a lifetime score of 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on this analysis, Assemblymember Rivas has consistently shown great courage and has advocated for the needs of constituents while facing down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. She has demonstrated her progressive values in her commitment to equity, education, and supporting marginalized populations in her community.

    Assemblymember Rivas is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also endorsed by two police groups. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Rivas is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 41st District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Chris Holden to keep AD-41 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 41st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Democrats typically hold this district, and Holden has held this seat since 2012. The most recent election results show AD-41 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Holden led Republican challenger Robin Hvidston by a margin of 37.4 percent. Holden’s campaign has raised $490,608.45. His campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and he has received funding from all three types of groups. Hvidston’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Chris Holden is a lifelong resident of Pasadena. He is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 41st District in the State Assembly since 2012. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to find solutions that create and protect jobs, preserve vital services, and strengthen the economic vitality of the San Gabriel Valley.

    As an assemblymember, Holden has authored and led the passage of several bills to support small businesses and innovation, save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Holden currently chairs the Assembly Committee on Utilities and Energy.

    Assemblymember Holden’s priorities for AD-41 this year include creating jobs and a strong economy, investing in quality education for children, improving transportation and infrastructure, and preserving natural resources. Holden scores a lifetime 93 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Holden has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Holden has supported legislation to eliminate oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Chris Holden served as a Pasadena City Councilmember and then as Pasadena City mayor. He has served Pasadena as councilmember the second-longest. Holden is a graduate of Pasadena High School and San Diego State University. In this position, Holden authored and pushed the passage of several bills, including legislation that expanded California’s small-business loan-guarantee program and reduced fees at UCs and CSUs by up to 40 percent for middle-class families.

    Assemblymember Holden is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. The threat of anti-immigrant Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Hvidston’s potential policies greatly outweighs Holden’s less-than-ideal campaign financing. According to our analysis, Rep. Holden is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Chris Holden

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Chris Holden to keep AD-41 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 41st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Democrats typically hold this district, and Holden has held this seat since 2012. The most recent election results show AD-41 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Holden led Republican challenger Robin Hvidston by a margin of 37.4 percent. Holden’s campaign has raised $490,608.45. His campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and he has received funding from all three types of groups. Hvidston’s campaign has not made any FEC filings.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Chris Holden is a lifelong resident of Pasadena. He is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 41st District in the State Assembly since 2012. According to campaign materials, he is running for re-election to continue to find solutions that create and protect jobs, preserve vital services, and strengthen the economic vitality of the San Gabriel Valley.

    As an assemblymember, Holden has authored and led the passage of several bills to support small businesses and innovation, save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Holden currently chairs the Assembly Committee on Utilities and Energy.

    Assemblymember Holden’s priorities for AD-41 this year include creating jobs and a strong economy, investing in quality education for children, improving transportation and infrastructure, and preserving natural resources. Holden scores a lifetime 93 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Holden has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Holden has supported legislation to eliminate oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Chris Holden served as a Pasadena City Councilmember and then as Pasadena City mayor. He has served Pasadena as councilmember the second-longest. Holden is a graduate of Pasadena High School and San Diego State University. In this position, Holden authored and pushed the passage of several bills, including legislation that expanded California’s small-business loan-guarantee program and reduced fees at UCs and CSUs by up to 40 percent for middle-class families.

    Assemblymember Holden is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. The threat of anti-immigrant Republican challenger and strong Trump supporter Hvidston’s potential policies greatly outweighs Holden’s less-than-ideal campaign financing. According to our analysis, Rep. Holden is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 43rd District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Laura Friedman to keep AD-43 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Glendale, Burbank, La Cañada Flintridge, and La Crescenta-Montrose. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-43 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Laura Friedman led Republican challenger Mike Graves by a margin of 54.9 percent. Friedman’s campaign has raised $408,291.69 and is not funded by fossil fuel money, although Sempra Energy, which is not on the No Fossil Fuel pledge list, thus technically not breaking her pledge, has contributed to her campaign. Friedman’s campaign has also accepted police and corporation money. No FEC filings have been made about opponent Graves’s campaign’s funding.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Laura Friedman is a longtime Glendale resident. She is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 43rd District in the State Assembly since 2016. According to campaign materials, she is running for re-election to continue her work to raise the minimum wage, protect the environment, and advocate for universal health care and affordable housing.

    As an assemblymember, Friedman has authored and led the passage of several bills related to small business and innovation, and has worked to save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Friedman currently serves as chair of the Assembly Committee on Natural Resources, which covers air quality, climate change, renewable energy, coastal protection, and other environmental issues. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she served seven years on the Glendale City Council, including a term as the mayor of Glendale.

    Assemblymember Friedman’s priorities for AD-43 this year include protecting vulnerable Californians, advocating for better and more efficient mass transit options, and combating the climate crisis. She has a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation that would increase oversight of telecommunications companies.

    During her first term as assemblymember, Friedman authored a package of bills to institute landmark water-efficiency standards, strengthen environmental sustainability, and expand access to higher education, health care, and transportation alternatives. She is a longtime supporter of environmental causes.

    Assemblymember Friedman is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Friedman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Laura Friedman

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Laura Friedman to keep AD-43 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a four-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 43rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes the cities of Glendale, Burbank, La Cañada Flintridge, and La Crescenta-Montrose. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-43 voted for Clinton for president in 2016 and Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Laura Friedman led Republican challenger Mike Graves by a margin of 54.9 percent. Friedman’s campaign has raised $408,291.69 and is not funded by fossil fuel money, although Sempra Energy, which is not on the No Fossil Fuel pledge list, thus technically not breaking her pledge, has contributed to her campaign. Friedman’s campaign has also accepted police and corporation money. No FEC filings have been made about opponent Graves’s campaign’s funding.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Laura Friedman is a longtime Glendale resident. She is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 43rd District in the State Assembly since 2016. According to campaign materials, she is running for re-election to continue her work to raise the minimum wage, protect the environment, and advocate for universal health care and affordable housing.

    As an assemblymember, Friedman has authored and led the passage of several bills related to small business and innovation, and has worked to save developmental disability services, protect public health, and preserve civil rights. Assemblymember Friedman currently serves as chair of the Assembly Committee on Natural Resources, which covers air quality, climate change, renewable energy, coastal protection, and other environmental issues. Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she served seven years on the Glendale City Council, including a term as the mayor of Glendale.

    Assemblymember Friedman’s priorities for AD-43 this year include protecting vulnerable Californians, advocating for better and more efficient mass transit options, and combating the climate crisis. She has a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Assemblymember Friedman has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation that would increase oversight of telecommunications companies.

    During her first term as assemblymember, Friedman authored a package of bills to institute landmark water-efficiency standards, strengthen environmental sustainability, and expand access to higher education, health care, and transportation alternatives. She is a longtime supporter of environmental causes.

    Assemblymember Friedman is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Friedman is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 47th District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Eloise Gómez Reyes to keep AD-47 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 47th Assembly District includes parts of San Bernardino County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 70.1 percent of AD-47 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 67.4 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Reyes led Republican challenger Matthew Gordon by a margin of 42 percent. Neither candidate has pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police money. Reyes’s campaign has raised $464,982.45 and is funded by labor unions and individuals, but also by corporations, fossil fuel, and police money. Opponent Gordon’s campaign has raised $7,301.68 is backed mostly by individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Eloise Gómez Reyes grew up in the San Bernardino Valley and lives in Grand Terrace, CA. She is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 47th District in the State Assembly since 2016.

    During her tenure, Assemblymember Reyes has been committed to the progressive values of her community, securing millions in funding for higher education, health care, and other community services. She has worked with progressive organizations to pass legislation across nearly every progressive issue area, from criminal-justice reform to strengthening worker protections to protecting the environment. She currently sits on sixteen committees, and serves as chair of the Human Services Committee and the Select Committee on Environmental Quality, and the Green Economy in the Inland Empire.

    Rep. Reyes’s priorities for AD-47 this year include a clean economy, gun violence protection, and making higher education affordable. Rep. Reyes has sponsored two bills about environmental and worker protection this year, both of which successfully passed. She scores a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Reyes has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she was absent from a vote that would allow local governments to sponsor public banks. Such banks are likely to charge lower fees and invest in locally oriented resources.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she taught as an adjunct professor at Cal Poly Pomona, provided free legal aid to residents of the Inland Empire, and co-founded the Inland Empire Community Health Center. She was also the first Latina to open her own law firm in the Inland Empire, where she successfully represented the residents of Colton in their effort to prevent the development of a hazardous-waste dump in their community.

    Rep. Reyes is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Rep. Eloise Gómez Reyes is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Eloise Gómez Reyes

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Eloise Gómez Reyes to keep AD-47 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 47th Assembly District includes parts of San Bernardino County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 70.1 percent of AD-47 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 67.4 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Reyes led Republican challenger Matthew Gordon by a margin of 42 percent. Neither candidate has pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police money. Reyes’s campaign has raised $464,982.45 and is funded by labor unions and individuals, but also by corporations, fossil fuel, and police money. Opponent Gordon’s campaign has raised $7,301.68 is backed mostly by individuals.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Eloise Gómez Reyes grew up in the San Bernardino Valley and lives in Grand Terrace, CA. She is the incumbent, having served as assemblymember for the 47th District in the State Assembly since 2016.

    During her tenure, Assemblymember Reyes has been committed to the progressive values of her community, securing millions in funding for higher education, health care, and other community services. She has worked with progressive organizations to pass legislation across nearly every progressive issue area, from criminal-justice reform to strengthening worker protections to protecting the environment. She currently sits on sixteen committees, and serves as chair of the Human Services Committee and the Select Committee on Environmental Quality, and the Green Economy in the Inland Empire.

    Rep. Reyes’s priorities for AD-47 this year include a clean economy, gun violence protection, and making higher education affordable. Rep. Reyes has sponsored two bills about environmental and worker protection this year, both of which successfully passed. She scores a lifetime score of 98 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Reyes has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she was absent from a vote that would allow local governments to sponsor public banks. Such banks are likely to charge lower fees and invest in locally oriented resources.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, she taught as an adjunct professor at Cal Poly Pomona, provided free legal aid to residents of the Inland Empire, and co-founded the Inland Empire Community Health Center. She was also the first Latina to open her own law firm in the Inland Empire, where she successfully represented the residents of Colton in their effort to prevent the development of a hazardous-waste dump in their community.

    Rep. Reyes is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Rep. Eloise Gómez Reyes is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-21

State Assembly, 51st District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo to keep AD-51 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County, and includes East Los Angeles and the neighborhoods of Lincoln Heights, Eagle Rock, and Chinatown. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show that 85 percent of AD-51 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 85.9 percent voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    Since the primary, Wendy Carrillo stands unchallenged in this election after she won 86.6 percent of the vote in the primaries. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $438,703.55. She has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money and has accepted funds from all three groups.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is from El Salvador and moved to the Boyle Heights neighborhood in 1985. She has lived in Los Angeles ever since, and first won her seat in 2017. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Carrillo is running for re-election to fight for opportunity, equality, and fairness.

    Assemblymember Carrillo’s priorities for AD-51 this year include improving access to quality education and health care, creating economic opportunity, and providing affordable housing. In the Assembly, Carrillo serves on nineteen committees, including Select Committees on Ending the School to Prison Pipeline and Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California. She was recently a co-author of AB 1482, which protects renters from unjust evictions and unreasonable rent increases, and was signed into law in 2019. This year, Carrillo has co-sponsored three bills expanding access to affordable housing and providing medical leave protection for workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. She scores a lifetime score of 90 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation providing oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assemblymember Carrillo was an award-winning journalist, writer, and producer. For ten years, she hosted a community-based radio program on Los Angeles Power 106 fm, discussing issues around access to higher education, environmental justice, and political transparency. More recently, she co-founded Reported.ly, an award-winning social media start-up covering human rights, global conflict, and social movements. She is a longtime supporter of labor rights, health care for all, and better conditions for caregivers.

    Rep. Carrillo is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Wendy Carrillo

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo to keep AD-51 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 51st Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County, and includes East Los Angeles and the neighborhoods of Lincoln Heights, Eagle Rock, and Chinatown. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show that 85 percent of AD-51 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 85.9 percent voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    Since the primary, Wendy Carrillo stands unchallenged in this election after she won 86.6 percent of the vote in the primaries. Carrillo’s campaign has raised $438,703.55. She has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money and has accepted funds from all three groups.

    About the Candidate

    Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is from El Salvador and moved to the Boyle Heights neighborhood in 1985. She has lived in Los Angeles ever since, and first won her seat in 2017. According to campaign materials, Assemblymember Carrillo is running for re-election to fight for opportunity, equality, and fairness.

    Assemblymember Carrillo’s priorities for AD-51 this year include improving access to quality education and health care, creating economic opportunity, and providing affordable housing. In the Assembly, Carrillo serves on nineteen committees, including Select Committees on Ending the School to Prison Pipeline and Uplifting Girls and Women of Color in California. She was recently a co-author of AB 1482, which protects renters from unjust evictions and unreasonable rent increases, and was signed into law in 2019. This year, Carrillo has co-sponsored three bills expanding access to affordable housing and providing medical leave protection for workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. She scores a lifetime score of 90 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Carrillo has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, she has not supported legislation providing oversight of telecommunications companies.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Assemblymember Carrillo was an award-winning journalist, writer, and producer. For ten years, she hosted a community-based radio program on Los Angeles Power 106 fm, discussing issues around access to higher education, environmental justice, and political transparency. More recently, she co-founded Reported.ly, an award-winning social media start-up covering human rights, global conflict, and social movements. She is a longtime supporter of labor rights, health care for all, and better conditions for caregivers.

    Rep. Carrillo is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. According to our analysis, Assemblymember Wendy Carrillo is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-22

State Assembly, 54th District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Sydney Kamlager-Dove to keep AD-54 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent ,and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-54 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Sydney Kamlager-Dove led Democratic challenger Tracy Bernard Jones by a margin of 26.9 percent. Rep. Kamlager-Dove’s campaign has raised $456,755 and has not committed to any campaign finance pledges. Jones’s campaign has not filed any apparent campaign finance records with the California Secretary of State and has not committed to any pledges.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove, former district director for California State Senator and Courage California Endorsee Holly J. Mitchell, is from Chicago, IL, and has lived in Los Angeles since 1990. According to campaign materials, Rep. Kamlager-Dove is running for re-election to fight for more equitable and innovative neighborhoods.

    Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove’s priorities for AD-54 this year include gun violence prevention, further developing her free preschool initiative, and reducing packaging waste. She currently sits on six committees: the Rules (State Assembly and Legislature), Communications and Conveyance, Insurance, Public Safety, and Arts/Entertainment/Sports/Tourism/Internet Media Committees. Rep. Kamlager-Dove has sponsored 235 bills on such topics as prohibiting no-rehire provisions, banning biometric surveillance in police body cameras, and prohibiting the state from charging admin fees to inmates seeking medical care this year, of which over 10 percent have successfully passed. She scores a lifetime 88 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Kamlager-Dove has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Kamlager-Dove has not supported funding public banks, equalizing out-of-pocket emergency health-care costs regardless of insurance coverage, and preventing dialysis companies from redirecting patients away from Medi-Cal. She has accepted $11,400 from DaVita Inc., a private company that commands 37 percent of the dialysis market.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove first worked for the Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC) in Venice, CA. In 2010, she worked on Courage California Endorsee Holly J. Mitchell’s State Assembly campaign, becoming district director after Mitchell’s victory. In 2015, Kamlager-Dove was elected to the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees, and in 2018, she entered the California State Assembly, winning the special election resulting from Sebastian Ridley-Thomas’s resignation. She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from USC, a master’s in arts management from Carnegie Mellon, sits on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and is a longtime supporter of recognizing and quashing racial and economic biases in the administration of California’s public services.

    Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also backed by the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, California Association of Realtors, California Apartment Association, and the aforementioned DaVita Inc. However, we judge that her legislative accomplishments thus far outweigh her occasionally moderate voting record and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Sydney Kamlager-Dove

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Sydney Kamlager-Dove to keep AD-54 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent ,and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 54th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-54 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Sydney Kamlager-Dove led Democratic challenger Tracy Bernard Jones by a margin of 26.9 percent. Rep. Kamlager-Dove’s campaign has raised $456,755 and has not committed to any campaign finance pledges. Jones’s campaign has not filed any apparent campaign finance records with the California Secretary of State and has not committed to any pledges.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove, former district director for California State Senator and Courage California Endorsee Holly J. Mitchell, is from Chicago, IL, and has lived in Los Angeles since 1990. According to campaign materials, Rep. Kamlager-Dove is running for re-election to fight for more equitable and innovative neighborhoods.

    Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove’s priorities for AD-54 this year include gun violence prevention, further developing her free preschool initiative, and reducing packaging waste. She currently sits on six committees: the Rules (State Assembly and Legislature), Communications and Conveyance, Insurance, Public Safety, and Arts/Entertainment/Sports/Tourism/Internet Media Committees. Rep. Kamlager-Dove has sponsored 235 bills on such topics as prohibiting no-rehire provisions, banning biometric surveillance in police body cameras, and prohibiting the state from charging admin fees to inmates seeking medical care this year, of which over 10 percent have successfully passed. She scores a lifetime 88 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Kamlager-Dove has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, Rep. Kamlager-Dove has not supported funding public banks, equalizing out-of-pocket emergency health-care costs regardless of insurance coverage, and preventing dialysis companies from redirecting patients away from Medi-Cal. She has accepted $11,400 from DaVita Inc., a private company that commands 37 percent of the dialysis market.

    Prior to her election to the State Assembly, Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove first worked for the Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC) in Venice, CA. In 2010, she worked on Courage California Endorsee Holly J. Mitchell’s State Assembly campaign, becoming district director after Mitchell’s victory. In 2015, Kamlager-Dove was elected to the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees, and in 2018, she entered the California State Assembly, winning the special election resulting from Sebastian Ridley-Thomas’s resignation. She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from USC, a master’s in arts management from Carnegie Mellon, sits on the board of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, and is a longtime supporter of recognizing and quashing racial and economic biases in the administration of California’s public services.

    Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. She is also backed by the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, California Association of Realtors, California Apartment Association, and the aforementioned DaVita Inc. However, we judge that her legislative accomplishments thus far outweigh her occasionally moderate voting record and lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Sydney Kamlager-Dove is the strongest choice for representative leadership in office.

    Last updated: 2020-10-22

State Assembly, 55th District

  • Elect State Assemblymember Andrew Rodriguez to push AD-55 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Bernardino Counties. Republicans typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 49.9 percent of AD-55 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 52.1 percent of the district voted for Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Representative Rodriguez trailed Republican challenger Phillip Chen by a margin of 12.4 percent. Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $559,650.25. His campaign has not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police money, and has accepted funds from a police group. Opponent Chen’s campaign has raised $774,814.84 and has also not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police money. Some of Chen’s biggest donors are police and corporate PACs.

    About the Candidate

    Andrew Rodriguez is a lifelong resident of the City of Walnut and the 55th State Assembly District. According to campaign materials, he is running for the position to be an accessible, transparent, and effective representative for his community in Sacramento.

    Rodriguez is mayor pro tem of the city of Walnut. In this position, he has advocated for more housing in the district and smart growth strategies for the city, and he completed a general plan land-use update for the city for the first time in forty years. He has also worked as a land-use planner in the San Gabriel Valley and on several political campaigns, including then Newark Mayor Cory Booker’s successful U.S. Senate bid.

    Rodriguez’s priorities for AD-55 this year include strengthening public education, expanding economic opportunity, and addressing housing and homelessness.

    When he was sworn in as mayor of Walnut, Rodriguez was the youngest councilmember serving in Los Angeles County. During his term, Andrew and the city council have balanced the city's budget annually, and have worked to make Walnut one of the safest cities in California. In 2019, Walnut was ranked as one of the financially healthiest cities in California by the State Controller's Office.

    Andrew Rodriguez is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. Assemblymember Chen has shown that he does not represent the needs of constituents in facing down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. According to our analysis, Andrew Rodriguez is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Andrew Rodriguez

    Elect State Assemblymember Andrew Rodriguez to push AD-55 in the right direction.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 55th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Bernardino Counties. Republicans typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 49.9 percent of AD-55 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 52.1 percent of the district voted for Cox for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat challenger Representative Rodriguez trailed Republican challenger Phillip Chen by a margin of 12.4 percent. Rodriguez’s campaign has raised $559,650.25. His campaign has not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police money, and has accepted funds from a police group. Opponent Chen’s campaign has raised $774,814.84 and has also not pledged to refuse corporate PAC, fossil fuel, and police money. Some of Chen’s biggest donors are police and corporate PACs.

    About the Candidate

    Andrew Rodriguez is a lifelong resident of the City of Walnut and the 55th State Assembly District. According to campaign materials, he is running for the position to be an accessible, transparent, and effective representative for his community in Sacramento.

    Rodriguez is mayor pro tem of the city of Walnut. In this position, he has advocated for more housing in the district and smart growth strategies for the city, and he completed a general plan land-use update for the city for the first time in forty years. He has also worked as a land-use planner in the San Gabriel Valley and on several political campaigns, including then Newark Mayor Cory Booker’s successful U.S. Senate bid.

    Rodriguez’s priorities for AD-55 this year include strengthening public education, expanding economic opportunity, and addressing housing and homelessness.

    When he was sworn in as mayor of Walnut, Rodriguez was the youngest councilmember serving in Los Angeles County. During his term, Andrew and the city council have balanced the city's budget annually, and have worked to make Walnut one of the safest cities in California. In 2019, Walnut was ranked as one of the financially healthiest cities in California by the State Controller's Office.

    Andrew Rodriguez is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. Assemblymember Chen has shown that he does not represent the needs of constituents in facing down corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians. According to our analysis, Andrew Rodriguez is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

     

    Last updated: 2020-10-22

State Assembly, 59th District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-59 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 59th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-59 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Reggie Jones-Sawyer trailed Democratic challenger Efren Martinez by a margin of 5.7 percent. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $1,210,039 and has not committed to any campaign finance pledges. Martinez’s campaign has raised $492,225, not committed to any pledges, and is endorsed by the Peace Officer Research Association of California. In a 2017 Los Angeles Times article, Martinez was connected to Huntington Park councilwoman Karina Macias, who has been accused of multiple ethics violations, having rewarded donors with political favors. Martinez paid commissions to Macias as a fundraiser for prospective campaigns in 2012 and 2016. On both occasions, Martinez did not use the money raised to run for office.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer, a former labor organizer and lifelong public servant, is from Little Rock, AR, and has lived in South Los Angeles for many decades. According to campaign materials, Rep. Jones-Sawyer is running for re-election to further expand public services and continue serving working-class families in the district he has long called home.

    Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-59 this year include fighting mass incarceration and police brutality, supporting renters’ and immigrants’ rights, and continuing to push his introduced legislation for free public college. He currently sits on five committees: the Public Safety (chair), Agriculture, Budget, Governmental Organization, and Labor and Employment Committees. Rep. Jones-Sawyer sponsored 242 bills on such topics as expanding public housing, eliminating admin fees for inmates seeking medical care, and tightening regulations on the use of deadly force by police this year, of which over 10 percent have successfully passed. He scores a lifetime 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Jones-Sawyer supported nearly all progressive bills that made it to a vote during the 2019–2020 legislative year, abstaining from only one vote, requiring debt collectors to leave a final $1,724 in a bank account.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer was the vice president of SEIU's (Local 721) Los Angeles Professional Managers Association, and has served as director of Asset Management for the City of Los Angeles, assistant deputy mayor for the City of Los Angeles, chair of the Los Angeles County Small Business Commission, and statewide secretary of the California Democratic Party. His legislative accomplishments include securing nearly $100 million in grants to assist formerly incarcerated people in acquiring employment and education, prohibiting criminal records from being used as the basis for housing decisions, and prioritizing funding campus intervention workers, counselors, and other mental-health professionals over campus police. Jones-Sawyer is a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus, serving as chair from 2015–2016, and is a longtime supporter of immigrants’ rights, recidivism prevention through rehabilitation, and empowering social workers and other public servants.

    Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. He is also backed by the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, PG&E, and the California Apartment Association. However, the threat of the extremely pro–law enforcement Efren Martinez’s potential policies greatly outweighs Jones-Sawyer’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    About Courage California’s Endorsement

    After a comprehensive interview with Reggie Jones-Sawyer, we have determined that he is committed to criminal justice reform, environmental justice, racial equity and justice, and immigrant rights. His track record as the founder and Chair of the California Progressive Caucus demonstrates his dedication to advancing progressive legislation. Jones-Sawyer announced he is no longer taking any more money from big tobacco, oil, and police money. He recently gave $4,700 back to the CA Correctional Supervisors Organization. One of the first policies Jones-Sawyer said he will champion in the 2021 legislative session is passing a statewide law around police decertification. Courage California is proud to endorse Reggie Jones-Sawyer for AD-59.

    Reginald Jones-Sawyer

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Reginald Jones-Sawyer to keep AD-59 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 59th Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles Counties. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show AD-59 voted for Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 and Gavin Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Reggie Jones-Sawyer trailed Democratic challenger Efren Martinez by a margin of 5.7 percent. Jones-Sawyer’s campaign has raised $1,210,039 and has not committed to any campaign finance pledges. Martinez’s campaign has raised $492,225, not committed to any pledges, and is endorsed by the Peace Officer Research Association of California. In a 2017 Los Angeles Times article, Martinez was connected to Huntington Park councilwoman Karina Macias, who has been accused of multiple ethics violations, having rewarded donors with political favors. Martinez paid commissions to Macias as a fundraiser for prospective campaigns in 2012 and 2016. On both occasions, Martinez did not use the money raised to run for office.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer, a former labor organizer and lifelong public servant, is from Little Rock, AR, and has lived in South Los Angeles for many decades. According to campaign materials, Rep. Jones-Sawyer is running for re-election to further expand public services and continue serving working-class families in the district he has long called home.

    Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer’s priorities for AD-59 this year include fighting mass incarceration and police brutality, supporting renters’ and immigrants’ rights, and continuing to push his introduced legislation for free public college. He currently sits on five committees: the Public Safety (chair), Agriculture, Budget, Governmental Organization, and Labor and Employment Committees. Rep. Jones-Sawyer sponsored 242 bills on such topics as expanding public housing, eliminating admin fees for inmates seeking medical care, and tightening regulations on the use of deadly force by police this year, of which over 10 percent have successfully passed. He scores a lifetime 95 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Jones-Sawyer supported nearly all progressive bills that made it to a vote during the 2019–2020 legislative year, abstaining from only one vote, requiring debt collectors to leave a final $1,724 in a bank account.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer was the vice president of SEIU's (Local 721) Los Angeles Professional Managers Association, and has served as director of Asset Management for the City of Los Angeles, assistant deputy mayor for the City of Los Angeles, chair of the Los Angeles County Small Business Commission, and statewide secretary of the California Democratic Party. His legislative accomplishments include securing nearly $100 million in grants to assist formerly incarcerated people in acquiring employment and education, prohibiting criminal records from being used as the basis for housing decisions, and prioritizing funding campus intervention workers, counselors, and other mental-health professionals over campus police. Jones-Sawyer is a member of the California Legislative Black Caucus, serving as chair from 2015–2016, and is a longtime supporter of immigrants’ rights, recidivism prevention through rehabilitation, and empowering social workers and other public servants.

    Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer is endorsed by a strong majority of progressive groups in the district. He is also backed by the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, PG&E, and the California Apartment Association. However, the threat of the extremely pro–law enforcement Efren Martinez’s potential policies greatly outweighs Jones-Sawyer’s lack of campaign finance pledges. According to our analysis, Rep. Reggie Jones-Sawyer is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office.

    About Courage California’s Endorsement

    After a comprehensive interview with Reggie Jones-Sawyer, we have determined that he is committed to criminal justice reform, environmental justice, racial equity and justice, and immigrant rights. His track record as the founder and Chair of the California Progressive Caucus demonstrates his dedication to advancing progressive legislation. Jones-Sawyer announced he is no longer taking any more money from big tobacco, oil, and police money. He recently gave $4,700 back to the CA Correctional Supervisors Organization. One of the first policies Jones-Sawyer said he will champion in the 2021 legislative session is passing a statewide law around police decertification. Courage California is proud to endorse Reggie Jones-Sawyer for AD-59.

    Last updated: 2020-10-28

State Assembly, 63rd District

  • Re-elect State Assemblymember Anthony Rendón to keep AD-63 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 63rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes Bell Gardens and parts of Long Beach. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 77.4 percent of AD-63 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 74.6 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Anthony Rendón led another Democratic challenger Maria Estrada by a margin of 16 percent. Rendón’s campaign has raised $1,343,191.78. His campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and is funded by all three groups. Estrada’s campaign has raised $27,581.76, the bulk of which comes from individual donors. While her campaign has not taken corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, Estrada has yet to pledge to refuse such funds.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Anthony Rendón, assemblymember since 2012 and speaker of the California State Assembly since 2016, is the son of working-class parents and grandson of Mexican immigrants.

    He currently sits on the Arts Committee and the Rules Committee. As assemblymember, Rendón has passed key progressive legislation, including on environmental protections, gun violence prevention, affordable housing, and minimum wage.

    He scores a lifetime score of 97 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Anthony Rendón has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, in 2017 Rep. Rendón used his power as speaker to sideline legislation that would have established single-payer health care in California after receiving $100,000 from pharmaceutical groups and $50,000 from medical insurance groups, so his Courage Score is misleading.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Rendón served as executive director of Plaza de la Raza Child Development Services, which provides child development, social, and medical services to families in Los Angeles County. He is a longtime supporter of child education.

    Anthony Rendón is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. He is also endorsed by several police organizations. Although we disagree with Rendón’s ties to corporate, fossil fuel, and police interests, and know that a stronger progressive candidate would more accurately represent SD-15, Rendón is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office. That said, we encourage more progressive candidates that will better reflect this community’s needs to run formidable campaigns in future cycles.

    Anthony Rendón

    Re-elect State Assemblymember Anthony Rendón to keep AD-63 on the right track.

    About the Position

    State Assembly Members form part of the California State Legislature, and work alongside the governor to establish laws and a state budget. They hold the power to pass bills that affect public policy, set state spending levels, raise and lower taxes, and uphold or override the governor’s vetoes. The California State Assembly has 80 districts. Each represents a population of at least 465,000 Californians. Representatives are elected to the Assembly for a two-year term. Every two years, all 80 seats are subject to election. Members elected before 2012 are restricted to three two-year terms (six years) in the Assembly. Those elected in or after 2012 are allowed to serve 12 years total across both the State Senate and Assembly. This term, Democrats currently hold a two-thirds supermajority of 61 seats in the California State Assembly, while Republicans hold 17 seats. One seat is held by an Independent, and one seat is currently vacant.

    About the District

    California's 63rd Assembly District includes parts of Los Angeles County and includes Bell Gardens and parts of Long Beach. Democrats typically hold this district. The most recent election results show 77.4 percent of AD-63 voted for Clinton for president in 2016, and 74.6 percent of the district voted for Newsom for governor in 2018.

    About the Race

    In the primary, Democrat incumbent Representative Anthony Rendón led another Democratic challenger Maria Estrada by a margin of 16 percent. Rendón’s campaign has raised $1,343,191.78. His campaign has not committed to refusing corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, and is funded by all three groups. Estrada’s campaign has raised $27,581.76, the bulk of which comes from individual donors. While her campaign has not taken corporate PAC, fossil fuel, or police money, Estrada has yet to pledge to refuse such funds.

    About the Candidate

    Rep. Anthony Rendón, assemblymember since 2012 and speaker of the California State Assembly since 2016, is the son of working-class parents and grandson of Mexican immigrants.

    He currently sits on the Arts Committee and the Rules Committee. As assemblymember, Rendón has passed key progressive legislation, including on environmental protections, gun violence prevention, affordable housing, and minimum wage.

    He scores a lifetime score of 97 out of 100 on Courage Score, our annual analysis of legislators’ progressive voting records. Based on our Courage Score analysis, Rep. Anthony Rendón has supported the most progressive bills that made it to a vote. That said, in 2017 Rep. Rendón used his power as speaker to sideline legislation that would have established single-payer health care in California after receiving $100,000 from pharmaceutical groups and $50,000 from medical insurance groups, so his Courage Score is misleading.

    Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Rep. Rendón served as executive director of Plaza de la Raza Child Development Services, which provides child development, social, and medical services to families in Los Angeles County. He is a longtime supporter of child education.

    Anthony Rendón is endorsed by many progressive groups in the district. He is also endorsed by several police organizations. Although we disagree with Rendón’s ties to corporate, fossil fuel, and police interests, and know that a stronger progressive candidate would more accurately represent SD-15, Rendón is the strongest choice for equitable and representative leadership in office. That said, we encourage more progressive candidates that will better reflect this community’s needs to run formidable campaigns in future cycles.